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In the flaming sphere spell description it is said that "the surface of the sphere has a spongy, yielding consistency".

So the sphere has some "consistency" and acts like a physical object, rolling over obstacles and bumping up against people and walls. Can it thus possibly be moved/kicked away by another?

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I would say "yes," as it's generally good practice to say yes to clever PC ideas. The spell description does make it sound like the spell effect is effectively a big world-ball coated in napalm.

Now, it is big (5 foot diameter!), so I would count it as a Medium creature and simply make it subject to the various relevant Combat Maneuvers - Bull Rush and Reposition being the two most probable candidates (though I could see someone who is fire immune trying to Grapple it to keep it in place). I'd count its CMD as either the caster's CMD using Int instead of Str (remember it's being controlled telekinetically) or maybe their Spellcraft, I'd have to run some numbers. I would rule that anyone doing this would take full damage from the sphere, no save - the Reflex save is you trying to get out of the way, this action would be deliberately forgoing that to make contact with it!

The ball moves with the caster's will and can go up to 30' through the air, so it's unlikely that this will prove much of an impediment (only a giant would be able to bull rush it that far, that it won't just come back on its turn) but it seems like a fun dynamic addition to the battlefield.

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+1 good answer. However, the question is tagged pathfinder & 3.5 and this seems to only address pathfinder..any ideas how you would adjudicate for 3.5? –  Ben-Jamin Jan 20 '13 at 20:05
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The spell's description (in dnd3.5) begins with "A burning globe of fire" - so, the sphere is made of fire, hence I'd say no, you can't kick/move it, unless you, by some weird power/ability, can kick/move flames. (Lacking that yet trying to kick it I'd say your leg passes through it as if through water... and you get burnt for 2d6 points of fire damage, with no Reflex save (since you've just done your best not to avoid the sphere.))

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In Pathfinder it is stated that the sphere has "a spongy, yielding consistency" and that "It cannot push aside unwilling creatures or batter down large obstacles". This seems to imply that it can bate down small obstacles. Of course this does not automatically mean that is movable ... –  Matteo Oct 19 '11 at 11:43
    
The spell's Description is the same for both DnD3.5 and Pathfinder. I wrote my answer knowing about the spongy, yielding consistency (which, in my reading, is water-like, only even less dense, as can be expected of fire.) So still, no, you can't kick it or move it (you can do the latter if you're the one who evoked it, of course... But it is a magical effect, and its desc. says that if its evoker does not move it, "it merely stays at rest and burns.") –  OpaCitiZen Oct 19 '11 at 18:27
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I also so say that the sphere can not be kicked away, but not because it lacks a physical body to move it. Rather, the spell description says that it keeps moving as the caster directs it, however if not being directed it stays still.

One could easily argue that since it requires a move action of the wizard to move, then it is subject to the whim of the environment if it is not being directed. However it also says specifically that it does not move and just sits in one place if not directed. To me, this statement is only needed if it doesn't move no matter what. So unless you have some magic spell to overpower the flaming sphere magic spell, I think it can not be easily moved.

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+1, but question, if the caster makes it 10' off the ground, does it fall to the ground after his turn or when he quits concentrating on it? If it does then it sends a solid reinforcement of the idea the caster controls exactly where it goes at all times but if it falls to the ground does not necessarily mean otherwise..) –  Ben-Jamin Jan 20 '13 at 20:09
    
"As part of this movement, it can ascend or jump up to 30 feet to strike a target." 10' it should stay there. 40' I think it should descend to 30' –  GMNoob Jan 21 '13 at 8:07
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I would say you CANNOT kick it. It is a 5 foot diameter. If you are an adult dragon, you could use it as a kickball, but then again, if you are an adult dragon, you would be too busy laughing at the guy for casting it at you to remember to kick the ball.

Otherwise, if you are large enough to kick a 5 foot diameter (1.5meter) ball, then go for it. You would take the same damage as it hitting you, and maybe a fortitude save to resist damage.

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I think this is very much the DM's call. The Pathfinder spell description does specifically read "the surface of the sphere has a spongy, yielding consistency..." so I could see the straight up 'no' answer being valid. If I were to allow it, however, this is how I would do it (assuming Pathfinder rules):

  1. The attacker would execute either a Reposition or Bull Rush combat maneuver, against a CMD of 9 (10 + -1 for sphere's small size) + Caster's Spellcasting Ability Modifier (Wis for Druid, Int for Wizard, etc).
  2. The sphere cannot take an attack of opportunity, but anyone else adjacent and willing could take one (if the attacker doesn't have the appropriate Improved- maneuver feat).
  3. The one executing the combat maneuver would take the 3d6 of damage without reflex save (as stated in an earlier post). Unless they are executing the maneuver with a shield or a reach weapon, either of which would take the damage in the character's stead.

But then on the caster's turn, he could just move the sphere again anyway.

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