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Does casting Pyrotechnics for fireworks break Invisibility?

For example, a caster turns invisible, then casts Pyrotechnics on a burning tree, which forces several creature to roll a saving throw or being blinded. Does the caster become visible?


This is a question in my mind because the target is one object (not a creature or area). However the text of the spell says that the creatures are effected.

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7  
Food for thought: what about casting Daylight in a Drow-filled room? Does this differ from casting Daylight in a room not containing light-sensitive creatures? –  dlras2 Mar 13 '12 at 21:56
    
@DanRasmussen I would say no, but I expect at least one of my players would disagree. :-) –  C. Ross Mar 14 '12 at 12:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It depends on how you define "area of effect," but probably not.

Invisibility states:

The spell ends if the subject attacks any creature. For purposes of this spell, an attack includes any spell targeting a foe or whose area or effect includes a foe.

[...] Actions directed at unattended objects do not break the spell.

[...] Causing harm indirectly is not an attack.

[...] Thus, an invisible being can open doors, talk, eat, climb stairs, summon monsters and have them attack, cut the ropes holding a rope bridge while enemies are on the bridge, remotely trigger traps, open a portcullis to release attack dogs, and so forth.

Pyrotechnics states:

Target one fire source, up to a 20-ft. cube

Saving Throw Will negates or Fortitude negates; see text;

Pyrotechnics turns a fire into a burst of blinding fireworks or a thick cloud of choking smoke, depending on your choice.

Fireworks: This effect causes creatures within 120 feet of the fire source to become blinded for 1d4+1 rounds (Will negates). [...] Spell resistance can prevent blindness.

So there are two interpretations:

  • Pyrotechnics is cast on the fire, which then has a harmful side effect (creating fireworks). This would not break invisibility.

  • Pyrotechnics is an area of effect spell, but simply doesn't note it in the summary due to the modality of the spell. This would break invisibility.

The key here is how you interpret this line:

Fireworks: This effect causes creatures within 120 feet of the fire source to become blinded for 1d4+1 rounds (Will negates). [...] Spell resistance can prevent blindness.

Does the effect of "Fireworks" count as an effect of Pyrotechnics? Or is the effect of Pyrotechnics to generate a "fireworks" object that then generates this effect? The former will break invisibility, the latter will not.

As Pyrotechnics does not specify an area in its summary, I would lean towards Fireworks being created by Pyrotechnics, and invisibility not breaking.

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@Dan I actually need to rework this after reading YOUR post :) I misread "area or effect" and the correct wording makes things much murkier. –  AceCalhoon Mar 13 '12 at 21:47
    
I'm not entirely sure either.. I reworded my answer to clarify "area" vs "effect." –  dlras2 Mar 13 '12 at 21:53

Yes, I think. To quote from Invisibility:

The spell ends if the subject attacks any creature. For purposes of this spell, an attack includes any spell targeting a foe or whose area or effect includes a foe.

To quote from Pyrotechnics, when used for this purpose:

This effect causes creatures within 120 feet of the fire source to become blinded.

I would argue that, rules-as-written, this constitutes an attack on those creatures.

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