Take the 2-minute tour ×
Role-playing Games Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for gamemasters and players of tabletop, paper-and-pencil role-playing games. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question is essentially as the title is stated. I was wondering whether in Pathfinder one can place multiple traps on an object. For instance, can you place a Glyph of Warding, which is a spell, and then also place a Magical Trap on the same object?

EDIT:

I am new to Role-Playing Games and so I am new to Pathfinder as well.

I was looking to try and protect my wizards spellbooks and I wanted to lay series of wards and traps, but I was wondering can you place multiple wards, spells, and traps on the same object? Can you place a magical trap and a mechanical trap on the same object?

Any enlightenment on this subject would be most appreciated.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is nothing to stop you placing multiple traps on an object, so long as you remain within the bounds of what your GM allows and what you can reasonably achieve.

On that note, there's no limit to the numeber of spells that can be active on an object.

There's no actual rule that limits the number of craft wonderous item-type magic traps that can be placed on an object, but I've known GMs who liked to increase the gp cost of each enhancement after the first, so do ask.

Mundane traps tend to take up physical space, what with needing moving parts, so they to suffer from the harshest limits on available space. I doubt you'll use many of these to protect a spellbook, though.

Note that magic traps and spell traps tend to have fairly specific trigger conditions, so be aware that you may have to be creative if you want all your protective traps to go off at once.

By the way, when protecting a spellbook, make sure you select spells that don't damage the spellbook when triggered. Stay away from Explosive Runes, but Fire Trap is a good bet. Also, I reccomend using non-damaging spells like Sepia Snake Sigil, because catching the thief is often a lot more interesting than killing them.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.