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Can a player doing a Charge action, continue the movement after the target uses an Immediate Interrupt to do something, e.g. Shift or Teleport, to move away ?

And what direction do they have to go? ... *I'm thinking here of the target moving back along the line of the charge, and the player having to reverse the direction of the Charge ... but what about the pseudo "momentum" effect*

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It depends on what triggered the shift.

As @ioanwigmore pointed out, PHB1 p.287 describes a Charge as (emphasis mine):

Move and Attack: Move your speed as part of a charge and make a melee basic attack or a bull rush at the end of your move.

As @Ravn pointed out, PHB1 pg 268 describes an Immediate Interrupt as (emphasis mine):

An immediate interrupt lets you jump in when a certain trigger condition arises, acting before the trigger resolves. If an interrupt invalidates a triggering action, that action is lost. For example, an enemy makes a melee attack against you, but you use a power that lets you shift away as an immediate interrupt. If your enemy can no longer reach you, the enemy’s attack action is lost.

Case 1: If the attack was the trigger (for example, Trigger: You are the target of a melee attack.), then movement is already done. The charger has already transitioned from the "movement" phase of the charge to the "attack" phase, and can't move any more.

Case 2: If the movement was the trigger (for example, Trigger: A foe enters a square adjacent to you.) then the shift happens before the "movement" phase of the charge resolves (i.e. finishes). In that case the charger can continue as long as they have movement left and each square of movement brings them closer to the target's new location.

The pseudo-momentum doesn't say you can't change directions, only that you must always be getting closer to your target. For example, because of how 4e counts diagonals, the following 90 degree turn in mid-charge is perfectly valid:

oTooooo
ooFoooo
oooPooo
ooooPoo
XXXooPo
ooooPoo
oooPooo
ooSoooo

o = empty space, X = obstacles, T = target, S = charger's starting position, F = charger's final position, P = charger's path

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No.

As the rules in PH1 (page 287) for charge read

Move and Attack: Move your speed as part of a charge and make a melee basic attack or a bull rush at the end of your move.

I'd argue that if the interrupt occurs during the melee basic attack (or bull rush or substituted power), and not during the move, then by RAW "end of your move" means no you cannot keep on charging, as it is the attack roll that has been interrupted, not the movement.

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This is true. I guess it depends on what the interrupt is in response to. If it's the MBA, then ioanwigmore's answer seems right. If it's the charger moving adjacent to the interrupter, see my reply below. –  Ravn Jun 3 '12 at 17:03
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Assuming the interrupt trigger was the charger moving adjacent to the interrupter:

In Player's Handbook 1, page 268, it says about immediate interrupts;

lets you jump in when a certain trigger condition arises, acting before the trigger resolves. If an interrupt invalidates a triggering action, that action is lost. For example, an enemy makes a melee attack against you, but you use a power that lets you shift away as an immediate interrupt. If your enemy can no longer reach you, the enemy’s attack action is lost.

Since the interrupt acts before the trigger (the charge) is fully resolved, I'd say the charging player could finish his move, provided he still has squares of movement left for it.

If the interrupter moves out of range of the charge, it's invalidated and lost (the charge stops).

If the interrupt trigger is the MBA, the charger cannot again. As ioanwigmore noted in his answer, the MBA part of a charge comes after the movement is resolved.

As for direction, I'm not completely sure. As far as I can tell from the RAW on charging (PH1, page 287 and errata), there's no reason why a player couldn't continue charging and just change direction, as long as the movement gets him closer to the target.

To preserve momentum, one could argue that the charging player picks a specific square as his charge target. This way, if the interrupter simply shifts, the charger should still be able to hit him with a MBA, but if the interrupter teleports behind the charger, he's potentially out of reach.

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