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In 'In A Wicked Age', a person who rolls lower dice against higher dice, and survives the first round, is supposed to go on the owe list. How do you handle a first-round purchased advantage die into this? For a few questioned examples:

1) If my character has a d12 and a d8, and an advantage die, and your character has a d12 and a d10, which of us goes on the owe list?

2) If my character has a d10 and a d6, and has an additional d6 particular strength, and your character has a d10 and a d6, and a purchased advantage die (d6), do either of us go on the owe list?

3) If my character has a d10, a d4, and an advantage die, and your character has a d10 and a d6, which of us goes on the owe list?

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2 Answers

I'd be interested to hear what Vincent says on the matter. And no other answer will be authoritative. But, the idea in the rules is that you go on the owe list when you roll against a stronger opponent; at a disadvantage. So:

1) No. 2) I think the character with the particular strength has the lower ability. 3) I do.

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Thanks for the suggestion to contact Vincent--I ended up getting in contact with him, and it helped lead to the answer I put below. –  Brisbe42 Sep 1 '10 at 4:56
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I got this ruling from Vincent Baker, the system's creator (original reference: http://www.lumpley.com/comment.php?entry=342#34):

On 2010-09-01, Vincent wrote:
Ah! Since advantage dice ADD to the high die, they don't count as just a d6. Effectively, it's...

1) d18 d8 vs d12 d10, so the person with d12 d10 goes on the owe list.

2) oops! I see I made a mistake. Case 2 is d10 d6 d6 vs d16 d6, so the person with the d6 particular strength goes on the owe list.

3) d16 d4 vs d10 d6, so the person with d10 d6 goes on the owe list.

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I guess that's a quickish way to figure it. I'm not sure I buy that e.g. 1D8/1D8/1D8 should be considered lower than 1D4/1D4+1D6 but figuring out the actual odds for every permutation is silly and his ruling, as a rule of thumb seems just fine. –  clweeks Sep 1 '10 at 13:10
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