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Additional attacks are a good thing to have and some feats give you those - like, Tentacles with a slam stack from Aberrant bloodline, or Bite attack from Vile. The question is - do those recieve Monk's bonuses to unarmed damage, like damage progression and ki strikes? Also, do those count against Monk's BAB so he has to choose, to slam with a tentacle or to kick in the head? Oh, and just to be save - can a character have more than one bloodline feat (Vile, Aberrant etc) or has he to choose just one of those?

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I'm not entirely certain what you're asking in the second part of the question: are you trying to find out if the Monk can make a full attack with weapons/unarmed strikes and his natural attacks? –  Lord_Gareth Feb 25 '13 at 15:08
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Unarmed Strikes are a type of natural weapon (and, for the Monk, also a type of manufactured weapon; they’re weird). Tentacles, claws, and so on are other types of natural weapons, not Unarmed Strikes, and they neither benefit from the Monk’s Unarmed Strike class feature, nor are they Monk weapons that can be used for, e.g., Flurry of Blows.

That said, there are feats to allow you to treat things as Monk weapons that usually aren’t; there may be one for the natural weapons you’re interested in. There is also the Beast Strike feat (Dragon vol. 355), which allows your Unarmed Strikes to add your Claw or Slam attack damage on top of the normal (Monk-improved) Unarmed Strike damage. Since these are still Unarmed Strikes (just with extra damage), they count as Monk weapons.

Finally, you can mix natural weapons into a full-attack with Unarmed Strikes (or any other manufactured weapon), and Flurry of Blows is explicitly a type of full-attack. This means you make your Flurry of Blows attacks (presumably with Unarmed Strikes), and then you also make your other natural weapon attacks (but always as secondaries). Normally, a creature that mixes manufactured and natural weapons in a full-attack routine is limited by his or her limbs: you cannot Claw with the same hand that’s holding a sword, for example. But in the case of the Monk, who can make Unarmed Strikes with any part of the body, you are safe to simply always make Unarmed Strikes with parts of the body that aren’t needed for your natural weapons (e.g. if you want to use your Claws, simply kick instead of punch).

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+1 for providing resources to treat the Nat Attacks as Unarmed Strikes, I never knew about that before. –  Lord_Gareth Feb 25 '13 at 15:30
    
It was hard to decide whose answer was better, both of you did well, thanks 8) –  Baka-Mastermind Feb 25 '13 at 16:16
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They Do Not Receive Monk's Bonus Unarmed Damage

Those additional attacks are not Unarmed Strikes, but rather their own kinds of Natural Attacks, and as a result don't benefit from Monk's Unarmed Strike damage bonus, nor are they treated as both natural and manufactured weapons the way the Monk's Unarmed Strike is.

You Can Use Them In a Full Attack

Natural Weapons can be combined with Unarmed Strikes/Manufactured Weapons in a full attack. You make your attacks with the Unarmed Strikes/Manufactured Weapons as normal for your BAB, and then make one attack with each of your Natural Attacks at your full BAB minus five (so if your BAB was +10, those additional attacks would be at +5). If you have multiple natural attacks, consider the Multiattack feat to solve this to some extent. This is true for all characters, not just Monks; however, since Monks can make Unarmed Strikes with non-hand parts of their body, they can combine Unarmed Strikes with Claw attacks, the only class capable of doing so.

Vile Feats are Not Bloodline Feats

Vile feats are expressions of a character's ineffable evil and are not, generally, exclusive with other Vile feats (specific exceptions may exist) and do not generally conflict with Aberrant feats. Some Aberrant feats may be "bloodline" feats - see Lords of Madness - and as a result conflict with each other and/or with feats like Draconic Bloodline. However, if the rules don't say they conflict there's no reason they have to (and with the way things breed in D&D I'd believe an incredibly mixed bloodline).

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A great answer, thanks 8) –  Baka-Mastermind Feb 25 '13 at 16:17
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