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If I charge an enemy, when I move adjacent to it do I provoke an OA from him? (the target himself that is)

In my first game in a new group my friends an me are making, we thought that it does not.

I have been thinking about it however, and as it is not a shift, shouldn't it?

If it does, does that mean that a fighter who was a victim of a charge can OA his assailant, stopping his movement, preventing the attack?

As a quick supplement question, It is allowed to make a move then a charge attack. This move would consist of a move action, then a standard action, which is legal correct?

NOTE: this question was answered in the comments below, I have misinterprited the nature of OAs

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marked as duplicate by Jonathan Hobbs, BESW, wax eagle, Tynam, yhw42 Mar 3 '13 at 14:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
It sounds like you're confused about the nature of opportunity attacks. I think this answer may clear that up. –  BESW Mar 3 '13 at 7:09
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up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you charge an enemy you will not provoke an OA attack from him unless he has threatening reach of at least 2 squares where you are moving from one of those squares. The fact that you're approaching him in and of itself doesn't provoke an attack. It goes off when you are leaving a threatened square.

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