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For some spells, like Darkvision, no one else can cast permanency on you to make the effect last until dispelled*. So for non-caster's there's no way to permanently get that... unless you can find a way to use someone else's caster level while casting a spell, such as when reading a scroll.

*Permanency makes the duration of certain other spells permanent. You first cast the desired spell and then follow it with the permanency spell.

Depending on the spell, you must be of a minimum caster level and must expend a specific gp value of diamond dust as a material component.

You can make the following spells permanent in regard to yourself. You cannot cast these spells on other creatures. This application of permanency can be dispelled only by a caster of higher level than you were when you cast the spell.

Can there be a scroll of permanency? - Yes, according to Ernir, but the cost (both for CL and diamond dust) would depend on what you intend to make permanent with it, thus it would be a very specific item.

However, once you get it: When using UMD to successfully cast it, while under the influence of a spell that's to be made permanent, will that work?

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I assume the RAI of splitting the spells into some that others can make permanent on you and some that only you can was to limit those permanency spells to certain classes, but RAW I can't find anything that suggests you couldn't use a wand of permanency. –  Julix Jun 2 '13 at 9:16
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RAW there is every reason you can't have a wand of permanency: wands can only hold spells of 4th level and lower. Scrolls should be the focus of this question. –  BESW Jun 2 '13 at 9:22
    
Thanks for catching and fixing that, BESW! :-) –  Julix Jun 2 '13 at 10:31

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Yes, such a scroll can exist, but it's a rather specific item.

When a spell refers to "your caster level", it is the caster level at which the spell is cast, rather than the caster level as it would be generally calculated from the caster's classes. The "you must be of a minimum caster level" clause is not a problem for scroll-casters, its meaning then just translates to "the scroll must be of a minimum caster level" (read: you would need a CL 10 scroll of Permanency to apply it to Darkvision).

Likewise, the "in regard to yourself" clause refers to the caster, which would be the user of the scroll rather than its creator.

However, it is not sufficient for the scroll's user to be in possession of the diamond dust, as material components of scroll spells must be supplied at the time of crafting. So to make a scroll of Permanency that can make a Darkvision spell permanent, you would need a CL 10 scroll that has the 5000gp material component built in as part of its creation process.

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I'm still thrown off by the "in regard to yourself" phrase. Does a successful UMD check allow me to basically pretend my CL is that of the maker? So if I give an 11th lvl wizard that's helpful towards me enough diamond dust, and pay him to make a scroll for me, then it has a CL of 11. If I trigger that spell with UMD I'm basically just finishing the spell off, but effectively am casting it with a CL of 11, correct? Is it not the rule to use the scroll's CL in place of your own when casting? Thus a powerful mage with a weak weak weak scroll would have to cast the spell with that low CL, right? –  Julix Jun 2 '13 at 10:41
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The 11th level Wizard can create the scroll at any CL he likes, within parameters (no higher than his own CL, no lower than what the Permanency spell requires). Were he to create a CL 11 scroll, you would be using that caster level for all of the spell's purposes when using the scroll. And yes, a high level caster with a low level scroll would use the scroll's CL when casting a spell stored in that scroll. –  Ernir Jun 2 '13 at 10:47

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