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What content can I reproduce from the pathfinder gaming system. Is it anything from the Core rulebook that isn't a specific name?

For example, I like the D20PFSRD but the layout and ads annoy me.

I want on my own website to create my own public reference for the Pathfinder classes, feats, prestige classes, all of that jazz. No I'm not naive and am aware of the abundance of content, I won't be doing all of it but a lot of the Core rulebook in a cleaner way.

What can I "not" copy from the core rulebook onto the site.

What can I "not" copy from other books listed in the Pathfinder OGL.

I understand of course I'll have to copy and link the OGL from Pathfinders website in a easily viewable location.

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You definitely cannot copy d20PFSRD itself, you have to start your work with Paizo's content. No taking advantage of the considerable work that the owner of d20PFSRD has put into organizing and hyperlinking all of that information. –  KRyan Jul 2 '13 at 19:41
    
Technically I think what's on there "can" be reproduced as they're reproducing it in the first place. But that is not my goal. –  Moylin Jul 2 '13 at 19:48
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@KRyan While I understand the sentiment, d20PFSRD is bound by the OGL. It is completely within the spirit of the OGL to copy and improve previous works, as long as your sources are cited and you don't reproduce any designated Product Identity. –  Steve G Jul 2 '13 at 20:21
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Not an answer but... maybe the Pathfinder Reference Document would suit you better than d20PFSRD. –  leokhorn Jul 2 '13 at 20:31
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@Moylin You had better ask a lawyer about that, because I think you are most likely wrong and using any code, styles, and so on would be copyright infringement. The content (with specific exceptions) is Open Game Content under the OGL, but that doesn't discuss (and therefore does not allow you to use) things like layout and organization. It certainly doesn't address the owner's HTML mark-up and stylesheets. –  KRyan Jul 2 '13 at 21:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Technically, what you are able to reproduce from any OGL work is everything that the OGL statement in that work says you can.

Now, it's very likely that the PRD has most of that from most of the Pathfinder books, and that it's a pretty good arbiter of how to interpret the OGL statement when it's not clear. However, that's not guaranteed, and if you're getting set to do hundreds of man-hours of work yourself, you should first read and understand that statement because that's the real "letter of the law." The PRD may not have everything you're entitled to reproduce, for example.

Copying from the d20PFSRD is similarly not guaranteed. If Paizo makes a mistake on their PRD - well, they're certainly not going to sue themselves... d20PFSRD pulls from many locations and makes improvements/alterations. It's "probably safe" but again, the real guideline isn't what someone else has decided is open content, it's what the OGL states is open content.

You are looking for statement of Product Identity (can not copy) and Open Content (can copy). It will read like this (this one cut and pasted from the Carrion Crown AP):

Product Identity: The following items are hereby identified as Product Identity, as defined in the Open Game License version 1.0a, Section 1(e), and are not Open Content: All trademarks, registered trademarks, proper names (characters, deities, etc.), dialogue, plots, storylines, locations, characters, artwork, and trade dress. (Elements that have previously been designated as Open Game Content or are in the public domain are not included in this declaration.)

Open Content: Except for material designated as Product Identity (see above), the game mechanics of this Paizo Publishing game product are Open Game Content, as defined in the Open Game License version 1.0a Section 1(d). No portion of this work other than the material designated as Open Game Content may be reproduced in any form without written permission.

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Unnecessary Adblock comments aside and ignored. This seemed to be the most accurate answer. The confusion that occurred for me was that they listed spells as PI but then provided spells in the PRD. Looking back I assume this was for customized spells perhaps local to their environment the way 3.0 had Mordenkainen's what not. This lead me to doubt my understanding of what they considered PI. –  Moylin Jul 3 '13 at 1:06

The differences you have noticed between the core rulebook and the Pathfinder Reference Document are exactly everything that you may not reproduce. Put another way, the PRD exists to be exactly everything that is covered by the OGL.

If it's not in the PRD, you may not reproduce it. That's what the name "Pathfinder Reference Document" means: it documents the OGLed parts of Pathfinder for your reference.

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This, exactly, was what I was getting at with my comments. –  KRyan Jul 2 '13 at 21:52
    
I appreciate the response. The issues I think that confused me regarding this was that PI included spells and other content that they then provided that are PI but yet they listed them in the PRD. Basically their PRD is what i can reproduce on my own, perhaps applying fixes from errata and the rulebooks they reference. –  Moylin Jul 3 '13 at 0:52
    
@Moylin Where did you read that spells are PI? Spells aren't mentioned in the PI section of the PRD license I'm looking at. –  SevenSidedDie Jul 3 '13 at 3:58
    
(e) "Product Identity" names and descriptions of characters, spells, enchantments, personalities, teams, personas, likenesses and special abilities; places, locations, environments, creatures, equipment, magical or supernatural abilities or effects, logos, symbols, or graphic designs –  Moylin Jul 3 '13 at 9:18
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@Moylin - That's the default, but you need to look at what Paizo designates OC vs PI as well: Product Identity: The following items are hereby identified as Product Identity, ... and are not Open Content: All trademarks, registered trademarks, proper names (characters, deities, etc.), dialogue, plots, storylines, locations, characters, artworks, and trade dress. | Open Content: Except for material designated as Product Identity (see above), the game mechanics of this Paizo Publishing game product are Open Game Content. –  Bobson Jul 3 '13 at 17:01

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