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If a fighter has two weapons, can he use one to attack and the other for defense with a Full-Defense maneuver?

I know that Defense does not apply in this case because it requires that the "character’s only regular action is to defend".

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Yes, this is entirely possible. Maneuvers like Full-Defense are equivalent to an attack.

Full Defense does require a hand to use; after all, it's still a Fighting attack.

Bonuses and penalties apply in the same way to both the attack and the full-defense, but it is important to note that the full-defense is equivalent to an attack (so it is affected by Two-Fisted, even if the description of the edge says "When attacking with a weapon in each hand..." and the character is not attacking but defending with that weapon).

Some examples (based on these examples from the official forum):

  • A character with no edges attacks with the good hand and does full-defense with the off-hand. The attack is at -2 (multi-action penalty, MAP); the full-defense Fighting roll is at -2 (+2 full-defense, -2 MAP, -2 off-hand), and the result substitutes Parry if it is higher.
  • A character with Two-Fisted attacks with the off-hand and does full-defense with the good hand. The attack is at -2 (off-hand); the full-defense Fighting roll is at +2 (standard full-defense) and the result substitutes Parry if it is higher.
  • A character with Two-Fisted and Ambidextrous attacks and does full-defense. The attack is at +0; the full-defense Fighting roll is at +2 (standard full-defense) and the result substitutes Parry if it is higher.
  • A character with Two-Fisted and Ambidextrous does a wild attack with one hand and full-defense with the other. The attack is at +2 (wild attack); the full-defense Fighting roll is at +4 (+2 full-defense, +2 wild attack) and the result substitutes Parry if it is higher. The resulting Parry is then subtracted -2 (wild attack).
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