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Ok, the Held actions have been giving us a lot of trouble recently. I'm gonna illustrate a situation: Let's say a vampire gets a King of Spades, a zombie gets a 3 of hearts, a ranger gets a Queen of Diamonds and a knight gets a 2 of clubs.

The knight, who goest last, decides to put his action on hold to interrupt the vampire next round. The knight is not dealt in, he's still a 2 of clubs, but the vampire gets lucky and gets an Ace of Spades... does the knight get unlucky and can't interrupt until it's his turn? Or can he interrupt right away?

And now, let's say the knight decides to act on his action, like, walking, then swinging his blade, and he decides to be put on hold after that to shoot an arrow to the vampire, can he do that, or does he hold the entire turn when he takes a hold action? Either strategies seem quite broken if you ask me.

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I've answered the two parts of your question below, but was unsure what you meant when you say the strategy seems broken. Can you provide more detail as to exactly what you mean by that? –  Phil Jul 28 '13 at 20:22

2 Answers 2

Going on Hold across multiple rounds

When you go on Hold, you are not dealt in for following rounds, and you can take your turn at any point - the value of the card no longer has any meaning. So, in your example, the knight could still attempt to interrupt the vampire even if the vampire was dealt an ace of spades for their initiative. Remember though that interrupting successfully requires an opposed Agility roll.

See this post on the official forum for confirmation of this.

Can you take free actions and still go on Hold?

You have to hold your entire turn and cannot take any actions, including free ones such as walking or talking.

See this post on the official forum for confirmation of this.

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We indicate held actions by turning over the card. It emphasises that the value no longer matters, and it can't be mistaken for a just-dealt card. –  SevenSidedDie Jul 29 '13 at 3:50
    
It also prevents your card from being shuffled back in, preventing the possibility of more than 2 jokers in a round. –  Toast Jul 30 '13 at 15:00

The knight, who goest last, decides to put his action on hold to interrupt the vampire next round. The knight is not dealt in, he's still a 2 of clubs, but the vampire gets lucky and gets an Ace of Spades... does the knight get unlucky and can't interrupt until it's his turn? Or can he interrupt right away?

On the knight's initiative in round 1, he opts to go on hold. Because his action is last, round 2 will start with him on hold. He can attempt to interrupt anyone during this round regardless of the initiative they received.

And now, let's say the knight decides to act on his action, like, walking, then swinging his blade, and he decides to be put on hold after that to shoot an arrow to the vampire, can he do that, or does he hold the entire turn when he takes a hold action?

You can't go on hold if you've taken any action, even movement. If the knight chooses to act on his 2 of clubs, he'll be dealt an initiative card in round 2 like everyone else.

Either strategies seem quite broken if you ask me.

Remember that when interrupting actions, there's still a roll to see who goes first. The knight isn't guaranteed to interrupt the vampire, and may find that he wasted an entire round in an attempt to do so.

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