Take the 2-minute tour ×
Role-playing Games Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for gamemasters and players of tabletop, paper-and-pencil role-playing games. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say you're at 23 HP and your CON score is 15. You're hit by Finger of Death cast by a 13th level Wizard, and as a result suffer 130 damage. Are you left at -107 HP, or does it simply drop you to -15 HP?

In 3.5e, I think it would have left you at -10 HP. However, I cannot for the life of me find anything in Pathfinder that says it wouldn't just leave you at -107 HP.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I can't find an explicit ruling on this, but In the Pathfinder Core Rulebook, page 562, under Death Attacks it states:

"In case it matters, a dead character, no matter how he died, has hit points equal to or less than his negative constitution score."

This implies that it's possible for damage to reduce health lower than negative con.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree. Once you have a lower HP score than your negative con, you're dead. If you went 1 below or 100 below this limit does not make any difference in a technical sense. In a cinematic sense, it still might :-) –  thomax Aug 15 '13 at 12:14

You can go below -CON. The character would be at -107 hit points.

The spell Breath of Life relies on characters being able to have less than -CON hp in order function as written. (You could not use the spell in this specific scenario, as finger of death is a death affect)

share|improve this answer
4  
@Kethryweryn I feel your edit was to dramatic and have I reverted it. I added the information you provided to my answer to hopefully clarify the situation. Please consider posting that information as a comment in the future. –  Colin D Aug 16 '13 at 12:20

It would leave you at -107 HP. Nowhere in the rules does it say there is a minimum your health can reach. Besides, specific rules (like powers) always beat the broad rules. Going past your negative CON makes it much harder to revive, as the fatal wound is clearly much worse than most.

The best way to picture it is to compare your heart stopping (any easy fix, just shock it untill it pumps again) and your heart being torn out.

share|improve this answer
11  
Do you think you could explain why you feel your answer is justified? –  LitheOhm Aug 15 '13 at 20:19
1  
While I'm not won by the analogy, +1 for bettering this through editing. –  leokhorn Aug 20 '13 at 12:51
    
The analogy is weird, yeah. :P +1 for the rest of it though! –  doppelgreener Aug 20 '13 at 13:18
    
I'm sorry for the weird analogy, but it was the first one I could come up with –  Flotolk Aug 20 '13 at 16:05
    
It is kinda tough to make a good analogy when taking about death in any case. If anyone can find one that's more appropriate, please replace it. –  Flotolk Aug 20 '13 at 17:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.