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Blade of the Eldritch Knight

When you use a standard action to make a melee attack with this blade, your melee reach increases to 5 for that attack.

Charge Movement Requirements

You must move at least 2 squares from your starting position, and you must move directly to the nearest square from which you can attack the enemy. You can’t charge if the nearest square is occupied. Moving over difficult terrain costs extra squares of movement as normal.

If I'm standing 5 squares away from an enemy, does the text in the movement requirements for charge require me to attack from 5 squares away because that is "The nearest square from which I can attack" or does this mean that I can charge 2 squares and make the attack from 3 squares away because that is the closest square I can legally attack from (after moving the required 2 squares).

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can charge from within 5 squares.

Wizards has updated the rules from the Player's Handbook. You can find all rules changes on their 4e errata page.

In this case, the line which says "you must move directly to the nearest square from which you can attack the enemy" has been struck from the books. Quoting from the Rules Compendium (p240), which is the most up-to-date dead-tree version of the rules:

Move: The creature moves up to its speed toward the target. Each square of movement must bring the creature closer to the target, and the creature must end the move at least 2 squares away from its starting position.

This means your second scenario ("charge 2 squares and make the attack from 3 squares away") is legal.

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