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I want to do a build that is Paladin and Oracle, but I can't seem to find any concrete information on going about this. If I start at Paladin, get to level 2, then level Oracle to 4, can I then continue getting levels in Paladin at total level 7, or can I not go back to previous classes?

One friend has told me you cannot do that, but I can't find anything online about it. We are playing Pathfinder and this is a new half-elf character starting at level 4, so I'm not invested in it yet.

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2 Answers 2

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Yes, you can level a multiclass Paladin further in Pathfinder. Your friend may be thinking of a restriction from the 3.5 edition of Dungeons & Dragons:

Like a member of any other class, a paladin may be a multiclass character, but multiclass paladins face a special restriction. A paladin who gains a level in any class other than paladin may never again raise her paladin level, though she retains all her paladin abilities.

This clause, found in the Ex-Paladins section, is not present in Pathfinder, and there is no general rule that prevents you from going back to any previously levelled class in either game. Alignment restrictions on advancement still apply, though, in the case of paladins, monks and select other classes.

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Your friend would be correct if you were playing 3.5e, but Pathfinder got rid of this rule. You can go back to Paladin.

The last edition where you couldn't go back to Paladin was 3.5e, and even in that edition, it only applied to paladins and monks: everyone else could multiclass freely. Pathfinder dispensed with this entirely, among others: also notable is that characters don't take penalties if their classes are too far apart in level.

It is also possible that your friend might have been thinking of 2e dual-classing, where no one who took a second class could go back to the first. They even took penalties for using abilities from the old class until they were "caught up" level-wise in the new class. This stuff only applied to humans anyway; other races had their own multiclassing rules, but they worked completely differently, and 3e got rid of that.

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