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I'm currently in the process on finishing up my Pixie Sorcerer Character and I wanted to theme him around the idea that he's actually too lazy to fly himself, so instead he rides his Storm Talon familiar wherever he goes. I'm not sure on the rules though, so I checked out this thread, where it states the following:

Arcane Casters: How to ride your Familiar:

All this requires is the Familiar Mount ritual (Which you must cast yourself), and a little imagination as to how it works for some familiars. How exactly DO you get a saddle on a Tiny Gelatinous Cube? Note that this ritual does not actually turn your familiar into a mount, and thusly does not allow your familiar to use mount slot items

The Familiar Mount Ritual states:

Your familiar grows to Large size and can accommodate you as a rider, and it is in active mode for the duration. You can end the ritual by returning the familiar to passive mode with a minor action. If the familiar takes damage equal to 5 + one-half your level or more, it returns to its normal size and to passive mode.

However, since my character is a pixie and is therefore considered Tiny, I'm wondering if I would even need the Familiar Mount Ritual, as the Storm Falcon is considered Small and is thus bigger than me, so it should accommodate my size easily.

So in conclusion my question is this: Are there any rules I didn't consider or misinterpret for this matter? Because right now, it seems my Pixie would be able to mount and ride his Storm Talon without having to use either the ritual, saddles or anything in general.

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Related: Player characters as mounts –  BESW Jan 31 at 13:34
    
RAW, a creature must be at least Large size to be ridden (which is why Familiar Mount grows the familiar to Large). It doesn't make much sense that a horse takes up a 10x10 square, but 4e isn't about simulation. –  Brian S Jan 31 at 15:19
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@BrianS As it happens, the "at least large size to be ridden" was removed in the May 2010 Errata for the DMG. See: wizards.com/dnd/files/UpdateMay2010.pdf Page 9 –  FLClover Jan 31 at 15:47
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I stand corrected. Or ride, as the case may be! =) –  Brian S Jan 31 at 15:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

*You don't need the ritual, BUT*

There are no rules requiring you to take the ritual. You can ride your familiar as long as it's in active mode (it really doesn't make much sense for it to be ridden in passive mode). Though you might consult your DM about the fact that it only takes up the space of a tiny creature.

That said, your familiar is a minion by normal rules (it has 1 hit point, missed attack doesn't damage it, it'd destroyed if hit by an attack that does damage). So by making it your mount you risk it's destruction pretty regularly.

Basically, the benefit of the ritual to you is that your minion gets some more HP and isn't destroyed when damaged.

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I see, that makes a lot of sense. Regarding the ritual: The wording seems to me as if the familiar is only destroyed when it takes 5 + Half my level in one attack, so it wouldn't die if it takes 5 + Half my level damage over the course of several rounds? –  FLClover Jan 31 at 14:55
    
right,same rules as a shaman's spirit companion –  wax eagle Jan 31 at 15:03
    
@waxeagle What brings you to mention it only taking up the space of a tiny creature? Not being familiar with familiars, I might be missing something here, but mounts can take up more space than their rider. –  doppelgreener Jan 31 at 17:07
    
@JonathanHobbs the familiar takes up the same space as a tiny creature, even though it's size small. –  wax eagle Jan 31 at 19:28

RAW, you can ride any willing creature one size larger than you. Technically, a Halfling could use a Dwarven Fighter as a mount. So as long as your familiar is one size larger, you're good. (That's why the ritual makes it large - for medium-sized characters.)

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