Take the 2-minute tour ×
Role-playing Games Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for gamemasters and players of tabletop, paper-and-pencil role-playing games. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I start a Fae character with Hot 2, Cold -1, Volatile -1, Dark 1.

In play, I spend one of my advances on take "Add 1 to Dark (max 3)," bringing my Dark to 2.

A session later, we unlock Season Advances and I choose to "Change your character’s Skin" (pg. 38); let's say he becomes a Queen. You keep your stats, so I've still got Dark 2.

Now, my Queen sheet also has an entry for "Add 1 to Dark (max 3)." Do I mark this off because I've already taken it in the previous season, as a Fae? Or can I take it again (to raise my Dark to 3) now that I've become a Queen?

(Ditto can I use "Take a move from another Skin" on my new Skin checklist if I already used it twice previously before changing Skins?)

share|improve this question
    
I have no MH experience and I don't know if Joe changed this from Apocalypse World. But in AW, the advancement ticks are per playbook, not per character, so if you get a new playbook, you get its new set of advancement options fresh. –  SevenSidedDie Mar 5 at 16:39
1  
@SevenSidedDie I think you should make that an answer. The MH text straight-up quotes a large chunk of AW when explaining how to switch to a new Skins, so your Apocalypse World knowledge very much applies! –  Alex P Mar 5 at 16:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Each Skin has its own advancement list, so you can raise your Dark again after you've switched.

Parts of Monsterhearts are straight ports of Apocalypse World (MH p. 38 quotes AW p. 184 extensively), including the process of changing Skins, called Playbooks in AW parlance. In AW, when you change your Playbook you keep and lose various things (whatever is necessary to preserve your identity as established through play), especially your main stats, regardless of how they were acquired. Further, the advancement options are per Playbook, meaning that the advancement options are gained fresh along with the rest of the Playbook.

In part, that's why options that add to your stats specify a maximum—that option may be available in the new Playbook, but if you've already his this Playbook's maximum for that stat, you can't take it in practice. They're self-limiting in this way, which prevents fresh advancement options from being problems.

share|improve this answer
    
That last paragraph really makes it obvious: the game already has a clear mechanic for reining in stat advances, so there's no need to worry about players piling them on in long-term play. –  Alex P Mar 6 at 2:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.