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I'm running a new game, with just my friend and I on roll20. We're attempting to figure out the mechanics, while running a small game together.

I'm having issues with the Fate Point system. Does someone spend a Fate Point to "discover" an aspect? "It's stormy on the deck of this ship, there are dark clouds overhead this cultist should have a hard time identifying me. I should be able to get very close before he sees I'm not another cultist." The player spends a fate point, and discovers the aspect "Hard to see up here" as part of his sneaky attack.

Now, from what I gather he can still attack- because he didn't do the "Create Advantage" action, instead he discovered an aspect that's logical on a scene with "Dark and Stormy" on it. Now does he spend a FP to invoke that aspect?

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Please clarify what he did to actually discover the "Hard to see up here" aspect, because you didn't say. Did he spend a fate point? –  Jonathan Hobbs Jun 14 at 0:29
    
Actually, based on your comment below, I'm assuming yes and editing the question accordingly. –  Jonathan Hobbs Jun 14 at 0:43

1 Answer 1

I'm having issues with the Fate Point system. Does someone spend a Fate Point to "discover" an aspect?

Yes, you can spend a Fate point to "discover" an aspect. That's called Declaring a Story Detail.

That's not the only way to discover an aspect, though: you can also create an advantage, or use a stunt that creates aspects. One of the examples for Creating an Advantage with Crafts is "discovering" a vulnerability in a crafted work.

Now, from what I gather he can still attack- because he didn't do the "Create Advantage" action, instead he discovered an aspect that's logical on a scene with "Dark and Stormy" on it. Now does he spend a FP to invoke that aspect?

There answer here depends on the method he used to create the aspect.

He used a fate point to declare a story detail and get that aspect for free. That doesn't come with any free invocations, so he'll have to spend another fate point to invoke that aspect.

You might find that pretty hefty, but declaring a story detail is pretty powerful. You can create aspects your own stunts or skills don't allow you to create, and aspects are always true, which means the aspect can immediately begin to have mechanical and narrative impact. You just don't get a free invocation along with all of that: that would be effectively giving you a refund on your fate point, and make all that other stuff just happen for free.

If he had taken a turn to use Create an Advantage and succeeded, however, he would have received a free invocation on that aspect, or two if he succeeded with style. Then in his next turn, he could use a free invocation as part of his sneaky attack.

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Another alternative would be for the player to skip declaring the story detail entirely, and the GM to require a cultist's-Alertness-vs-player's-Deceit-or-Stealth contest to see if the cultist spots the player before the player attacks. Then "Dark and Stormy" could be invoked with a Fate for a +2-or-reroll on the stealth check, or later on the stealthy attack if the stealth check is successful. –  Paul Marshall Jun 14 at 1:20
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Just a summary from what I understand. Creating an Advantage means the new Aspect becomes a thing through character skill, whether you realize something through knowledge or observation or you fabricate it through action. Declaring an Aspect with a Fate Point is narrative power, it's meta and outside your character's control. "It's raining today". –  leokhorn Jun 14 at 9:32
    
@leokhorn Yes, that's a pretty good way to summarise it. In that example specifically, you might use Notice to observe it's raining today, but if for some reason you can't do that, it's totally appropriate to use a fate point instead to say it's raining at meta level. –  Jonathan Hobbs Jun 14 at 10:09

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