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I really like the idea of the magic item sets presented in the Magic Item Compendium (chapter 5), but have not found much like this in other 3.5e books. I've seen some in the Arms and Equipment Guide (which is 3.0, I know), but nowhere near as extensive as in the MIC. Are there any other books where I can find more of such sets?

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Magic Item Compendium Is a Latecomer to 3.5

It was published in 2007, one year before 4th edition came out. Sadly, the idea of sets never had the chance to firmly take root in 3.5 cannon, and I was not able to find another book that takes advantage of sets. Therefore, any list you find will not be in 3.5 cannon, and is either generated or home-brewed.

Generate Your Sets

3.5 has rules for generating magic items, and the Magic Item Compendium tells you what you need to make particular sets. This sets you up to use the rules (as far as they can apply) to make your own sets. Lacking the ease of a table, this liberates you to make whatever would be good for your character(s).

Home-Brew a Set

Possibly the most dangerous and least acceptable course is to simply concoct some sets of your own, using the relative powers and abilities of sets as a guide. You're likely better off just using the rules for magic item generation to make your sets, but if you're especially judicious and devoted to the idea of balance, you could make a good home-brewed set.

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Page 193 of the MIC mentions that the value of the bonus given at 2 items is about 10% of the value of the cheapest item, and after that they are "roughly 25% of the cost of the cheapest item or combination of items": does that mean that at say 4 items you should aim for 25% of the cheapest item, or that of all items? –  Thomas Jacobs Jun 19 at 18:30
    
It's pretty badly worded. I do believe that's is to determine the gp value of sets when they're assembled. So, two 100 gp items found together would have a total value of 210 gp when determining loot or selling it. (As opposed to the items costing or accounting for 110 gp each.) –  PipperChip Jun 19 at 18:39
    
"Possibly the most dangerous and least acceptable course is to simply concoct some sets of your own" -- I can't really agree that this is dangerous or unacceptable. If you homebrew content and it is unbalanced, you can simply change it. :) –  starwed Jun 19 at 18:55

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