Take the 2-minute tour ×
Role-playing Games Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for gamemasters and players of tabletop, paper-and-pencil role-playing games. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To be more specific, and add context, I started out the process of making a Pathfinder character with three major goals for the character: One, to acquire either a single wish, or possibly three wishes, and get a clone of the character that was active, and the same in every way possible save for offering different solutions to problems. Two, to use Daggers and Static Electricity to De-fibrillate another character. Three, to Counter-Spell a Dragon's Breath weapon. After doing some research, I found out that according to Rules as Written, I cannot counter-spell a Dragon's Breath Weapon, but, I was wondering if there was any ways to protect your character from a Dragon's Breath Weapon, aside from saving rolls to reduce damage.

Things like energy immunities are kinda obvious, but not outside the realm of possibility, clearly. Another possibility I considered was cover, BUUUT, I was wondering if there was other options?

Edit: One thing I forgot to mention is that I would like to find a way to save more than my own character. If possible, I'd like to find a way to be able to keep the rest of my Party from getting cooked alive, frozen solid, zapped to powder, etc. etc.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Artifacts & Legends has just what you're looking for! Unfortunately, as the book's title suggests, orbs of dragonkind are artifacts, and not generally available. Among many other benefits, they confer the following:

A character possessing an Orb of Dragonkind is immune to the breath weapon—but only the breath weapon—of the dragon variety keyed to the orb.

Of course, this only works against one specific breed of dragon, based on the orb's type (black dragon orb, brass dragon orb, etc.). Further, orbs of dragonkind can be used, as a standard action, to dominate all dragons of the appropriate style within 500 ft, with only a Will save to resist, and suffering from no spell resistance.

Breath weapons in general, though? You'll want energy resistances, save bonuses, Evasion, Mettle, death ward, and the favour of the dice gods. Having elf immunities couldn't hurt, either, if you expect to be facing brass dragons.

share|improve this answer
    
Protecting more of the Party would be cool, but I get the feeling that with an Orb of Dragon Kind(As far as I've read from the AD&D version), that'd be fairly easy to accomplish. Still, other options that don't require questing to the edges of Golarion would be of great interest to me. –  Tarmikos11 Sep 5 at 11:43

Not sure if you consider this obvious: Most breath weapons demand a reflex save, and thus Evasion and Improved Evasion is one way to avoid damage. Add to that the Lightning Reflexes and Improved Lightning Reflexes feats and a high dexterity score. Also, gear up with a high-powered Amulet of Resistance plus Boots of Speed, and you've got a character which most dragons can breathe at all day and still not scorch.

Update: From comments I've learned that some dragons can use breath demanding a fortitude or will save. This, of course, subtracts from the effectiveness of my evasion-reflex suggestion. Thanks for the input!

share|improve this answer
1  
Now comes the fun bit, finding those items! Regardless, thanks for the advice. Time to become the Party's Dragon Diplomat. –  Tarmikos11 Sep 5 at 12:08
    
@Metool, sorry I wasn't aware that there were any? Are there dragons where the breath save type is Will? –  thomax Sep 7 at 19:00
    
@Metool thanks, I've update the answer. –  thomax Sep 8 at 6:40
    
@thomax: This is kind of what I was getting at with my comments in the response above. –  Paul Sep 9 at 11:18

Duck and cover.

Total cover gives you immunity from almost all breath weapons. Improved cover gives you +4 Reflex and Improved Evasion against the typical cone/line breath weapons that many dragons have. Even normal cover gives you +2.

Tower shield is one way to get cover. You can use ready action and then have it give you total cover against the triggering breath weapon attack. Conjuring up some kind of wall could also work and even cover multiple creatures.

Beware: spread effects, like the acid cloud of a green dragon will ignore cover, except for total cover that has no way around it, AKA being in an airtight box. Or another room, I suppose.

share|improve this answer

If you are strictly looking for defense to get past or away from the dragon a Wall of force could be your answer. There is also a prismatic wall or sphere if you want protection and to still be able to battle the dragon. If you need to protect a party member that is in trouble Resilient Sphere may be something you might consider while you draw the dragon's attention elsewhere. These all withstand everything except Rod of cancellation, rod of negation, disintegrate, anti-magic, Disjunction or dispel magic. These are methods of helping to protect your party instead of just yourself. You might even use a Windwall to deflect the breath. Things like pepia sigil or entomb might also work.

Reflex saves don't help the rest of the party even improving DEX of giving bonuses to everyones reflex saves they will still take damage unless everyone has Improved Evasion and gets a successful save. Improved saves, resistances and immunity all are good and yo uprobably want all you can get going in, but they still reduce not eliminate the party taking damaage. Walls and spheres can block the breath from ever getting there.

The most obvious answer would be kill the dragon, but not a practical answer since you have to get by the breath to do that. Someone might try binding the Dragons mouth closed as a more mundane method of stopping the breath attack.

share|improve this answer

This may be a bit obvious, but you can be protected from a breath weapon just by not being hit by it...

Spread the party out so it cannot hit multiple people at once, hide behind a pillar, use evasion and improved evasion to dodge it, get items that allow you to teleport out of the way, etc.

share|improve this answer

Outside of the more obvious suggestions here involving magic items or even artifacts... I have seen some interesting ideas tried out. As a DM I have often awarded bonus to people who prepared for the fight. A barbarian covered in blubber and extra layers might lose a few points of dex, but gain to saves involving cold damage. It's a trade-off. I had a team that fancies themselves dragon hunters and sought out relevant immunities, and found out that a charm against a red dragon's breath does nothing if the dragon cast a fireball or used other attacks.

As for your original objective of counter-spelling a breath weapon, the obvious answer is, it's not magic. Now, you could place enchantments and contingency spells to account for all the situations. Or you could spend one of your wishes on immunity to dragons' breath and die to a gorgon. But honestly, any time a player reaches the 'immunity to everything' phase of their life, it is time to retire. So really it's between you and your DM. I rarely like handing out blanket immunity to a player and any intelligent monster (most dragons rank in at Genius levels) will quickly stop using an ineffective attack and go for other attacks (the 'stepping on people' example is a classic).

It is usually assumed in D&D that the concussive blast of most magic/breath weapons is included in the normal damage for simplicity, but that does not mean that a fire explosion does not toss a player around or break glass from a lightning bolt passing inches by. However there is a dragon from AD&D 2ed that is very relevant here. The Amethyst dragon was always a favorite and is the only dragon that has NO resistance to its own breath weapon since the weapon was a concussive projectile. No elemental resistance would apply since it was only concussive force.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! As the question-asker's potential GM, this answer interests me, but I feel like it might be a bit of work to port something from 2E to Pathfinder. –  Metool Sep 8 at 9:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.