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Title. Can you use Invisibility, grab some gold, and have it then be invisible? Or does it only work on items on your person when the spell is cast?

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related (see first answer) rpg.stackexchange.com/q/77119/23970 – nitsua60 Mar 26 at 0:18
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, the rule about this is a little ambiguous.

Anything the target is wearing or carrying is invisible as long as it is on the target’s person.

This has 2 interpretations that are, as far as I can tell, equally valid.

  1. Anything the target is wearing or carrying at the time you cast the spell is invisible as long as it is on the target’s person.

  2. Anything the target is wearing or carrying at any point throughout the spell's duration is invisible as long as it is on the target’s person.

Luckily, someone has asked Jeremy Crawford, official source of rules interpretation for D&D 5e, and he says that it is the first one.

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You could, however, put coins in your currently invisible coin pouch, and then ask if the invisibility is like camo and covers them, or xray and makes them float – Nemenia Mar 26 at 0:58
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Fortunately, the rule is a little ambiguous. ;-) – KorvinStarmast Mar 26 at 1:06
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@Nemenia From what Crawford says that should work. – Miniman Mar 26 at 1:12
    
"Only items worn/carried when invisibility is cast are invisible, but I'd let you conceal something under them." This answer needs to be more clear about the conceal part. Include it in your answer that if you pick up a coin it's still visible, but if you put it in your pocket it turns invisible. (it was the same in 3.5). Your answer is also needlessly confusing, you could use a better format and language. – Simanos May 27 at 9:52

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