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Paragon Tier wildblood wardens have a feat, wildblood speed:

Benefit: When any enemy marked by you makes an attack that doesn’t include you as a target, you can shift a number of squares equal to your Wisdom modifier as a free action.

and Warden's Fury, their primary mark punishment:

Immediate Interrupt Melee weapon

Trigger: An enemy marked by you makes an attack that does not include you as a target

Can the free action occur before the interrupt?

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Warden's Fury must always take place before the shift from Wildblood speed.

Warden's Fury is an immediate interrupt that triggers off of certain attacks.

Wildblood speed allows a shift as a free action triggering off of the same attacks.

From the compendium on immediate actions:

Interrupt: An immediate interrupt lets you jump in when a certain trigger condition arises, acting before the trigger resolves

[...]

Reaction: An immediate reaction lets you act in response to a trigger. The triggering action, event, or condition occurs and is completely resolved before you take your reaction

And from the Rules Compendium p197:

Other Triggered Effects: If an effect has a trigger but is neither an immediate action nor an opportunity action, assume that it behaves like an immediate reaction, waiting for its trigger to completely resolve. However, ignore this guideline when the effect has to interrupt its trigger to function.

So, Warden's Fury triggers before the attack actually occurs and the Wildblood speed shift triggers after the attack occurs.

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This does seem to be the common ruling, do you have a cite for free as immediate reaction? The rules compendium cites from GMNoob look persuasive as a change in that ruling. –  Brian Ballsun-Stanton Jun 23 '11 at 3:25
    
Agreed. The key to this is the wording. Interrupts and reactions actually become a part of an action and will resolve with it. New actions (even free ones) have to come after the whole triggering action is complete. –  WayneDenier Jun 23 '11 at 4:04
    
Sorry, I dissagree. The wording here is "lets you" not "you must". Meaning, you can do these things in any order that you like. The "new action" that you are speaking of IS a "reaction" its not a new thing. –  GMNoob Jun 23 '11 at 6:43
    
@Brian - Free as an immediate reaction is the 1st sentence of what GMNoob quoted from the RC: "Other Triggered Effects: If an effect has a trigger but is neither an immediate action nor an opportunity action, assume that it behaves like an immediate reaction, waiting for its trigger to completely resolve." –  Simon Withers Jun 23 '11 at 20:24
    
@GMNoob - I agree that "lets you" means you have choice to jump in or not, but I don't see how that can be read as allowing you to interrupt after the trigger resolves for an interrupt, as it explicitly says "before the trigger resolves". –  Simon Withers Jun 23 '11 at 20:30
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Yes, I can't remember the exact phrasing, but I remember being a bit surprised when reading the essentials rule book on this topic.

It says that interruptions, free actions, etc can happen in any order. It also said that at the end of a turn when you are doing saving throws and status effects stop, that they also can be done in any order.

Releavant quotes from the Rules Compendium:

Other Triggered Effects: If an effect has a trigger but is neither an immediate action nor an opportunity action, assume that it behaves like an immediate reaction, waiting for its trigger to completely resolve. However, ignore this guideline when the effect has to interrupt its trigger to function. For instance, if a triggered power alllows an adventurer to use a free action to reroll an attack roll, with the hope of turning a miss into a hit, the power must interupt the trigger ("You miss with an attack") to function: otherwise th attack would be resolved as a miss.

Immediate Reactions: An immediate reaction lets a creature act in response to a trigger. the triggering action or vent occurs and is completely resolved before the reaction takes place. An immediate reaction waits for its trigger to finish, not necessarily for the action that contains the trigger to finish. (Examples follow)

Then, within the "The Structure of A Turn" section, it lists all the things you can do at various parts of the turns... here is the relevant bits:

The Start of a Turn : Any Order: The creature can choose the order in which things happen at the start of its turn. For instance, if the creature has regeneration ans is taking ongoing damage, it can choose to take the ongoing damage n then use its regeneration or the other way around.

The Actions of a Turn: Any Order: the creature can take its actions in any order and can skip any of them

The end of a turn: Any Order: The creature can choose the order in which things happen at the end of its turn. For instance, if the creature has saving throws to make and is subjected to an effect that damages it at the end of its turn, the creature can choose to take the damage and then make the saving throws or the other way around

Then, for Free Actions it says:

Free actions take almost no time or effort. A creature can usually take as many free >actions as it wants during any turn, including other creatures turns. Examples: ....

Then..

There is an exception to this rule: A creatre can take a free action to us an attack power only once per turn. Example...

TL:DR

In Summary, the free action of the Wildblood speed, effectively acts as an immediate reaction, but it is only a guideline and isn't exactly the same, since its a free action. For example, which can be done before the Action which triggered it is complete, but only after the trigger itself takes place. The Mark itself, is able to be fired before the trigger even takes place if it so desires, however it does not have to, and these things can be done in any order.

As an aside... Be happy that wildblood speed is a free action and not labeled an immediate reaction, because you are only allowed to do one immediate action (interrupt, ready, or reaction) per turn.

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