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Does that affect the floor of the castle or just the ground where the castle is floating on?

Does it depend on what the caster wants?

Does it depend on if the caster can/cannot see the "real ground"?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Considering it causes a highly localized tremor, I don't see why it wouldn't work on a floating castle. Magic!

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Maybe you have it out of context... it says When you cast earthquake, an intense but highly localized tremor rips the ground. What is the ground? If you are at a balcony of the floating castle, will you be seeing the spell modifing the ground below the castle? –  apacay Jul 22 '11 at 16:42
    
Range is 400+ feet, so if you can see the base of the castle I would consider as the ground for this purpose. Area is 80-foot-radius spread. Any half-decent castle will count as a Structure. I would probably disallow casting earthquake targeted on a non-ground floor—that seems against the intent of the spell. –  okeefe Jul 22 '11 at 18:15
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So you can't cast earthquake on the castle from the solid ground(even if it's in range). And this has to do with the visualization of the character... –  apacay Jul 22 '11 at 18:32
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I think it would depend on what the castle is floating on. If it has a chunk of ground it is floating on then its pretty simple. If it is supported in some way that is not affected by the ground far below then earthquake is not going to be an effective spell. –  Chad Jul 25 '11 at 16:03
    
Selected as answer for the comment discussion =) –  apacay Aug 28 '11 at 18:30
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Looks like there's nothing written that says whether it can or can't. So let the player justify it, and let the DM decide.

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