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Hopefully this is a relatively straightforward question. I am used to playing 3.5e, and we recently switched to pathfinder. I had thought that taking any more than a single attack would require a full-attack action. However, as I was browsing through the Pathfinder SRD today, I saw this:

If you wield a second weapon in your off hand, you can get one extra attack per round with that weapon...

Does this mean that I can attack once with my main hand, and once with my off-hand as a single standard action?

Thanks!

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No. You get an extra attack from the off hand, but it is not an exception time-wise to the general rule:

Multiple Attacks

A character who can make more than one attack per round must use the full-attack action (see Full-Round Actions) in order to get more than one attack.

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If i remember correctly that you would need a feat or 2 to do more than 2 attacks when dual wielding, and it was dependent on 1 stat. unless they changed it i ver 4. I used to have a character that could do 3 attacks offhand 1 main hand but incurs a -1 or -2 penalty every time i attack. If you want more attacks you can get cleave as well when you kill the first opponent you can attack a 2nd opponent that's 5 feet away from the 1st opponent. If you kill that as well you can go to the next opponent as well but the number of times you can do this is also dependent on another stat. Hope this helped. :)

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Hey @RP21, appreciate the initiative, but on RPG.SE answers are expected to be specifically addressing the question asked - it's a lot less like a forum where tangential discussion is encouraged. –  mxyzplk Aug 12 '11 at 16:14
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