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Duelist's Prowess Reads

Effect: Until the stance ends, each time an enemy hits or misses you, you can use the Duelist's Prowess Attack power against it.

But then the associated power is an immediate interrupt. It seems like the words "each time" and the power type "immediate interrupt" are incompatible. (DDI)

What is the proper interpretation here? As DM my ruling was to change the power type to Opportunity action, however that doesn't resolve the RAW case.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It appears to me, that you can only use the attack power once per round.

The effect says 'each time... you can'. Meaning it's an option available to you. But the attack power itself means that it can only happen once per round.

I would suggest eratta on this, as it seems poorly worded. :)
However it might be correct because the effect is the effect that gives you a new power while the stance exists. It doesn't mean that you can always use that power since the power is written in a way which says you can't.

i.e. the power itself, is a specific rule, which override the general rule of 'each time.. etc.'

The chain of actions goes like this:

Evoke daily:

  1. Adjacent enemy 1 attacks. Attempt to use Deulist's prowess. Done.
  2. Adjacent enemy 2 attacks. Attempt to use Deulist's prowess.. power usage is blocked by fact that it is only an immediate interrupt and can only be done once per round. However the stance is still active.
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Dont forget Specific Beats General rule. By that rule, it should be activated each time you are attacked.

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1  
The power type of immediate interrupt overrules the "each time" –  wax eagle Apr 12 '13 at 10:28
    
Does it? Wouldn't a term that covers all actions of a certain type be considered general and the effects of one particular power be specific and thus overrule the restriction? –  Mitharlic Aug 21 '13 at 16:20

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