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10

I don't believe the rules ever formally state what exactly is or is not "ground." With that said, here's what I would use to evaluate this: Does the item have a large enough surface area to support the disk? Does the item have a reasonably uniform surface? (i.e. not someone's head and shoulders, not steeply angled, etc.). How much weight can the item ...


8

"The ground" counts as the ground for Tenser's Floating Disk. It can't be tricked, exploited, or fooled, because it's magic and not physics.


8

The two together occupy the same space (in all dimensions) as the mount alone. Source - Rules Compendium p253, also the Compendium Also, note that the previous page states that the mount must be at least one size category larger than the rider.


7

The disc always floats 1 foot off the ground. The rules say: You create a slightly concave, circular plane of force that floats a foot off the ground and can carry what you lay upon it. The disk is 3 feet in diameter and 1 inch deep at its center. It remains stationary unless you move more than 5 squares away from it, in which case it moves with your ...


6

While there is no requirement that walls be anchored to the ground As @JeremiahGenest notes, there is no requirement that a wall be anchored to the ground unless otherwise noted. See Wall of StoneDDI for an example of a wall that does need to be anchored. However your plan for a roof composed of a Wall of BladesDDI may not work as you hoped. Walls ...


6

From page 200 of the Essentials Rules Compendium: Space: A creature's space is the area, measured in squares, that the creature occupies on the battle grid. This area represents the three-dimensional space that the creature needs to take part in an encounter, allowing it to turn around, attack, fall prone, and so on. Despite the cubic shape of its ...


5

The official rules for aerial combat can be found here. They are, I warn you, fairly complicated, and can be a real headache to run. I personally hate them. So much so that I’ve created an abstract flight houserule, which eliminates most of the “3D-ness.” It is admittedly abstract – there are corner cases where this flight rule ...


5

The Ground is the Battle Map. While this answer will not satisfy the simulationists out there, it is probably the unspoken principle upon which D&D 4E, a combat-heavy system, is designed around. All the descriptions of various things that I've read talk about things that could be "on the ground" or are different from ground. For example, Tremorsense ...


4

By rule, all small and medium creatures occupy the same 5x5x5 block an take no penalties as long as they have that amount of clearance. The relevant rules are on pg199 of the Rules Compendium.


3

I'd say the ground under the disk does need to be able to support the disk - it's meant to be read as an "effectively infinite" source of upward force. But, I'd say it doesn't need to be uniform or such. It's essentially a hovercart - it can detect the force it's applying to things on it, apply the necessary counterforce to keep them from falling off, and ...


3

The fundamental trick is that 4e is 2 dimensional. All of its wording uses the term "squares" rather than cubes. While there are concessions to the z-axis, it is not considered an inherent aspect of the game when dealing with, for example, character height. As squeezing notes: Smaller Space: A Large, Huge, or Gargantuan creature reduces its space by 1. ...


2

(Asking cust service, my reading is that the "up to 4 squares high" wording suggests that it must be based on the battlefield, but I couldn't find anything on the forums to support either side.) Here is the question I sent to them, I will update with their responses.: I am trying to answer a question on http://rpg.stackexchange.com/q/3627/760 about ...


2

There are lots of ways to adjudicate this. As always, it helps to have a rationale so you can sort out the effects of unplanned events quickly and consistently. We've struggled with this in a number of different systems for years, but I'll give you the two easiest mechanisms to GM that we've used. If you treat phasing as a form of limited dimensional ...


2

There is an excellent article here which clarified all you need to know about aerial combat and how difficult it is.


1

I would rule that large creatures usually occupy cubic space. Not only does it make more sense it also makes tactical combat more interesting in situations where height matters.


1

I assume that they are filling cubic space for the most part. A longer creature might not be as tall as the creature is long. If the tunnel was wide enough, though it seems like the monster could crawl.



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