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29

There are conditions that prevent characters from taking actions altogether (stunned, unconscious, dying, etc). This prevents free actions, but a "No Action" power could still be used. Also note that most powers that enhance your initiative are No Action because you are using them before combat technically begins. For example, a Deva could use the Memory of ...


27

In general, you have a number of options - some need more preplanning however. Doctor, It Hurts When I Do That If characters are frequently getting caught in situations where they don't have anything to do, they are not playing the long game very smart. They should consider these times in builds, when purchasing magic items, etc. "Oh I'm a melee guy if ...


27

According to The ever useful d20PFSRD: In a round of combat, you can do either : 1 Full-round action OR 1 Standard action plus 1 Move action (in any order) OR 2 Move actions (effectively trading your Standard action for a Move action) Plus a combination of : 1 Swift or Immediate Action AND Any number of Free Actions A few special cases The 5 ft. ...


19

The short answer is that you are right. In your turn you may make 1 standard action and a move action, or a full round action, along with one or more free actions - source A single attack is a standard action, as is using an ability. When used as such you get a single standard action, plus a move. That means you can only use your ability once per round ...


18

Swift actions, like Free actions, take place during your turn, and cannot be taken outside your turn. Immediate actions take place outside your turn, and use up your next turn’s Swift action. So no, you must activate that bonus on your turn in order to have it for the round, you cannot try to activate it just when you need to.


17

Through inference, there is no action cost for controlling facing. The SRD presents a combat facing "add-on" that states: The standard d20 combat rules intentionally ignore the direction a creature faces. The rules assume that creatures are constantly moving and shifting within their spaces, looking in all directions during a fight. In this variant, ...


15

It's really the rules as written. The spell charges your hand with energy, you move, and then release it as an attack. You can also take a 5' step between iterative attacks, so this isn't some weird isolated thing. The idea of standard actions, full actions, and the like are abstractions that exist for game balance reasons; they're not supposed to ...


12

No, a standard action cannot bisect a move action. Each action must be fully resolved before you can begin another action (aside from triggered actions). However, you can use them in any order you like: attack, then move; or move before attacking. There are specific powers and features which provide exceptions to this rule.


12

No, a full round action does not equal two standard actions. It takes place instead of all actions on your turn (except free actions). From Actions in Combat on the d20srd: Full-Round Action A full-round action consumes all your effort during a round. The only movement you can take during a full-round action is a 5-foot step before, during, or ...


12

Not normally. As Colin explained, attacking and using a breath weapon are both standard actions. You can't normally take two standard actions in a round, and you can't substitute a move action for a standard action. You can however take the Metabreath Feat Quicken Breath (Draconomicon). That lets you use your breath attack as a free action, which would let ...


11

Yes. They can be performed during the same round and during the same turn. An Opportunity Attack is defined as: OPPORTUNITY ATTACK: OPPORTUNITY ACTION ... One per Combatant’s Turn: You can take only one opportunity action during another combatant’s turn, but you can take any number during a round. ... Interrupts Target’s Action: An ...


11

D&D is a game of exceptions. You must use your Str modifier to hit with a melee weapon, unless you're wielding a light weapon and you have the Weapon Finesse feat. Weapon Finesse only works with light weapons, but there are some weapons that explicitly work as if they were light only for Weapon Finesse purposes (like the rapier). Your full round ...


11

That is correct. You get either a full-round action, or one each of a standard and a move. A second move can be substituted in place of the standard, but a second standard cannot be substituted for the move. Here's a complete overview of action types, as well as a nifty overview of what action is of which type.


10

According to the DMG... Probably not. "Gotcha!" Abilities: Pay attention to monster abilities that change the basic rules and tactics of combat and give players the cues they need to recognize them. Describe the ability as it might appear in the game world, and then describe it in game terms to make it clear. For example, if the characters are ...


10

In general, it is a standard action to remove your shield from your arm. From the Rules Compendium pg 267: Using a Shield To use a shield, a creature must strap it to the forearm. Doing so is a standard action, unless otherwise noted. Removing a shield is also a standard action. If you choose to remove and stow it on your backpack, that is ...


10

No, you cannot activate more than one Power per turn. Activating a Power is seen as a single generic action, and as you cannot use the same action twice in a turn, you cannot activate two Powers in the same turn. See here for official confirmation of this. However, there is nothing stopping you activating Smite on one turn and then Deflection the next, ...


10

There are two forms of Target Number rolled against in the Serenity RPG: Fixed Difficulty values (p. 141) set by rules and/or the GM. Note that p. 141 lists 8 labeled difficulties with fixed TN's. Opposed Rolls (p. 143) Someone else's skill roll is the TN. Most combat rolls are opposed; your TN is a roll by the opponent. If the opponent can't, won't or ...


10

Yes. Since it doesn't specify the type of action, I'd have to assume that you can. The official FAQ has some relevant guidance (p.94) -- it discusses what counts as a "purely mental" action. In addition to spell-like abilities and spells without any components, it includes: Concentrating to maintain a spell. Dismissing a spell. Directing or ...


9

Seeing as the combat is in hand the bard could focus on doing something non combat related. Some suggestions are: Start searching the room (you never know when you might turn up a secret door) Search/loot the fallen opponents if any Peer into the next room Otherwise as others have said Ready an Action, Delay etc and hope the situation changes. In our ...


9

You are right. A high BAB does not grant additional standard actions in a combat round. The logical error he (perhaps understandably) makes is that he assumes that it being possible to take an attack as a standard action implies that you can take a standard action in place of an attack (or "attack action" as the term is sometimes used). But it doesn't. ...


7

Most free actions must occur on your turn, so no, the Dwarf cannot draw his shield I quoted 3.5 in the other question, but since you're not interested in that, I'll stick with a reading of the Pathfinder PRD: Combat Round: In a normal round, you can perform a standard action and a move action, or you can perform a full-round action. You can also ...


6

If we take this as the literal case, where there is absolutely nothing else, the Aid Another combat option is always available, and always fairly useful. Try to get into flanking position, use Aid Another, and allow the Rogue to hit more with his Sneak Attack or the Barbarian to safely use more Power Attack.


6

No, but... As Jonathan Hobbs points out, a full-round action takes up your whole round, but you can spend a standard action to start or complete selected full-round actions. Not all full-round actions are available, and the caveat is that you have to complete it on the following round (not in the same round). Start/Complete Full-Round Action The ...


6

If you think of this in terms of what is happening in 6 seconds, and less about in-game actions it might make a little more sense to you. At the start of the round you begin casting a spell. That as you complete the spell the magic infuses your hands (or whatever instrument you intend to use to deliver the spell) and you move towards your intended victim (as ...


6

A move action simply does not take as long as a standard action. You can turn a standard action into a move action, simply giving up however much extra time the standard action would have taken, but you cannot do the reverse because it would take more time. How much time is explicitly left undefined. The whole round is roughly six seconds, with everyone ...


6

Assuming that a swift action can be taken any time you could take a free action, we must determine when you can take a free action. As the PRD suggests, speaking is a non-standard free action: In general, speaking is a free action that you can perform even when it isn't your turn. From this, we can assume that a free action, and thus also a swift ...


5

The trigger for a readied action is an Immediate Action. If you have used your Immediate action prior to the readied trigger then you are out of luck. Immediate Reaction: A readied action is an immediate reaction. It takes place after your enemy completes the action that triggers it. DelayDDI is a NO ACTION. You must delay your entire turn. This ...


5

note: This answer was to a rather differently worded question. Here are a few RAW ways the bard could help: You only need to be able to make a melee attack on the creature to use the aid another action in combat. Use an improvised reach weapon -- a long pole, or perhaps even a rock tied to a piece of rope. You could even just use a plain piece of rope; ...


5

The SRD description of an immediate action says you can perform an immediate action at "any time", but this has some logical limitations. The most common interpretation is that the last chance you have to declare an immediate action to interrupt another event is after the event you are responding to has been declared, but before it has been resolved. You ...


5

The Haste spell seems to be a special exception in this circumstance. The regular version explicitly grants an extra attack in addition to a full attack, which is a full-round action. This Perpetual Options-upgraded Haste permits you to perform a move/standard action explicitly in addition to a full-round action or full attack, which would normally use up ...



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