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46

I believe it is a matter of story, and less a matter of mechanics. Mechanically, any monster, any NPC, any curse, any trap, anything the players encounter will have a solution, a stat to beat, and you as the GM would have calculated their chances and deemed it possible for them to defeat (speaking in generalities) The way to make the Undead scary is not to ...


18

Stats for purchased dogs The dog available for purchase from a kennel, as listed in the equipment chapter, has the statistics of a war dog in the Monster Manual or Monstrous Manual under Dog, and is a little bit beefier than a wild dog. The difference between the three is in what they are trained to be able to do, not in their statistics. Dogs don't gain ...


17

Outside of Combat If the characters have different skill-sets (i.e., there's one mage, one cleric, one thief, and one fighter in the group), then you can tailor your non-combat encounters to scale to the skills that are in play. Somebody brought a master thief? Then the locks and traps are suddenly masterwork. Only a first-level thief? Then the locks and ...


16

Maps are fun. Make maps when you want to. You don't have to map anything, ever. But you'll want to, because maps are fun. Maps are just another tool that you have as DM to convey information to the players. When you want to convey something that is best done spatially, a map is useful. Personally, I find I often sketch very rough maps all the time during ...


16

Because they are silly and ridiculous in a game setting where players generally try to take the fictional world seriously. It was part of an unfortunate trend at the time to put things that were generally considered "silly" into otherwise coherent milieus - the greater outrage was a year earlier when WG7 Castle Greyhawk turned out to be a huge megamodule ...


15

Resolve the Dramatic Conflict Whether this will work for you depends entirely on your GM and how he sees the Ravenloft setting. One interpretation is that people are drawn through the mists to take part in a mystery play that shows them and the Lord the consequences of that Lord's evil. The only way out of a domain in this case is to finish the play. A ...


15

Planescape: Torment is based on Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Second Edition from the 1990s. THAC0, for example, only exists in that edition and a couple contemporary D&D editions (very late AD&D 1e and Basic supplements) - it's not a term found in other games. Armor Class doesn't work the same across D&D editions, let alone other tabletop ...


14

Go wander outside your house or apartment or whatever and look for a wooded area. Write down a description of it. You've created an environment, then when you read that to your players, they are in it. Does it have corridors or rooms? No. It might have paths, and clearings that might make good places to have something happen, but the outdoors largely ...


14

As you say, this is how Green Slime is presented in the DMG (3.5e p77, 3.0 p117). Note that Green Slime is considered a hazard, much like a flow of lava, raging river, or 40' pit would be a hazard. Green slime is green slime. Does the module say the slime is invisible? That the players can't see it? Is there an illusory wall or darkness spell concealing ...


14

Major Differences the list of classes the presumption of Non-Weapon Proficiencies Advancement of Thief Skills nature of Bards Kits Specialist Mages Clerics THAC0 Psionics The list of Classes AD&D 1E Core: Assassin, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Illusionist, Paladin, Ranger, Thief, Wizard. Bard is special, see below. AD&D 1E+ UA: Assassin, Barbarian, ...


13

No. The spell stoneskin (PHB p. 163) says in no uncertain terms that the target of the spell is completely immune to physical attacks, specifically including magically-enhanced physical attacks such as from a sword of sharpness. The vorpal sword's description even says that it is just like the sword of sharpness, except with a better bonus. The way to ...


13

There are major differences, but nothing too insurmountable. AD&D 1E adds non-weapon proficiencies in DSG, WSG, and OA, while they are core in AD&D 2E 2E allows points to be spread amongst thief skills, rather than using a fixed table per skill. 2E groups classes differently, and lacks the assassin and monk. Minor differences in several tables ...


13

Fights aren't played out on grids. Well, they are played out on grids, on tables - but in "real" life they take place in dungeons and swamps and forests. Use this to your advantage. Make one fight in a tight hallway so your players have a hard time maneuvering or are trapped between two sides. This makes your players change tactics between fights. If you ...


13

You're asking the wrong question, "maximum level" is irrelevant. It assumes a max level 2e character is calibrated with a max level Pathfinder character, which they're not, and that there is a maximum level, which there's not - see 2e DMG Chapter 3, "Above 20th Level," there is no cap in 2e. Your real question is "What level Pathfinder PCs are appropriately ...


13

Lots of classes in older D&D were not balanced to each other, and not balanced at every level of play. One of the main advantages that 2E monks had with the wacky unarmed combat tables was decent odds of getting knockouts or stuns - they had better chance of bumping up and down the results on the table, giving you some advantage there or of ...


12

No rules changed in that run. The only things changed were trade dress, layout, artwork, (the interior artwork is just as bad as the covers), and possibly some trivial copyediting of language that didn't affect the rules, though I never actually noticed any text changes. There is a grain of truth to the "edition 2.5" though: that trade dress was introduced ...


12

I think the two things you have to do "manually" are monsters and treasure conversion, which will actually probably be more of a "re-imagining" than a conversion. That can be fairly labor intensive, though, and I don't know a way around it. Using the compendium and monster builder can definitely help in tracking down and/or creating equivalent monsters, ...


12

They fall. A spell's entry, plus the general rules for spells, together give a complete description of how it changes reality. AD&D spells tend to be very open to creative use, by extrapolating logical consequences from the effects a spell describes, but there's no rules or tradition support for extrapolating extra reality-changing effects than those ...


12

The key to fear is the unknown. It is familiarity that breeds the complacency you see. So, in your case, do not use creatures your players know. And give the ones they do know different, unexpected abilities. I once ran a campaign where my personal rule was to never use a monster out of the book. There were certain ecological niches - the orc niche, the ...


12

I played many years of 2e and have read the 5e PHB, Basic set, and Hoard of the Dragon Queen, so I think I can give some good points of comparison. (I'm excluding the Skills & Powers stuff in late 2e from this discussion, that was less like 2e than many other versions of D&D...) There are definitely similarities between 2e and 5e — mostly conceptual ...


11

Apparently there was an entire book on the topic of Krynnspace. There's since been a fan book updating that material. The Dragonlance FAQ confirms the connection. So Krynn looks pretty accessible, assuming you want that in your game.


11

20th Level Alchemists in Pathfinder have the option of taking eternal youth as the Grand Discovery capstone ability. Eternal Youth: The alchemist has discovered a cure for aging, and from this point forward he takes no penalty to his physical ability scores from advanced age. If the alchemist is already taking such penalties, they are removed at ...


11

I can't check on it from work, but this post (about Baldur's Gate, of all things...) seems to confirm that, although the PHB does technically allow ranger/druids, it was only in the Complete expansions that the alignment conflict was corrected. The post also implies this requires a Neutral Good alignment. Turns out the information about this combination is ...


11

I emailed Eliezer Yudkowsky, the author of HPMOR -- this was his response: I didn't have three exact items in mind. The well-knownness of the Candle of Invocation hack using only one item dates to after Harry's time. So I think that's going to be as good as we can get. Now let us give thanks to Eliezer for taking the time to respond to such a ...


11

Undefined and up to the DM. This is a feature, not a bug! In AD&D, both editions, magic items are the exclusive domain of the DM and they are given full rein in deciding how they work, which is to say: If you're the DM, the game doesn't care, so make up whatever sounds good. If you're a player, you have to ask your DM, or (more likely) experiment with ...


10

It's quite possible that I'm not taking advantage of my abilities, but what I got from our DM was "since you're a hero, no backstabbing'. I would tactfully try to convince the GM that you agree no backstabbing. However lets look at the backstabbing mechanic more as a sneaky attack. You dive between the enemies legs with your attack and the additional ...


10

Typically, the only way to faithfully "convert" a character from one system to another very different system is to re-imagine them as a new character made from scratch in the new system. Ironically, trying to convert them by-the-numbers is likely to be less faithful than a character created from scratch in their image. There are parts of AD&D 2e that ...


10

Your example sans thief is answered on page 34: “Not all mythoi are opposed to the shedding of blood. Indeed, some require their priests to use swords, spears, or other specific weapons. A war deity might allow his priests to fight with spears or swords.” It then gives a list of suggested deities (by “mythoi”, by which they mean things like “death”, “hunt” ...


9

I don't think there's a quick fix, but I do think it's something you can do on the fly once you've got some practice. The idea is to used the 3.5 material as a guide for what to put into the game rather than as a (more, or less) strict recipe for the adventure. For fights, it depends on how you run your AD&D. If you don't worry about encounter balance ...


9

I'm afraid there's just no way for a party to escape Ravenloft if their DM doesn't want them to leave. There are no mechanics that could get you out of there without your DM's approval, and, in game, there are no known and not even remotely reliable methods - no spells, no special abilities, no nothing - that would work. There might be portals back to your ...



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