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20

AD&D took an interesting approach to this—the classes don't advance in levels at the same pace. It is still likely a level N wizard will be more powerful than a level N fighter, but if a fighter and a wizard have the same amount of XP, then the wizard will be of a lower level than the fighter. This is most evident when comparing the Wizard and the ...


18

A More Gradual Power Curve In 2e (and 1e and Basic), though it's still a thing (by design) that fighter types are more powerful early in the game and wizards more powerful late in the game, it's less of a dramatic gap between the two because the power curves are more gradual in general. Similarly, the difference between levels isn't as extreme (a level 7 ...


17

At very high levels spellcasters do become significantly more powerful than noncasters. However, compared to 3rd edition there are some important differences. For one thing, there is no Concentration skill and no 5 foot step. Also you have to announce your intention to cast a spell at the begining of the round. If anything hits you before it is your turn, ...


6

Great answers so far. Let me add another factor. AD&D tends to more more “challenge the player” instead of “challenge the character” than 3e and 4e. It also tends to be more rulings than rules than those editions. So, the question tends to be more whether the player is useful than whether the character are on par on paper. This is really a play style ...


4

The two big difference between D&D 3e and AD&D 2e for spellcasters was saving throws, and volume. In 3e, your saving throw goes up with level (fast for some saves, slow for others). The wizards DC also goes up (with spell level, and their stat). In practice, the DC goes up at a speed matching, or exceeding, the good saving throw of the target, ...


1

The brief answer is that modern D&D is more geared towards roles within set-piece encounters, thus the relationship of class should be considered by role... this was clear in 4e. Thus the power curves are more closely linearly-related than in previous editions, when the class generally had a single role (Hybrid classes blurred this.) A slightly ...



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