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19

Stats for purchased dogs The dog available for purchase from a kennel, as listed in the equipment chapter, has the statistics of a war dog in the Monster Manual or Monstrous Manual under Dog, and is a little bit beefier than a wild dog. The difference between the three is in what they are trained to be able to do, not in their statistics. Dogs don't gain ...


16

Planescape: Torment is based on Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Second Edition from the 1990s. THAC0, for example, only exists in that edition and a couple contemporary D&D editions (very late AD&D 1e and Basic supplements) - it's not a term found in other games. Armor Class doesn't work the same across D&D editions, let alone other tabletop ...


14

I played many years of 2e and have read the 5e PHB, Basic set, and Hoard of the Dragon Queen, so I think I can give some good points of comparison. (I'm excluding the Skills & Powers stuff in late 2e from this discussion, that was less like 2e than many other versions of D&D...) There are definitely similarities between 2e and 5e — mostly conceptual ...


14

1. Do Characters in 2e regenerate hit points for extremely high constitutions: Yes. According to the AD&D Player's Handbook on Page 15, starting at a constitution of 20, you regenerate health every 1/6 turns. Increasing to 1/5 at 21, 1/4 at 22, and so on until every turn at 25. 2. Is this present in 4e / 5e: No Regenerating hit points every round is ...


13

You're asking the wrong question, "maximum level" is irrelevant. It assumes a max level 2e character is calibrated with a max level Pathfinder character, which they're not, and that there is a maximum level, which there's not - see 2e DMG Chapter 3, "Above 20th Level," there is no cap in 2e. Your real question is "What level Pathfinder PCs are appropriately ...


13

Lots of classes in older D&D were not balanced to each other, and not balanced at every level of play. One of the main advantages that 2E monks had with the wacky unarmed combat tables was decent odds of getting knockouts or stuns - they had better chance of bumping up and down the results on the table, giving you some advantage there or of ...


12

If you never played 3rd edition (or its d20-system children, like Pathfinder), then 5th edition may be night and day distinct from the AD&D you were used to. The major changes can be grouped into "character creation" or "gameplay". Character Creation Like 2nd edition, 5e has the same six ability scores, core races, and rough class selection as most ...


12

Undefined and up to the DM. This is a feature, not a bug! In AD&D, both editions, magic items are the exclusive domain of the DM and they are given full rein in deciding how they work, which is to say: If you're the DM, the game doesn't care, so make up whatever sounds good. If you're a player, you have to ask your DM, or (more likely) experiment with ...


8

For tools to implement non-standard PC races, you want the AD&D 2nd edition The Complete Book of Humanoids (1993). An excerpt of the back blurb: This handbook describes in detail over 20 humanoid races that can be run as player characters — from mischievous pixies to stubborn minotaurs, from lizardlike saurial to the savage half-ogre — and many more ...


7

in AD&D 2nd Edition, what is the maximum level characters can be. In AD&D, 3rd edition, and PF, the normal maximum level was 20. (Though all editions had optional rules to continue after that point.) That in no way means that the recommended level in AD&D will translate to PF, though! :) The rate of power increase of both players and ...


7

You use the best progression from your two classes. Player's Handbook, "Multi-CLass Benefits and Restrictions", page 44, last paragraph before the multi-classing example: If the optional proficiency system is used, the character […] gains new proficiency slots at the fastest of the given rates. which is reiterated on page 52, end of the first ...


7

On page 67 they are listed at #9 on the infernal hierarchy in the ranks of the greater devils. This is part of the general section on the Infernal Hierarchy. Along with this text also on page 67. Greater Devils. The greater devils include the pit fiends, erinyes, horned devils, and ice devils that command lesser devils and attend the archdevils. So ...


7

First off, Erik mentioned pulling in the god's domains, personality, and history. This is vital. I would suggest having a couple of victory conditions: kill the god trap the god heal the god None of these should be easy, but all of them should be do-able. Of the three, trapping the god should probably be the easiest (it doesn't solve the problem, just ...


6

You are correct Lots - mainly trying to somewhat reconcile both power utility and rate of gain across classes Though 3e classes do diverge in power (see What are "tiers", and what tier is each class?), the goal was for them not to - this flows into the "unlimited multiclassing" 3e provided as well, where you could take a level of any class and ...


6

I have been called for, it appears. Canonically, of course, every origin or background of Asmodeus is a lie of some kind. While it's definitely accurate that he fell into Hell from elsewhere, and reasonably likely that his most well-known appearance is not the true nature of him, no one account best encapsulates the reality of what the Lord Below is. That ...


6

Asmodeus is actively spreading lies about himself Everything we think we know about Asmodeus, we think we know because Asmodeus wants us to think them. All of the stories about his origins, deeds, difficulties, and triumphs, are heavily, actively, and constantly monitored, filtered, and altered by Asmodeus and his agents. Nothing known about him in AD&D ...


5

Nope. Guidelines for how wealthy or magic-powered PCs were didn't really become important until 3e introduced a system that cared about balance enough to need official guidelines. In 2e, everyone just winged it and it worked fine. Your provisional rule is pretty much how it was always done: pick some numbers, play! The actual numbers picked are pretty much ...


5

Is there some game balance concern at work here I'm not seeing? Intention of the rules Mages cannot wear armor, have only few hitpoints and are very restricted concerning weapons. This is for game balance reasons to offset their enormous magical potential. This balance considerations are explained by the fact that mages have no training at all with ...


4

Unfortunately, I don't think you'll be able to get your hands on a digital copy, legally at least. I've looked around some and every core rulebook of that edition that I've found have been physical reprints.


4

Update: I am mis-remembering slightly. This answer definitely applies to AD&D 1E DMG (I have now just seen a copy), but the same tables may not be available in the 2E DMG. If that is true I suspect groups I played in used it to help build higher level parties in 2E, effectively using the 1E DMG as a sourcebook for some of the extra tables. 1E and 2E ...


4

The density of electrum depends on the exact proportions of gold and silver, but ranges from around 12.5 g/cm³ to about 16.5 g/cm³ †. Assuming the book is effectively a solid cube of electrum 24 × 36 × 4 inches, its volume would be 3,456 cubic inches. This is equal to 56,634 cm³. Given the density range above, this means it could weigh anything from ...


4

THAC0 and AC are terms very specific to some version of D&D. AC means Armour Class and lower means less probabilities to hit. THAC0 means To Hit AC 0, that is the number needed to be rolled in a d20 by the attacker to hit a defender with AC 0. If the defender had bigger or smaller AC the number needed to hit would be adjusted accordingly. Answering ...


4

The Item Is Deliberately Unclear I'm using the description of the quartermaster's chest (XP 2,500; GP 12,500) from page 288 of the Encyclopedia Magica, Vol. 1 (1999) and that description jibes with the description provided here. If this information is different from that found in Dragon #178 (which I doubt), I'd go with Magica as it's the only reprint (I ...


4

I'm pretty sure that this is Code of the Rats from Shadis Issue #21. It's by Dave Dollar and ran around 30 pages according to the Shadis Index. (Search for 'rats'.) It's also referred to as "From Spuds to Studs" in RPG.net's article index. (Billed on the cover as "The Only Introductory Fantasy Adventure You'll Ever Need.") It was: Published in 1995. In ...


3

There is no reason why a wizard should not be able to use a crossbow besides the rules don't include a crossbow in their weapon choice. Game balance wise crossbows are very much on the underpowered and underused weapons in 2nd ed, except for drow with their repeating hand crossbows. AD&D 2nd ed had very few weapons unless you had the Arms and Equipment ...


3

Keep the dog as color. It doesn't advance on its own. It doesn't use xp. It doesn't take levels. It should eventually be outmatched; it's a dog. If the ranger eventually gets the capability for companion animals, start using those rules.


3

The majority of D&D adventures pack in a fair bit of combat, but some can be converted to a less combat oriented scenario. The key is to find adventures that have significant non-combat meat to them, such as investigation. You can then strip out all the "filler" encounters, those that are either gratuitous or which don't have anything to do with the ...


3

While Gygax spoke against this, he also allowed it in his own games and in fact, in 1e, there are some hidden guidelines to support it. Deities and Demigods gives us rules for calculating hit points for non-humans with levels, and the Dungeon Masters Guide notes for the reincarnation spell offers a little bit of advice. I don't know to what degree these ...


3

Monsters suffer no penalties for using all the attacks their entry grants them. You're correct that the two-weapon fighting penalties are limited to humanoids that have to learn how to fight with two weapons. This is part of the general trend in TSR's D&Ds, from the original game up through AD&D 2nd edition, for monsters and PCs to operate by ...


2

In 2nd edition, it sort of depended on the setting, but generally, there was no max level. In Forgotten Realms, the max was set at 40th lvl, however. Generally, people only played up to 20th (and many people stopped before 20 and restarted a new campaign. Lots of people had a certain favorite range of levels and played through those a lot.) I kept the ...



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