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1

In 1e, I allow sharing of hp between a character and anything "in their charge" - lost princesses, familiars, dogs, horses etc. So long as the charge is within CHA (scaled) inches of the PC, they can choose to take some or all of the damage done to the other figure on themselves; representing the "luck" aspect of most characters' hps.


18

Stats for purchased dogs The dog available for purchase from a kennel, as listed in the equipment chapter, has the statistics of a war dog in the Monster Manual or Monstrous Manual under Dog, and is a little bit beefier than a wild dog. The difference between the three is in what they are trained to be able to do, not in their statistics. Dogs don't gain ...


3

Keep the dog as color. It doesn't advance on its own. It doesn't use xp. It doesn't take levels. It should eventually be outmatched; it's a dog. If the ranger eventually gets the capability for companion animals, start using those rules.


4

I'm pretty sure that this is Code of the Rats from Shadis Issue #21. It's by Dave Dollar and ran around 30 pages according to the Shadis Index. (Search for 'rats'.) It's also referred to as "From Spuds to Studs" in RPG.net's article index. (Billed on the cover as "The Only Introductory Fantasy Adventure You'll Ever Need.") It was: Published in 1995. In ...


5

If you never played 3rd edition (or its d20-system children, like Pathfinder), then 5th edition may be night and day distinct from the AD&D you were used to. The major changes can be grouped into "character creation" or "gameplay". Character Creation Like 2nd edition, 5e has the same six ability scores, core races, and rough class selection as most ...


12

I played many years of 2e and have read the 5e PHB, Basic set, and Hoard of the Dragon Queen, so I think I can give some good points of comparison. (I'm excluding the Skills & Powers stuff in late 2e from this discussion, that was less like 2e than many other versions of D&D...) There are definitely similarities between 2e and 5e — mostly conceptual ...


1

The majority of D&D adventures pack in a fair bit of combat, but some can be converted to a less combat oriented scenario. The key is to find adventures that have significant non-combat meat to them, such as investigation. You can then strip out all the "filler" encounters, those that are either gratuitous or which don't have anything to do with the ...


2

My own Scourge of the Demon Wolf. It has combat but the meat of the adventure is trying to deal with the factions of the village and unraveling the mystery. Most of my playtest were done with four hour convention slots there was never more than six players. The smallest amount I ran with was two players. I use bog standard d&d tropes including a ...



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