Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

48

E. Gary Gygax notes in several places that the class limits and level limits were both game balance and to force the game to be humanocentric. I'll let EGG speak for himself (Dragon #29, Sept. 1979, p. 12): The character races in the AD&D system were selected with care. They give variety of approach, but any player selecting a non-human (part- or ...


35

This question is very much about personal preference; therefore there isn't going to be a "right answer" or "solution." Here are my reasons for still playing: AD&D 1e is the last edition where a player's skill during the game mattered more than their skill during the character creation process (if we ignore some of the changes introduced by Unearthed ...


34

Points of Light The 4E Dungeon Master's Guide defines the parameters of a typical D&D campaign in the setting section. The default setting is called Points of Light, which describes how the world is mostly wilderness, full of monsters and ancient ruins, and peppered with occasional safe havens (typically villages and small cities). Exception Based ...


28

Rules over color - Lots of mechanics, especially characters powers, should be interpreted as rules first, color second. If you have a power called "foot sweep" that creates the status "prone," that's what it does. It doesn't matter if the target is a gelatinous cube, it still works. If you start ruling that things don't work because it doesn't make sense, ...


26

This totally depends on how the trap is designed! As the DM, you are the authority to which you should appeal. If you think of it before the thief starts messing with the trap (and therefore not yet indicating to you how they're approaching it and possibly biasing your choice), then you can just decide what kind of trigger this trap has. However, if you ...


20

It depends on why you're playing AD&D and what kind of game you're running. Do you and your group enjoy the challenge of tackling mundane problems in-game, like how to best navigate the Swamps of Miredom, whether to risk the mountain pass before the spring thaw, or where to find a buyer for a two-tonne gorgon carcass? If playing people trying to get by ...


20

The traditional way of handling PC death in AD&D is for the player to roll up a new, 1st-level character. The bite of death is strong in AD&D, and the intention is that players treat the risks of adventuring very seriously. However, what is traditional isn't universal—plenty of groups made up their own table rules for how to make a character after ...


19

The progression went like this Chainmail was a set of rules for wargaming with miniatures. People wanted to fight the battles they read about in Lord of the Rings, Conan, and other fantasy novels of the time. So the Fantasy Supplement was added. Dave Arneson was inspired by David Wesley Braunstein game to create his own version. He used the Man to Man and ...


19

Adjusting to the situation is important. Many good ideas have been mentioned already; here's some suggestions on when to use them: Fall! or Trip! Golden in precarious terrain or situations. I once had particular success with "Fall" against a charging guard captain... as he was mounted on a warhorse at the time. Leading the charge. Also, instant death ...


19

There are three reasons I can immediately think of that apply to new players - they're the reasons that my group started with an earlier edition of D&D, rather than later ones. Early D&D has much simpler and faster combat, with most attacks just being a roll of 1d20, a table lookup, and a damage roll if successful. Spells require a save or attack ...


18

Quite simply put: treat it as a wholly new game. It shares the same base range of stats. It shares the use of 1d20 to hit. Otherwise, it's almost entirely different mechanically. That leads to a wholly different gestalt in play. The game has strong niche protections, stronger than 1E, and in different niches from 1E (tho there is overlap). The biggest ...


17

This isn't rare at all. This is the Monster Manual from the 1st edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. It's worth about $5–$25 (US) on eBay, depending on condition. I got mine there for about $12, a few years ago, and prices haven't changed. Yours looks to be in fairly beaten condition, so you're unlikely to get anything much for it. Although it's not ...


16

Maps are fun. Make maps when you want to. You don't have to map anything, ever. But you'll want to, because maps are fun. Maps are just another tool that you have as DM to convey information to the players. When you want to convey something that is best done spatially, a map is useful. Personally, I find I often sketch very rough maps all the time during ...


16

Casting a spell takes a magic-user's entire round. They may not take any other actions, including moving. The number of segments listed for a spell is only used to figure out when during a round the spell completes, which can be important for figuring out whether the spell is interrupted (and spoiled). For a complete breakdown of the spellcasting process ...


15

According to "Ecology of the Troglodyte" in Dragon #235, it's not that they stink per se, but that they use scent to communicate. ...the overpowering stench that can reduce a human opponent to weak-kneed vomiting during combat with troglodyte, is merely the build up of olfactory battle cries, combat orders, screams of rage, pain, and hunger, and other ...


15

Actually, and technically, Yes. The second printing DOES contain those two mythos. It is every subsequent printing that does not contain them. For the first 1980 printing, TSR obtained permission from Michael Moorcock for inclusion of Melnibonéan material (from his Elric series of books). The Cthulhu Mythos was believed to be in the public domain, so ...


14

They are defined on p97 of the Dungeon Master's Guide Concealed doors are doors hidden in some way: Behind a curtain Covered with plaster Trap door under a rug A PC can normally find a concealed door just by checking his surroundings well. Secret doors are portals that look like a normal wall to the naked eye. Typically it takes more effort to ...


13

I hear you, but don't forget, this is in their lair. All creatures should be nastier on their home ground, where there are more of them, better organised, prepared, watchful and knowledgable about the territory, than when a couple are encountered in the wild. I want my players to be wary of going into lairs. I want them to go "the scroll says that the rod ...


13

New classes, new rules and such are not, in my opinion,the answer to this conundrum, and rarely are they the best answer to anything. Simple role-playing and DM adjudication based on common sense, however, are. Let's say your would-be con man is intent on deceiving the local constabulary into believing that, yes, indeed, this is his very own ...


13

I would call it at a 100 gems per pound unless you specifically state is a certain size (like the eyes of the Player Handbook Idol). Gems are weighed in carats and the problem is that the value per carat varies between gem types. Harnmaster is the only Fantasy RPG I know of that gives that information. Even armed with such information I feel it strays over ...


13

I don't think it really gets any better than "Autodefenestrate!" A cruel DM will make the NPC perform a language check to know what the hell you're trying to tell it to do, unfortunately. But you can argue that in the event of a failed check, the NPC should be forced to perform its best guess as to your meaning; hilarity may be expected to ensue. Does ...


13

There are major differences, but nothing too insurmountable. AD&D 1E adds non-weapon proficiencies in DSG, WSG, and OA, while they are core in AD&D 2E 2E allows points to be spread amongst thief skills, rather than using a fixed table per skill. 2E groups classes differently, and lacks the assassin and monk. Minor differences in several tables ...


13

Go wander outside your house or apartment or whatever and look for a wooded area. Write down a description of it. You've created an environment, then when you read that to your players, they are in it. Does it have corridors or rooms? No. It might have paths, and clearings that might make good places to have something happen, but the outdoors largely ...


13

The primary reasoning for this is because of Gygax's study of anthropology. Priests during the dark ages often favored staves and other blunt objects that could be used more for policing and self defense against other weapons than actual harm. Thus if used properly they would not cause bleeding (directly) but maybe severe bruising or a broken bone. EDIT ...


13

In AD&D 1st edition inches of movement represents three things. 6" = 60 feet per turn exploring a dungeon. This allows for the normal checks for surprise, mapping, detection of secret door, etc. 6" = 60 yards per round moving through passageways. Basically if the person or party is in a interior location that they know they move at this rate. 6" = 60 ...


13

Major Differences the list of classes the presumption of Non-Weapon Proficiencies Advancement of Thief Skills nature of Bards Kits Specialist Mages Clerics THAC0 Psionics The list of Classes AD&D 1E Core: Assassin, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Illusionist, Paladin, Ranger, Thief, Wizard. Bard is special, see below. AD&D 1E+ UA: Assassin, Barbarian, ...


13

You don't have to spend much time at all in order to make travel matter. Two major ways: Yes, use the random monsters. They represent a pressure that means the PCs must always consider the danger of the places they travel through, and prepare for it (or not, and occasionally suffer for it). They can also be springboards for new, unplanned adventures, which ...


12

Choosing a ridiculously over powered race is important. There is no level adjustment in 1E Svirfneblin, Drow and Derro all gain innate spell casting powers, numerous bonuses and magic resistance! Dragonlance Minotaurs gain enourmous Str and Con. The first edition Bard is also tasty... but I can't beleive no one mentioned Psionics. Stupid and arbitary ...


12

I've run a megadungeon for one-off sessions. Obviously making a megadungeon for just one session like that is a bit of a waste of time, but it can work really well if the players know that you've used or are planning to use the dungeon for other groups. I've had players get really into changing things and leaving little messages for other groups, once they ...


12

There are a few ways to deal with this: Give the players sufficient warning before stumbling upon the main Trogs encampment. Perhaps a patrol, or guard post, will give the players indications a larger lair is ahead. If they happily skip in then, let the dice fall where they may. Remember, earlier editions of D&D are not as forgiving as later ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible