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14

Write places apart from their location You can make your dungeons apart from their locale. Perhaps you've written up an encounter in the catacombs of the sun god, but the party keeps walking around in the harbor district instead of the city center? Move it to the temple of the sea god! Thieves' Guild up to no good? Party has found another of their hiding ...


13

You're somewhat confused, which is understandable since intellectual property rights and D&D is a confusing issue. OGL The OGL is a specific license. Only D&D 3e/3.5e was made open under the OGL. Other games derived from it (like Pathfinder) and totally unrelated games, like FATE, use the OGL. 5e does not use the OGL (their plans are yet to be ...


12

Gygax could be very cagey about questions like this and would give answers such as this one. But my impression of reading his comments, and sometimes communicating with him directly was that he didn't really stick to any one method and let players choose how to generate characters from the options listed in DMG and others he deemed "not cheating". Both he ...


11

Fate can readily emulate any sort of setting. Fate's rules and mechanics are setting neutral, you could run a very AD&D style campaign in Fate for your son without the rules detail and allowing you to focus on the story. As the designers themselves say in the core rulebook Fate doesn’t come with a default setting, but it works best with any ...


10

We don't know; the spell text was not converted properly from OD&D and no errata was ever published. One suggestion is to add the word "additional" to get "The spell caster is able to affect 1 additional level or hit die of creatures for each of his or her levels of experience." so a 5th level caster can affect d6 creatures +5 levels. Edit: I've not ...


9

It's important when tackling this to notice that D&D Next saves' math are tied to the effect, while AD&D saves math—despite the names being that of effects—are actually tied to class and level. That means that there's no way to crunch the AD&D math to find a conversion formula—the numbers are representing different things. As ...


9

Gygax wrote up a sample in the 1st Ed DMG - Pages 96-100. There is also some lead-in and outline discussion that sets the scene for the sample play. It narrates, multi-voice in the first person, an initial exploration and beginning combat in a low level dungeon. You only get the voice of the DM and the party leader. Apparently Gygax's method involved ...


9

The adventure says it is a 30' long remorhaz, and the MM entry clearly details how the remorhaz' HD and length are related (HD*3), therefore it is a 10 HD remorhaz.


8

For question 1 what to do for places you have not yet written, there are two great options. Quantum Ogre: This means that you have some places defined but not exactly where they are. When the players adventure into an unknown place, you give them this predefined but unplaced encounter/plot hook etc. Random Tables. Prepare some random tables for your ...


8

For tools to implement non-standard PC races, you want the AD&D 2nd edition The Complete Book of Humanoids (1993). An excerpt of the back blurb: This handbook describes in detail over 20 humanoid races that can be run as player characters — from mischievous pixies to stubborn minotaurs, from lizardlike saurial to the savage half-ogre — and many more ...


7

Regardless of whether it's because of a tie on the initiative roll, magic, or something else, this is covered in the DMG on page 66, "Simultaneous Initiative". (It even mentions haste explicitly as falling under this rule.) Basically, If they're both using weapons, then whoever has the weapon with the fastest speed factor goes first within the segment. ...


7

Those books were licensed reprints done by a now-defunct third party company, Twenty-First Century Games, sometime in the late 1990s or early 2000s after TSR had been bought by Wizards of the Coast but before WotC began publishing their 3rd edition of D&D. They were created specifically for the collector's market, and it appears that their value has gone ...


7

So besides your history with AD&D, is there any reason your actual kids want to play that instead one of the thousand other games in various genres out there? And while with an AD&D background you may find some of the FATE mechanics new and odd, for someone just starting in the game, do you have any reason to think they'd have more trouble picking ...


5

You've not been able to find such a rule because there is no restriction. Having multiple attacks allows you to use them against multiple targets.


4

The density of electrum depends on the exact proportions of gold and silver, but ranges from around 12.5 g/cm³ to about 16.5 g/cm³ †. Assuming the book is effectively a solid cube of electrum 24 × 36 × 4 inches, its volume would be 3,456 cubic inches. This is equal to 56,634 cm³. Given the density range above, this means it could weigh anything from ...


4

Don't Forget FAE While Fate Core is an excellent game, it may demand more from a what are essentially a new player and GM than they are willing to or capable of giving - at least at the outset. Fate Accelerated Edition is a stripped-to-the-bones version of Fate Core - the mechanics are the same, the concepts are the same, the terminology is the same. But ...


4

Could it be "The Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh"? In this AD&D module, you are investigating a haunted mansion. Within, there is a winecellar that contains several bins and a corpse. (See page 16, section "WineCellar".) The corpse is infected with 7 rot grubs (which burrow into your flesh and then to your heart, killing you). Once dealt with, the corpse ...


4

Just prior to your citation (DMG 28): "It is assumed that an appropriate type of head armoring will be added to the suit of armor in order to allow uniform protection of the wearer." Uniform Protection = Same AC as the armor worn; No helmet means head is AC10 (which is targeted 50% of the time -- 1-3 on a d6 -- when fighting an intelligent foe). There is no ...


4

No. Unless the DM has ruled otherwise, the spell write only copies spells. Write (Evocation) Level: 1 Components: V, S, M Range: 0 Casting Time: 1 round Duration: 1 hour/level Saving Throw: Special Area of Effect: One magical spell inscription Explanation/Description: By means of this spell a magic-user might be able to inscribe a ...


3

Coming out of ToEE they should be 7 or 8. Coming out of SotSL they should be probably 10 or 11. That should keep it pretty balanced, from my memory of those modules. Some amount of balance might need to be done as you play- if it's too tough give them some XP or item bumps above recommended, if it's too easy crank the AC's and saves of opponents up a ...


3

I think you're thinking of "One roll, to go" from Dragon #113. From the article: Included are three tables that will greatly expedite the die-rolling process. They emulate, respectively, 5 rolls, 10 rolls, and 20 rolls of a 20-sided die. The numbers across the top indicate the to-hit number (1 is left off since there is always a 100 percent chance of ...


3

A lot depends on the physics of how you're already running things. If players have a map then there's no great need to describe the route - just decide if it's a short, medium or long trip and roll a chance (say, 1 in 20 in day, 1 in 10 for night) for an encounter once, twice, or three times. Modify the die (ie, use a d8 or d6) depending on the areas they ...


3

What you want is enough information to be able to improvise in a city. Cities are actually easier to improvise with... if only because you can draw upon a general knowledge of human society to make up things as you go along. You know what a wealthy part of town probably has, compared to the docks, compared to the working class neighborhood. You can write ...


3

I started RPGing again after a few decades break. It's nice to finally be able to afford all the rulebooks you want. I bought up the D&D 4th Edition rulebooks and DMed a fortnightly game for a year or so. I found it too grindy and rules-heavy, it didn't capture the story-telling that I remember fondly from playing D&D in the 80s. I've recently ...


3

I used to do this all the time. 1st edition and 2nd edition were so similar that I used any module any where, including what are now called BECMI modules. The stat block might be in different orders but it was all the same stuff. I knew the rules well enough and I ran it. To me it was all backwards compatible until 3rd edition came out. 2nd edition and ...


3

The majority of D&D adventures pack in a fair bit of combat, but some can be converted to a less combat oriented scenario. The key is to find adventures that have significant non-combat meat to them, such as investigation. You can then strip out all the "filler" encounters, those that are either gratuitous or which don't have anything to do with the ...


3

While Gygax spoke against this, he also allowed it in his own games and in fact, in 1e, there are some hidden guidelines to support it. Deities and Demigods gives us rules for calculating hit points for non-humans with levels, and the Dungeon Masters Guide notes for the reincarnation spell offers a little bit of advice. I don't know to what degree these ...


3

If it's the spell, then you must save each time the spell is cast on you, just like any other spell. Likewise, wands and spell-like powers. There's a grey area with some monsters, such as dragons, which cause fear simply by flying overhead or charging. Personally, in that and similar cases I would allow a single save to count for the whole of an encounter or ...


2

My own Scourge of the Demon Wolf. It has combat but the meat of the adventure is trying to deal with the factions of the village and unraveling the mystery. Most of my playtest were done with four hour convention slots there was never more than six players. The smallest amount I ran with was two players. I use bog standard d&d tropes including a ...


2

A purely urban campaign was one of the most memorable 1st edition AD&D campaigns I ever played in and would share these tips from that experience: What you haven't planned for: as a dense concentration of humanity (or demihumans), a city is an impossible canvas to plan for entirely. But that is its greatest strength as well. All things are possible at ...



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