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30

Maintaining the AD&D Feel If you want to maintain the AD&D feel of this module you have to keep the following in mind: it's a death-trap. I have played it, I have DMed it and I have spoken to many people who fondly remember the way their characters died in it; I have never spoken to anyone who finished it although I and a few others have escaped ...


22

Hit dice for monsters in both editions of AD&D are almost always d8s, so it's normal for monster stats to say things like “6 HD”, “3 HD + 4”, or “½ HD” with no further explanation given. From the Monster Manual introduction where how to read statistics is explained: HIT DICE indicates the parameters of the number of hit points a creature can ...


16

You're somewhat confused, which is understandable since intellectual property rights and D&D is a confusing issue. OGL The OGL is a specific license. Only D&D 3e/3.5e was made open under the OGL. Other games derived from it (like Pathfinder) and totally unrelated games, like FATE, use the OGL. 5e does not use the OGL (their plans are yet to be ...


13

Gygax could be very cagey about questions like this and would give answers such as this one. But my impression of reading his comments, and sometimes communicating with him directly was that he didn't really stick to any one method and let players choose how to generate characters from the options listed in DMG and others he deemed "not cheating". Both he ...


11

For both scenarios, it helped me to think about what would happen if the druid cast the Wall in the open, and then walked towards a stone wall. The first image/scenario has no precedent for occurring. The Wall can be a sheet or a ring, not an amorphous blob, at least without some other influence. If the tunnel walls somehow repelled magic without negating ...


10

We don't know; the spell text was not converted properly from OD&D and no errata was ever published. One suggestion is to add the word "additional" to get "The spell caster is able to affect 1 additional level or hit die of creatures for each of his or her levels of experience." so a 5th level caster can affect d6 creatures +5 levels. Edit: I've not ...


9

The adventure says it is a 30' long remorhaz, and the MM entry clearly details how the remorhaz' HD and length are related (HD*3), therefore it is a 10 HD remorhaz.


9

The wall of fire should be a ring around the party. It shouldn't go into "secret" rooms that you are unaware of, only places that you know about. I would GM it the second way. You really do not want to get into distorting spell effect areas with natural terrain as that will be a constant problem and exploit.


8

For tools to implement non-standard PC races, you want the AD&D 2nd edition The Complete Book of Humanoids (1993). An excerpt of the back blurb: This handbook describes in detail over 20 humanoid races that can be run as player characters — from mischievous pixies to stubborn minotaurs, from lizardlike saurial to the savage half-ogre — and many more ...


7

Regardless of whether it's because of a tie on the initiative roll, magic, or something else, this is covered in the DMG on page 66, "Simultaneous Initiative". (It even mentions haste explicitly as falling under this rule.) Basically, If they're both using weapons, then whoever has the weapon with the fastest speed factor goes first within the segment. ...


7

Those books were licensed reprints done by a now-defunct third party company, Twenty-First Century Games, sometime in the late 1990s or early 2000s after TSR had been bought by Wizards of the Coast but before WotC began publishing their 3rd edition of D&D. They were created specifically for the collector's market, and it appears that their value has gone ...


7

There's a document on Goblin Punch (You can find it here) that explains the hit die for monsters on the site is a d8: Monsters have 1 HD for every level they possess. This is a d8 hit die, so a level 3 monster has 3d8 HP.


7

For the most part, it’s the former: AD&D groups often had six, eight, or more people playing. When those adventures were written, tabletop gaming, and AD&D in particular, were extremely popular. You could find RPG clubs just about anywhere, and when the clubs met it was not uncommon to have ten gamers to a table. And remember, when they say 6 to 8 ...


6

AD&D 2nd edition, which is largely compatible with AD&D 1st edition, has an optional way to customise races in Player's Option: Skills & Powers. The system breaks down the traditional list of abilities a race grants and assigns them values in Character Points. A character gets a certain number of CP to purchase racial abilities, choosing from ...


6

There's no need to house rule this — you just need to start enforcing its restrictions. Allow me to draw your attention to its area of effect: 4 square″ + 1″ square/level (Aside, this is taken from PHB page 95, since the Illusionist version of the spell has different range and area of effect.) These are table inches, which we could convert to ...


5

You've not been able to find such a rule because there is no restriction. Having multiple attacks allows you to use them against multiple targets.


5

To convert a module you'll need the AD&D Module and 5e books. Especially the bestiary. A big part of converting a module from a prior edition to a future edition has to do with the monsters that populate the dungeon, so you'll need your AD&D bestiary, and any monster tables for 5th edition so you can create the encounter tables necessary to run the ...


4

Just prior to your citation (DMG 28): "It is assumed that an appropriate type of head armoring will be added to the suit of armor in order to allow uniform protection of the wearer." Uniform Protection = Same AC as the armor worn; No helmet means head is AC10 (which is targeted 50% of the time -- 1-3 on a d6 -- when fighting an intelligent foe). There is no ...


4

Could it be "The Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh"? In this AD&D module, you are investigating a haunted mansion. Within, there is a winecellar that contains several bins and a corpse. (See page 16, section "WineCellar".) The corpse is infected with 7 rot grubs (which burrow into your flesh and then to your heart, killing you). Once dealt with, the corpse ...


4

Designing the Gnobbit, the Gnalfling, or the Halfome. (Note: Neither Svirfbits nor Halfieblein are addressed. That is left as an exercise for the reader). In asking for "balanced" hybrids, this fits within the general level of "balanced" for 1e that exists. Demi-Human breeds with Demi-Human The two 1e races are both in the small size, and are very ...


4

No. Unless the DM has ruled otherwise, the spell write only copies spells. Write (Evocation) Level: 1 Components: V, S, M Range: 0 Casting Time: 1 round Duration: 1 hour/level Saving Throw: Special Area of Effect: One magical spell inscription Explanation/Description: By means of this spell a magic-user might be able to inscribe a ...


4

Chris Perkins adapted Tomb of Horrors for D&D Next in Dungeon magazine, issue 213. D&D Next was sort of the "beta version" of fifth edition, but it should be very usable.


3

As Nagora mentioned in his answer, this is a grey area that will require DM interpretation. Here are a few possible approaches to this problem: A single save vs. fear that lasts the entire encounter A save vs. fear whenever the creature does specific actions A save vs. fear each round as long as the encounter lasts A save vs. fear once every set number of ...


3

If it's the spell, then you must save each time the spell is cast on you, just like any other spell. Likewise, wands and spell-like powers. There's a grey area with some monsters, such as dragons, which cause fear simply by flying overhead or charging. Personally, in that and similar cases I would allow a single save to count for the whole of an encounter or ...


3

No, there are no maximums of the kind you're looking for. The problem isn't that there should be limits per-class to prevent ridiculous scores — the “problem” (which is not actually a problem) is that you've chose the most high-rolling way to roll for scores. The method we used was rolling five times per stat with 3d6 and keeping the best one for each ...


3

The majority of D&D adventures pack in a fair bit of combat, but some can be converted to a less combat oriented scenario. The key is to find adventures that have significant non-combat meat to them, such as investigation. You can then strip out all the "filler" encounters, those that are either gratuitous or which don't have anything to do with the ...


3

I used to do this all the time. 1st edition and 2nd edition were so similar that I used any module any where, including what are now called BECMI modules. The stat block might be in different orders but it was all the same stuff. I knew the rules well enough and I ran it. To me it was all backwards compatible until 3rd edition came out. 2nd edition and ...


3

Coming out of ToEE they should be 7 or 8. Coming out of SotSL they should be probably 10 or 11. That should keep it pretty balanced, from my memory of those modules. Some amount of balance might need to be done as you play- if it's too tough give them some XP or item bumps above recommended, if it's too easy crank the AC's and saves of opponents up a ...


3

I think you're thinking of "One roll, to go" from Dragon #113. From the article: Included are three tables that will greatly expedite the die-rolling process. They emulate, respectively, 5 rolls, 10 rolls, and 20 rolls of a 20-sided die. The numbers across the top indicate the to-hit number (1 is left off since there is always a 100 percent chance of ...


3

While Gygax spoke against this, he also allowed it in his own games and in fact, in 1e, there are some hidden guidelines to support it. Deities and Demigods gives us rules for calculating hit points for non-humans with levels, and the Dungeon Masters Guide notes for the reincarnation spell offers a little bit of advice. I don't know to what degree these ...



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