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11

This isn't rare at all. This is the Monster Manual from the 1st edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. It's worth about $5–$25 (US) on eBay, depending on condition. I got mine there for about $12, a few years ago, and prices haven't changed. Yours looks to be in fairly beaten condition, so you're unlikely to get anything much for it. Although it's not ...


2

Back in the day, I used initiative to determine what order things happened, and that included movement. (I did individual initiative each round, since I wanted a little more tactical feel.) I did a simple d10 roll, modified for Dex (Reaction/Attacking Adjustment, with the sign flipped) and for weapon speed (Speed Factor from PHB p. 38, divided by 3, ...


0

I've used a middle ground among these answers: I ballpark time when it's not critical, and when it is (in combat, or exploring a dungeon) I track time meticulously. Ballparking time is easy enough and doesn't require any paraphernalia. It feels somewhat awkward at first, but soon you get more skilled with estimates, communicating them clearly, and generally ...


1

The Wild North setting in Fight On #3 was written by myself and it is my attempt at combining Russian mythology with D&D tropes. You can get it from Lulu either printed or in PDF. Warning Lulu has expensive overseas shipping so the only practical option may be the PDF. While statted for Original D&D it works with any classic edition. It is based on ...


2

First level Clerics and Druids can pick any spells from their respective list. Probably done to balance the fact their selection have few offensive spells and the class involves following a religion. On Page 39 there is a chart that you can use to determine the initial spells of a starting Magic user. The page explains there procedure the end result being ...


6

The AD&D Dungeon Master's Guide (1979) contains information on acquiring spells on pages 38-40. It's... complicated, but, in short, clerics and druids get any low-level spells they want, and initial magic-user and illusionist spells are acquired randomly. Clerics & Druids Clerics and druids cast any spells they want of up to 2nd-level spells, but ...


3

Use time Wilderness is anything but static. As hours pass, the sun continues its course. Some creatures go to sleep, others awaken. The sounds change. The air chills or heats, wind picks up. Nightfall makes travel different (Will they stop to camp ? Continue with torches or lanterns and risk attracting beasts ?). Also consider fatigue. "Realistically", not ...


2

There is also some question of how the journey itself proceeds. Are the characters traveling to this dungeon for the first time? Are they journeying overland or is there a road to the destination? If there isn't an established route to the dungeon, then make the party actually navigate through the wilderness. Maybe they get lost. Maybe instead of walking up ...


3

There are really two questions buried in this one. 1. Should I try to mask the mechanics for immersion purposes? I've found that actively trying to hide mechanics like AC and initiative can actually be more distracting from than supportive to the immersion. Although I'm sure it depends on the mood of the table, in my experience keeping the rolls and ...


6

As Dakeyras said, there's no official, concise, complete Eastern European setting for D&D. However, with a little effort , you can create your own, based on fragmented D&D resources and material for other rpgs, both of which will require conversion... but as a GM/DM that shouldn't be too much of a challenge. I'd suggest taking a thorough look at ...


3

Sadly, I think the answer's no. There's a list of campaign settings on Wikipedia that seems to be quite complete, especially for earlier D&D editions. There's also a list of D&D settings, which isn't missing anything I can see. Neither of them have anything like what you're looking for, so odds are that you can't even use another system's setting as ...


4

This may seem counterintuitive, but one thing I did that was both simple and efficient was to avoid getting too detailed about it when detail didn't really matter. If the scenario doesn't demand meticulous tracking of time, a ballpark figure will often work quite well and will save time and effort that you can put into more interesting parts of the game. ...


3

First off, you and your players have to be prepared to deal with a fair bit of description of a given encounter space (or you have to be willing to do a lot of "winging it" and allowing the players to invent details as you go). For some spaces, you can rely a lot on real-world experience (for example, if the encounter takes place in a bar, there are a lot ...


5

The simplest answer is to hide those things that cannot reasonably be known by the character, or figured out routinely by the player, and give such details as are necessary. AC is a tricky one. Some details can be figured out easily (the guard is wearing chain mail, so his AC is probably around X), but sometimes you'll want to lob a few surprises at people ...


2

I'd recommend this adventure from Dragonsfoot.org, which has the benefit of being free. It is designed for 4-6 players of 1st level who are of 'novice or intermediate' skill, so it's pretty much perfect for the group composition. The contents of the adventure are rather straightforward. A Meazle has secretly made its home in a small village and is stealing ...


1

Four hours is a pretty short requirement, and since this is going to be a learning session it's probably going to go more slowly and even further limit what you can accomplish. The one that comes to mind that might be most suitable is N1 (Against the Cult of the Reptile God), which was an interesting (if sometimes stereotypical) adventure designed for ...


3

Whiteboard Sketches. In my 10-year-plus AD&D campaign we rarely use tiles and never use minis at all. But we did find that simple maps are very useful. Not detailed records of the adventure, or complex cartographies of everything in the world, but just really simple drawings of the location a combat scene was taking place in, for instance. Throw-away ...


13

You don't have to spend much time at all in order to make travel matter. Two major ways: Yes, use the random monsters. They represent a pressure that means the PCs must always consider the danger of the places they travel through, and prepare for it (or not, and occasionally suffer for it). They can also be springboards for new, unplanned adventures, which ...


4

Travel time can be hard to make interesting. I'd say that you have two basic options: fill it with interim encounters or simply narrate the travel. Encounters on the road: the party could run a bunch into monsters like you mentioned. This is of course a valid option and a decent opportunity if you need filler combat, but remember that encounters don't ...


8

This depends on your group. Eventually they'll figure out stuff like armour class by seeing which rolls are enough to let them land a hit and which miss, and telling them beforehand lets them see whether they hit without you needing to look up any tables, so in my games I usually let the players know what armour class an enemy is, at least once they've ...


11

Try to ignore segments. They're a concept that was mostly introduced to keep track of how long it takes to cast a spell (more on that below), and aren't helpful for the rest of combat. Instead, concentrate in the actual initiative results. Treat the action of a round as mostly simultaneous, but with the winners of the initiative getting the advantage. So ...


6

Counters are a really useful tool. You give each player a (for example) red counter per ration they have, or other limited resource they need to spend every set amount of time. The DM gets 23 black counters that are each 1 hour, 5 blue counters that are each 10 mins, 9 green counters that are 1 minute each, and so on. Then when time passes you move a counter ...


4

Action Movie Scale A useful thing to consider is what kind of game you want to run. What are the expectations for the action in the game? Is it brutal, slog through the mud, slip on your knees and beat someone to death with a shield? Or is it swashbuckling with running along bannisters and swinging on chandeliers? Figure out what's a reasonable ...


3

Historically a popular method of dealing "skill checks" has been an attribute roll. Methods include The use of an attribute as a percentage. For example an intelligence of 15 means a 15% chance of success Multiplying the attribute by a factor (typically 5). For example example an intelligence of 15 means a 75% chance of success Rolling a d20 equal to or ...


5

I touched on this in your broader question, in that basically much of it comes down to two options: If the action isn't something critical to the storyline or something entertainingly done (e.g. your example of trying to avoid fall damage) you would simply decide for yourself what the chances are of accomplishing the task, and roll (or have the player ...


4

Advantages are more of a subjective matter. What you consider pros/cons I may consider cons/pros. Having said that, these are the main differences from what I remember: AD&D has less 'customization'. This is an advantage for the DM as there is less chance of a 'munchkin' character overshadowing other players. But some players will prefer this as they ...


6

The AD&D manuals are awful to learn from in an efficient manner. They are wonderful for long, meandering explorations of the game (probably sitting in an overstuffed leather chair in front of a crackling fire, with a snifter of brandy or somesuch signifiers of studious leisure), but when you're just trying to get up to speed for the first time on how the ...


9

I've stuck with an older version of the system for one simple reason: investment. Rules, campaigns and adventures for older editions of D&D can be obtained at ridiculously low prices either second hand on in e-format direct from the publishers. For a tiny outlay, you can accumulate a vast treasure trove of material for your games. A lot of this ...


2

I know you asked for videos, but for combat I consider the ADDICT reference from the Dragonsfoot site to be excellent. It is extensively footnoted with page numbers.. Additional first edition resources can be found at the Knight and Knaves website and Dragonsfoot. Particularly their forums. I did a search and found this video on Youtube. If you look at the ...


7

Groups Used to Have More Players It wasn't unheard of in RPG gaming's early days to play in much larger groups than are expected when playing contemporary RPGs. A group of 6 was reasonable, and I played AD&D in high school with groups as large as 12, with players rotating in and out week by week. Thus it's not uncommon for older adventures to be built ...


8

By far the simplest solution is to start the players at a higher level. If you dont' want to do that then get either B1 In search of the unknown, B2 Cave of Chaos, N1 Against the Cult of the Reptile God, or T1 Village of Hommlet. Get them leveled up through those adventures and then proceed to the A series. I personally used Hommlet and made the evil cleric ...


5

The reasons I would give are vary similar to Craddokes answer. I will comment that most gamers don't play AD&D by the book. In my experience the most common variation is the AD&D character options, items, spells, and creature combined with OD&D/BECMI style combat leavened with a handful of rules from the DMG. This is due what I considered the ...


33

This question is very much about personal preference; therefore there isn't going to be a "right answer" or "solution." Here are my reasons for still playing: AD&D 1e is the last edition where a player's skill during the game mattered more than their skill during the character creation process (if we ignore some of the changes introduced by Unearthed ...


19

There are three reasons I can immediately think of that apply to new players - they're the reasons that my group started with an earlier edition of D&D, rather than later ones. Early D&D has much simpler and faster combat, with most attacks just being a roll of 1d20, a table lookup, and a damage roll if successful. Spells require a save or attack ...


2

As mcv intimated, remember that in AD&D the experience cost to rise basically doubles every level for name levels. This means that by the time the fifth level characters rise to sixth level, the first level characters will have risen to fourth or fifth level (there might be some loss due to delays in getting to new levels after acquiring the necessary ...


2

From the standpoint of how to make it work story-wise, you might also consider borrowing a concept from another RPG (HackMaster): proteges. Simply put, a protege is someone that the current character has "in training" in the event of their retirement (voluntary or otherwise) from adventuring. It would not be unreasonable for the characters to be aware of ...



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