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22

The fluff is there to help you as the DM build a coherent fictional world. First, without any explanation even to the GM, "there's a bearded devil with an intelligent glaive in a cell" seems to not make a lot of sense. "But why didn't they disarm him?" "These guys are devils, why is a devil in a cell?" etc. PCs tend to investigate things and want to know ...


9

Tease them. Make sure they want to hear the rest of the story, they want to see the plot progressing and the combat is but a mean to that end. More specifically, there is one thing I have always found important and my DM's have virtually never used: player backstories. We all have our players write backgrounds for their characters, but how often do we use ...


8

All that information is to help you take a generic monster/location and make it something your players will remember. It helps you to give the people/creatures that they are interacting with personality and depth so that if the person was to reappear later on, just from the way they spoke or acted the players would go "hey, isn't that the guy we met last ...


8

The Adventure Paths are all standalone; each takes a new set of characters from level 1 to somewhere in the teens. Some NPCs or relatives of NPCs show up in later APs (like Sandpoint from Rise of the Runelords reappears in Jade Regent, and various Vancaskerkin relatives appear in many of the APs), but that's more of a cool Easter egg than a necessary plot ...


6

My group bounces around a lot as well. Part of the problem is that I want to play very heroic campaigns. I want to be the good guy (or maybe the flawed hero), and I want to kill the evil guy (even if he is a misunderstood genius who made a few bad choices). Other players love that morally gray area talk-heavy style of play where the players spend as much ...


5

An adventure path is a series of linked modules designed to take an adventuring party from the beginning of their careers to reasonably high level. So far, they've primarily been written for Dungeons & Dragons, although there's nothing inherently D&Dish about the concept. Generally, they have strong thematic and plot links. As one might guess, they ...


4

The biggest change is that it got converted to Pathfinder! It was D&D 3.5 in its initial incarnation. Also, since it got combined from 6 softcovers into one hardcover, they had to cut space. Most of the articles that were in the original AP chapters were removed, especially the fiction and gods articles, it focuses just on the in-play stuff. They ...


4

No scale is presented in The Armageddon Echo itself (print or PDF), but on the forums someone projected up from the Library of Dust size and figured the whole thing's a 2000 ft across town, and James Jacobs replied to confirm it was indeed small (though he didn't cite a scale). See Is it just me, or is Celwynvian really small? on the Paizo forums.


3

According to Strategemini's review on the Anniversary Edition page, emphasis and formatting mine: What has been removed? Articles. There are no more Pathfinder Journals. Many of the articles that were in the adventure path were also removed. All articles on Gods (Desna and Lamashtu) have been removed. The history of Karzoug was removed. The culture of ...


3

Well, I didn't get an answer here so I tried in other locations. On the Paizo forums I was told that though there is a lot of overland travel in Jade Regent's first three chapters, most of what happens when you might be on your mount would be random encounters and roleplay encounters, and that most bosses and major things are in caves/dungeons where mounted ...


3

Yes Shamelessly stealing from wikipedia produces: Path 1 Shadows of the Last War (July 2004, ISBN 0-7869-3276-7). This adventure is designed as a sequel to The Forgotten Forge from the core campaign setting, but can be run on its own. Eratta Whispers of the Vampire's Blade (September 2004, ISBN 0-7869-3510-3) This adventure is designed as follow on ...


2

My take on it is this: adventure paths that focus a lot on encounters that make more sense with small numbers of opponents (for example, the Skinsaw Murders, part two of the Rise of the Runelords) or confined encounter spaces are harder to convert: the aesthetic in 4e is to have larger numbers in the opposition with a wider movement space. Also, Paizo has a ...


1

I'm unsure about the specifics of the campaign, but generally if you play a small sized character you can ride a medium-sized mount (like a wolf), which will still fit in most dungeons. Despite weapon downsizing, dpr will still be obscene if you take spirited charge & ride-by-attack. The Gendarme archetype will help you get all the prerequisite feats ...


1

While the other answers are good, always remeber that these books are made so that the adventure looks awesome to you, the Dungeon Master and probably the one who's gonna buy the books. A lot of things in these books will never happen or be useful, but if they manage to make you go all oooooooh over them, they've done their work.



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