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3

We have a saying in the software industry. (One that seems to be less and less heeded as the years go by, but I digress). It's called "YAGNI": "You ain't gonna need it." What this means is that by sheer scope of the setting, you have to start with the bits that are the most relevant to your PCs and work outward. This is especially true with a setting ...


8

I'm currently struggling with this because I'm getting into Glorantha, which is one of the Big Three settings (Tékumel and Hârn are the other two). The Big Three dwarf even settings typically considered huge, like the Forgotten Realms, and it's daunting to try to figure out how to eat this aircraft carrier, let alone how to prepare some of its most choice ...


5

When I use heavily developed RPG settings like Shadowrun and the Forgotten Realms, I deal with setting fidelity in a couple of ways. Use an underdeveloped part of the setting Even the richest, novel-laden settings have thin spots. Some regions just aren’t detailed as well as others. Some parts of the metaplot lie fallow for ages. Often, all you need to do ...


2

You have expressed two conflicting goals. In a comment: you want to be as authentic as possible in the question: read through it (quickly, because gaming night is upon you) You would not expect to be able to write a historical novel set in the court of King Edward IV of England that is "as authentic as possible" with a quick skim of a history ...


15

without which material your game won't feel authentic, just a bad copy, an alternate universe of an alternate universe. I started writing an answer about how to narrow down and use a small, immediate bit of setting to get a small, immediate situation, and I came back and read this part again. That's your problem. You have a strong commitment to ...


7

When I am overloaded with too much setting material, I head online instead. Normally in the various play by post forums, or other forums and wiki articles online, I'll be able to find a summary of the important information. Here is what I look for when skimming: Adventure introductions in PbP game advertisements such as those on Myth-Weavers. These ...


13

Short answer is start from the bottom and advance upward. That is instead of jumping into a massive open sandbox campaign from the start you set the game in a very small and narrow sub setting. Now I don't know Shadowrun but if I'm allowed to use Forgotten Realms as an example that too is a huge and massive world with lots of information. However, if you ...


5

I'd borrow heavily from Night's Black Agents here. What you're running is a thriller, where the PCs are, in a way, in the position of Jason Bourne. Very capable on their own, but outclassed by an enemy that keeps coming out of nowhere, and if they show up with great numbers, it's all over. First piece of advice: have a scene where some capable bystanders ...


1

This is a very difficult kind of adventure to pull off. Players don't like running in the first place, and unless they are confronted with a truly inexorable force they are not likely to do so. And once one PC is downed, or if even one refuses to flee, the rest are extremely unlikely to flee themselves. I've seen this a lot in my games - they say "Run ...


2

I'm working on a similar adventure for my group. What I've found that works well is to create encounters that play to the creatures' roleplaying aspects. For displacer beasts, hit and run tactics, close encounters and seeing the aftermath are often scarier than a straight up fight. Playing up the aftermath of an attack on a settlement can often both raise ...



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