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My favorite non-mapped solution of a dungeon may be of interest. The players find out when they enter that the place is enchanted by some god or demon and they are actually now on a different plane of reality where some spells may have a different effect. (Teleportation will for example always lead to the same room [it's a panic room, a safe space — ...


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A left-field approach, inspired by the hard-funnest puzzle I've ever tackled: run them through a fractal maze1. Fractal Mazes A fractal maze contains entire copies of itself as subsets of itself, as one might suspect. I'm not suggesting you actually design one in-game and by DM fiat manage the inevitable conflicts in spatial scale; you can use one to be ...


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Consider a grid such as this one: Numbers represent a fight/trap/obstacle the party will have to overcome while navigating the maze. Numbers with a letter represent a harder version of the encounter (harder/more enemies, higher skill DCs for traps/obstacles, etc.); the farther the letter is into the alphabet, the harder the encounter gets (so B is harder ...


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I recommend using a deck of playing cards and having events assigned to card types, suits, evens or odds. It depends on how complex you want the maze. Here's an example of a D&D 5e maze I just ran my party through. As they moved through this maze, the path behind them would be obscured by a magical fog that was impenetrable. If they attempted to enter ...


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First turn the Maze into a list of results from the maze that players might want. you can do this ahead of time or just ask players what an ideal(but still reasonable) trip through the maze might look like. An example list follows: We find the exit We remember the way back quickly We find some treasure We avoid fighting monsters We don't fall into any ...


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A maze is mathematically a graph; the nodes are where interesting things can happen and the edges are paths between the nodes. Something interesting means: A decision between edges (paths) A monster A trap A trick A treasure A combination of the above. Nodes can be small or large. A 4 way intersection of 5 foot corridors is a small node, a 500 x 500 ...


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Take your dice. And roll them. Make a simple chart like you would see for making enchanted gear as a player. set your 100 die parameters: 0-10: simple traps 0-20: oblivious monsters(eating talking not paying attn) And so on and so on Set your simple 0-10 parameters: 1 pit fall 2 dart from wall And so on and so on As for the pc's adventuring set a ...


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You can abstract a labyrinth into a list of possible approaches, and their stages, requirements, and results. In this way, you can choose what you want the results of different approaches to be like. As just one possible example of this, perhaps you want the labyrinth to be a test of spiritual fortitude, and you anticipate the following approaches: If a ...


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I don’t think you need a map for an interesting maze any more than you need a map of a city for engaging urban adventures or a map of a forest for a successful survival scenario. If you already have a good source of tension (“run for your life”, “race to the treasure”, “no stone left unturned”, “find exit or die”), you can narrate the maze the same way you ...


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As a D&D 4e DM, I was seriously thrown out of my (at the time) habitual game preparation techniques because of the emphasis that 4e put on challenging and balanced encounters instead of "there are two goblins on this room" that would probably be solved by the initiative check. So, quickly I found out that preparing a full maze and let people explore as I ...



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