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2

You could try talking to them. Certainly, there are magical options that allow you to forcibly change the alignment of a creature, but the good old fashioned method of explaining to a villain the error of their ways is always an option. Admittedly, it's a high-maintenance option that is unlikely to succeed without spending a vast amount of time and effort ...


1

There are no RAW ways to change a creature's alignment in 5E as it has become a more "rules-light" element since older editions. There are however plenty of [Good] spells in 3.5's Book of Exalted Deeds which are related to salvation of evil creatures. One of them that comes into mind is: Sanctify the Wicked, level 9; traps target's soul in expensive gem, ...


2

You could make it a roleplay thing. I mean, since you're a warlock AND a paladin I'd assume you have high cha (lay on hands and invocation saving throws) I imagine a few diplomacy throws and a show of mercy could do what you want. granted the DM allows.


3

It can be done, but probably not by you. Since you have Create Thrall, you must have at least 14 levels of Warlock, but you'd need 17 levels of Paladin (or 9 levels of Bard, Cleric, Druid, or Wizard) to redeem an evildoer (for 30 days, anyway). 17 levels of Bard, Cleric, Druid, or Wizard to make it permanent. The spell Geas can be used to command an ...


0

Why desecrate? The 2nd-level Clr spell desecrate [evoc] (PH 218) does one of two things: When casting the 3rd-level Clr spell animate dead [necro] (PH 198-9) et al., the spell desecrate makes animated dead better; or the spell desecrate makes an already created undead horde better. The spell desecrate cuts the connection between an altar, shrine, or other ...


2

1) If the Cleric is a PC his alignment is his choice and can change suddenly at any time. As long as God is okay with it, he can suddenly turn evil, cast the spell, then turn good again according to the RAW in the atonement spell description. 2) If that's not allowed he can use the Atonement spell, but since he's deliberately casting an evil spell, he will ...


1

just found this... sorry for the troll, but page 83 of the PHB states "As guardians against the forces of wickedness, paladins are rarely of any evil alignment." Sounds to me as if any choice is playable, as long as you work the back story right.


3

Underlying Social Situation Some of us had decided it might be cool if my character could convince the rest of the party to join a cult, which might involve persuading them to change their alignment from good to neutral. Specific to your situation - there's the problem. If I jump into a D&D game with the understanding that it's going to be ...


7

Let's forget cults, alignment, and player agency for a minute, and focus on your core theory question: Is a static character bad roleplaying? It depends: It's a question of Genre and Art There is a wide variety of reasons people play roleplaying games. Unsurprisingly, there is an even wider variety of roleplaying games. Just like in novels, movies, and TV ...


3

Violating the social contract, however implicit and unspoken it might be, can be considered bad etiquette. Of course, the amorphous nature of the agreements at our table means this is sometimes subjective. The problem here might be too strongly coupling "Unwilling to change alignment" with "Unwilling to change". Whether or not the player's behavior is rude ...


13

The situation you describe is pretty complex. I'll pull it apart and look at the different aspects, but the short version is: There should be a way for both of you to get what you want. Player Agency To begin with, a player is entitled to control of their own character. Permanent changes to the character, particularly to the character's personality and ...


0

You say this person is roleplaying as Goku. Well, lets take a look at Goku. Goku is a guy who helps people everywhere he goes. He stops villains because it is the right thing to do. He's sacrificed his own life on more than one occasion to save his friends and others. He's a guy who is so merciful that when he is staring down Frieza, a guy who has murdered ...


2

I think this is a problem in two parts, which somewhat complicates the answer. I'll try to answer both and I hope it gives you an idea of what I think is happening here. Playing a character that does not fit a campaign is bad form This is why you think the Goku player is roleplaying poorly. In a campaign where all the players will join a Neutral cult, ...


1

The fun thing about D&D is that you get to play what you want. I think your friend wanting to play a strictly LG character is perfectly fine, but I think overall you guys could be going about this poorly. The reason I say this is because it seems like you've found something you want to do in character, but then attempted to settle it out of character. ...


3

It is widely considered rude I suggest that this player (and really, all players) read the Giant's “Making the Tough Decisions,” particularly the past about deciding to react differently. I consider it mandatory reading for people I play with, because it excellently addresses exactly this issue. Your player is failing to react differently, and it’s a ...



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