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0

Yes. If your character were struggling with his conscience, I'd argue for a single alignment. With an actual split personality, meaning that the orc side takes over every so often (triggers and rules are important, here*), your character could absolutely have multiple alignments. Something to look into is how the mind works when different personalities take ...


-4

The shadow dragon would probably be conflicted between it's Gold and Shadow natures, as the MM most likely assumes a shadow dragon is chromatic, but the transformation might mess up the psyche, creating a dual nature.


0

The short answer is Yes. From what little I know about your character, your interests in following a CE god are likely... a pursuit of power? Power for the sake of power trends toward Evil, but if you're willing to dip your hands in filth in order to pursue a goal that is less-than-evil, that's when you get into the murkier aspects of alignment. Some ways ...


1

This is a similar situation to an issue that I had with a black dragon wyrmling. There is a way to force an alignment change and it would take a simple Geas spell, although I am unsure about the moral justification for it. Forcing someone to be someone they are not is just as evil as anything they are doing. Anyway Nitsua60 explained this method or rather ...


13

There are three ways to forcibly change something's alignment on the books. But none of them really work out well for you.... Forced attunement. Arguably the least dangerous option, if you can somehow force the dragon to attune a magical item you might change its alignment. Perhaps a Geas? If your DM sees that working, and you have any of The Book of Vile ...


-5

No, you really can't change essential nature. Alignment indicates tendencies, not absolutes. You can train the wyvern to do good, but it's nature will always steer it to thinking selfishly for itself. Any training and listening will not be loyalty based, but based on fear of consequences and tangible rewards for loyalty.


1

I don't think this is so much an alignment question as it is perhaps for how to use personality traits. Alignment in 5e seems to be more of an aspiration rather than a confining factor. I.e. "My paladin is lawful good and so does his best to uphold justice and represent the common good" And use the personality traits to describe how your character is ...


-2

Eh, I don't see why not. It's an interesting character idea, and there are no rules specifically using alignments, so you can totally do it within the rules. Also, that's a really cool idea, and I need to try that!


3

Because there is no direct rule based correspondence with alignment, it wouldn't make any impact on the game mechanically. Because it is solely a role-play feature, there wouldn't be any reason as to why it shouldn't be allowed. As long as you, your DM and other players are comfortable, I'd say it's a green light.


11

From my understanding of the alignment in 5e, it is more representing your general behavior than the other way around. So if you are more of a good human, then your alignment will be good. If you are more of an evil orc, then your alignment will be evil. If you are about 50/50, then you are neutral. I would not foresee your alignment as swinging back and ...


14

Sure, but alignment barely exists in 5e There's no rules in 5e on how to simulate a character with a debilitating mental disorder like this. Assigning a different alignment to each personality is sensible, and you could possibly even make a disease condition based on the Helm of Opposite Alignment (sadly gone in 5e) to control the switch. What would this ...


1

As from the RAW you don't "lose" a feat. It is "just" unusable if its prerequisites are no longer fulfilled, until they are fulfilled again. If as a GM you find this too harmful -- for example for alignment changes -- you COULD rule that he loses the feat and can choose a different one instead, but as far as RAW is concerned he has the feat and just can't ...



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