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11

Come up with that yourself, or consult your group for assistance in working out what it should mean. You and your party are (in-game or at the table) coming across something new and exciting in the world: an individual who transcends alignment. It's in your power to determine where you go from here. There's no precedent for this in Pathfinder that I'm aware ...


1

Personally as a DM I love the occasional unexpected response from the players and welcome the potential fallout from these actions. There should certainly be consequences and as mentioned in other answers; these situations offer great hooks for future development in the game world. In addition to feeling the impact of the guards' deaths, there are other ...


2

It seems that your question has 2 (related) sub questions: Are the characters behaving to their alignment? See How do you adjudicate what alignment a PC's actions are? for answers to this. What consequences should follow from their actions? See My PCs have a plan that will get them all killed; how and why should I save them? for answers to that.


3

There should always be consequences. If there aren't then your world will feel lifeless. Next time the PCs are captured, they are gagged and hobbled. One of the guards says, "We had an escape a few months ago, killed several guards. Since then we've updated our security."


3

The consequences of such actions, whether projected onto the characters themselves or just the world around them, should have effect. They arranged for the death of 8 people. If you want to instill a sense of what happens when you kill an 'NPC', you could present a guard's wife in the street begging for money because she has nothing left. Perhaps she is ...


0

This is trivial - they did something which logically has in-game consequences, so the DM plays those out, same as any other action. I think what you're really asking is "I don't want to bother with the results of this, is it okay to ignore it and get on with what I want to do?" The answer to that is, yes. It is a sort of reverse railroad, but if you have a ...


-2

I have read all the posts. and I gotta tell you. Letting them live is a mistake. They need to learn that walking down the street and throwing a fireball in to the bar (i know they did not do "that") Has undesired results. a re-roll of characters causes these got captured, tried and beheaded.. tends to remind players.. oh we are the good guys.


23

I can think of several ways to handle this, not all of which (due to timing) are really relevant for your situation. 1) Pre-game discussion, set-up, expectations I notice that even though you say the PCs were imprisoned by the civilian authorities, you don't say why and we (and possibly the players) know nothing about the world you've set up. Did the PCs ...


11

Some of this depends on how you prefer to define 'good' in your game world. In books and movies, it is very common to treat anyone working for the bad guys as bad, and therefore deserving of any horrific fate that the good guys find expedient. Nobody worries about storm troopers having families, despite the overall Star Wars story being all about ambiguity ...


3

some mix of the two with a blunted response and a minor story arc Sounds like the best choice to me, because they are still learning the ropes, and might have made different choices with more information. A story arc that brings the players up to speed with the alignment system and the moral nuances of the campaign you're running not just fairer, but ...


41

Han Solo, Robin Hood, and the three Musketeers: all would be stereotypical Chaotic Good characters. And none would have a second thought about dispatching their prison guards, whether it's Stormtroopers, the sheriff's men, or a guard in the Bastille. So the first question would be: did they really act out of character? What would you have expected them to ...


7

YES to all Blaspheming as a non-evil caster (or an alignment-changed good outsider) is a Bad Idea. Especially with the ubiquitous caster level buffs. It's a great way to YASD in Pathfinder. Note that (other than 'dead') you do get off slightly better than most creatures, assuming you cast as you last action on a turn; your conditions end on your ...


-4

Yes. I can only speculate that if a good aligned Cleric was somehow manipulated into being a vessel of evil that you would be affected by the spell. As for the caster level, you should be free to cast at a lower caster level so long as it meets the requirements for the spell. You can cast a spell at a lower caster level than normal, but the caster ...


10

As far as my knowledge goes, yes, a helm of opposite alignment can affect Demons. As far as Demons&Devils go, they're "just" outsiders born on evil-aligned planes who're generally always evil and have the Evil subtype (see below) forced upon them. There is nothing mechanically preventing a demon or devil from having nonevil alignments (though they'd ...



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