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-2

I think the best way to answer this question is to pull some examples from real life and literature. First, the scale from chaotic to lawful has nothing to do with the scale from good to evil. A chaotic person does not like rules. They may follow rules because they are inherently good (i.e. thou shall not steal) or because they don't want to go to jail ...


-2

While I sympathize with you in that disruptive behavior can be detrimental to the group dynamics, I just want to point out that the behavior you describe is not necessarily bad behavior. I'll step through each of the behaviors you mentioned in your question. Burning down a pub to stop the flow of polluted beer: I can genuinely imagine a character who would ...


16

This is "alignment," which is a label for a character's moral or ethical leanings in relation to metaphysical forces. What exactly the labels means has actually varied considerably over time. D&D originally had an alignment system inspired by Michael Moorcock's fiction: Law, Chaos, and Neutrality in between. Law generally represents a drive to order ...


26

The term 'chaotic' is part of the alignment system in D&D. Within the alignment system, your personality and decision making is rated on two scales. One from good to evil, and the other from lawful to chaotic.From the D&D Player's Handbook (5e): Lawful good (LG) creatures can be counted on to do the right thing as expected by society. Gold ...


29

D&D has a concept called “alignment,” which is a kind of shorthand for one’s ethical, moral, and philosophical outlook on life. It has two axes, the good-evil axis and the lawful-chaotic axis, and you can either be at those extremes, or at neutral in the middle. Your alignment is a combination of these two axes, so your choices end up looking like this: ...


33

The methodology I've settled on is as follows: The creature is the dominant inhabitant of the correct alignment plane (according to the Manual of the Planes). The Greyhawk (default setting for D&D 3.5) cosmology lists the Outer Planes that are keyed to the nine alignments. The creature has the appropriate alignment subtypes - an iconic Lawful Good ...


27

In AD&D, the cosmology of D&D which had gradually developed over the course of numerous publications was codified into the Planescape setting, which focused on adventures on the planes besides the Prime Material. The architecture of the cosmology focused on the “Great Wheel,” the sixteen planes surrounding the Outlands. These seventeen planes, ...


6

No, please don't do that. I like to make an analogy to football. Imagine that the score is tied, the clock is ticking down, and the quarterback has a clear path to the end zone. But he's not running! He turns and throws the ball to the enemy quarterback, who catches it and promptly scores a touchdown for the enemy team! A dramatic upset! The crowd goes ...


0

Having done this myself, it's definitely possible. If you do it, I would recommend Have your DM use the same-page tool. Specifically, what happens when someone sides with an enemy. I planned it with the GM from the start, but the other players simply weren't expecting it. So while we gave plenty of hints about my nature, they just didn't connect the ...


3

Background Evil is not necessarily cackling with laughter, hatching plans to destroy the world and stroking white Persian cats. Go on, actually read what it says on p. 122 of the Player's Handbook. As well, read How do you adjudicate what alignment a PC's actions are? All psychopaths are evil but not all evil characters are psychopaths. An evil person ...


0

Just ruleswise you normally can. Only one thing is to keep in mind there that there are spells and abilities which show ones alignment which means THERE no lie should be done (although it is for the gm to reveal to the casting player there anyway so that is not your job). Socialwise it could prove to be a problem in case you LIED to your friends. But that ...


0

Yes you can plan an evil character in secret, and it's fun for the DM. One of my player is a Tieffling assassin and the other players see him as 'a discret thief that disappear frequently'. If I have any advice for you, it would be : avoid metagame don't tell them your alignment protect yourself from detect evil enjoy conspiration with the DM


2

While the whole alignment discussion hasn't been resolved yet, and opinions run wide and far, there is one thing I feel we can all agree on: An alignment does not limit the range of emotions you can experience. A Good person can be sad, an Evil person can be happy, a Chaotic person can be bored and a Lawful person can be angry. Love is simply another ...


2

There are a lot of different Dhampir homebrews, but I haven't seen any that say a Dhampir must be a certain alignment. They are intelligent and free-willed; they can be any alignment- including Chaotic Good. Whether the character herself is chaotic good is hard to say- you've told us almost nothing about her. You're right that loving her brother doesn't ...



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