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0

No. But you can somewhat bend it to your own will. When an item has an Ego of its own, it has a will of its own. The item is absolutely true to its alignment. If the character who possesses the item is not true to that alignment's goals or the item's special purpose, personality conflict—item against character—results. Similarly, any item with ...


4

By the RAW, No There are no rules in the RAW which allow one to change an intelligent magic item's alignment. Once it is created, that is what it is and will not change. Your only option is that your GM will allow a house rule/overrule that will allow you to somehow do this in game (as Iankill suggested). If he doesn't go for that, I would say that in ...


5

Considering this item is unique to your campaign, and was given sentience by your GM. I'd say try to roleplay out a conclusion with the sorcerer that made it. For example capture the belt now that it has legs, take it to the sorcerer and see what he can do. The GM might let him make another craft roll to try and change the alignment of the belt, or if he ...


5

I'm going to read between the lines here and assume that the player's characters generally don't mesh with the party. Your problem isn't whether you, or the player can come up with a reasonable in-game justification for the character to mesh with the party - the problem is that the player, makes characters that don't fit with what kind of game you or the ...


3

Understanding Evil Some people have an infatuation with themselves being evil and in turn try to shift their own perceptions of their character into their dungeons and dragons character to express themselves. It's not something that should be ignored as an evil character in a group with good people would cause a problem, unless there is a reason for the ...


10

In order to know how to deal with this player, you first need to figure out why he always wants to play an evil character. Possibility 1: He may have lingering biases from previous editions of D&D. You tagged your question 4e, so I'm assuming that's what you're playing. Previous editions of D&D had much stricter alignment systems, and often playing ...


11

I, once, used to decide about reasons for things like this myself. There was one campaign that I ran, in which the groups of good and evil characters were together because they fought against a common enemy ("yes, he's bad, but I need him with me or this uber-evil will defeat us all"). Another reason that I thought about and used was with the good guys ...


1

Spoony covers things rather well in this video. But to add to that, there's always the option to have that character working for the BBEG, gathering information about the party and using that for plot hooks and so forth. There is also The Book of Vile Darkness, both DM and Player versions, which has a bunch of ways to help incorporate an evil character ...


0

Rule of thumb for the Good/Evil axis in AD&D-inspired games: Good: shares what they have Neutral: takes what they need Evil: takes what they want Extreme Good: sacrifices self to save others Extreme Evil: takes what they want; destroys what they don't Reducing Evil is a Good act; reducing Good is an Evil act. Are the baby goblins bound to grow up ...


-1

I believe that ones alignment should be based on what their motivations and reasons are, more so than the acts that they commit. Of course murdering a blind orphan is bad, but if it saves the rest of the town, and they have no other inclination to do it, then it shouldn't affect their alignment, though possibly over time if such an action were to be repeated ...



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