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1

For a character to be Good they must actually act Good and do Good deeds regularly, because they choose to be a Good person, and not simply to "top up" their align-o-meter. In D&D, alignments are Cosmic Absolutes, not simply moral judgements of the mortal races. Regardless of the how a given people act or think, there are Greater Powers out there in the ...


-2

Crazy & 2x Boring. (Sorry.) Like earlier explained, not all good outsiders are celestial, and not all evil outsiders are fiends. Their subtypes [good/evil & chaotic/lawful] reflect this. Usually a culture (or D&D-creature) is known for a type of -unique- behavior, you could name (organizations of) such creatures accordingly. Like "Dancing ...


1

The terms "celestial" and "fiend" do not represent specific personifications of the alignments. They are simply races/species/etc that do not live on the Prime Material Plane, and have a racial tendency towards that alignment. It's equivalent to Prime Material races/species having a tendency towards an alignment, such as how Orcs and Goblins are considered "...


12

The closest answer is "anarchic", "axiomatic", and no word for neutral. But the question is strictly incorrect: there is no 3.5 generic term for anthropomorphic personifications of good or evil. Celestial are a group of outsider races (angels, guardinals, some animals, etc) which are all good. They are not the only good races, nor are all good races ...


2

It is nowhere near as clear - and changed from 3.X to Pathfinder. The Pathfinder templates you're looking for are Resolute, Entropic, and Counterpoised. In 3.5 it was axiomatic and anarchic templates for law and chaos.


5

Making an evil foe's weapon gain the weapon special ability holy causes the foe to gain a negative level while the weapon's wielded While the Good domain's supernatural ability holy lance's duration continues and the foe continues to wield the weapon, the foe will have that negative level. But the GM must assess how the cleric touches a foe's weapon in ...


4

Lawful Evil isn't Lawful Dick One of the things to remember is that you're still in a party for the same reasons you were before. Being evil doesn't mean doing whatever you want. And as SPavel wrote, you can still have friends! In your case, being evil could mean voicing a different opinion or casting a different vote for what the party should do next. Your ...


9

Even Evil has friends The biggest issue with an Evil character is that a lot of players believe that Evil means selfish, and selfish means screwing with the PC's party members. But the party members are his friends, and source of strength. This makes them part of the in-group. The Evil character may jockey to become the party leader, but he need not go ...


1

I have had a few games where alignment was rather important, and I've always used the below logic to handle the situation: I made a note of each player's alignment in a notebook. Whenever, during conversation or by action, their character did something pretty contrary to their alignment (DM's discretion as to what that means, but I always took the ...


2

Designate Touchstone Events, Evaluate Intent, and Involve Your Players Touchstone Events These are events which are designed to call into question a specific Alignment Axis (Good/Evil or Law/Chaos). They should be placed in an adventure and should generally be unavoidable. They may or may not target multiple characters. These events should be predefined ...


6

Don't know if what we have is fancy or not. My group uses a simple grid system. Each player gets some standard graph paper, marked with zones boundaries at \$x\$ = −15/+15 and \$y\$ = −15/+15. In between those are Neutral zones. Going up the \$y\$ axis is good; down is evil. Right on the \$x\$ axis is lawful; left is chaotic. During play as we progress ...


6

Take inspiration from the WoD Humanity/Path system. The only alignment-tracking system that I've used that both allows for shifting alignments like you specify and also has a decent method of bookkeeping is the Humanity (and Path) system from the World of Darkness games. There's a decent rundown of the specifics here. While there are a number of specifics ...



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