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1

Underlying Social Situation Some of us had decided it might be cool if my character could convince the rest of the party to join a cult, which might involve persuading them to change their alignment from good to neutral. Specific to your situation - there's the problem. If I jump into a D&D game with the understanding that it's going to be ...


6

Let's forget cults, alignment, and player agency for a minute, and focus on your core theory question: Is a static character bad roleplaying? It depends: It's a question of Genre and Art There is a wide variety of reasons people play roleplaying games. Unsurprisingly, there is an even wider variety of roleplaying games. Just like in novels, movies, and TV ...


3

Violating the social contract, however implicit and unspoken it might be, can be considered bad etiquette. Of course, the amorphous nature of the agreements at our table means this is sometimes subjective. The problem here might be too strongly coupling "Unwilling to change alignment" with "Unwilling to change". Whether or not the player's behavior is rude ...


12

The situation you describe is pretty complex. I'll pull it apart and look at the different aspects, but the short version is: There should be a way for both of you to get what you want. Player Agency To begin with, a player is entitled to control of their own character. Permanent changes to the character, particularly to the character's personality and ...


0

You say this person is roleplaying as Goku. Well, lets take a look at Goku. Goku is a guy who helps people everywhere he goes. He stops villains because it is the right thing to do. He's sacrificed his own life on more than one occasion to save his friends and others. He's a guy who is so merciful that when he is staring down Frieza, a guy who has murdered ...


2

I think this is a problem in two parts, which somewhat complicates the answer. I'll try to answer both and I hope it gives you an idea of what I think is happening here. Playing a character that does not fit a campaign is bad form This is why you think the Goku player is roleplaying poorly. In a campaign where all the players will join a Neutral cult, ...


1

The fun thing about D&D is that you get to play what you want. I think your friend wanting to play a strictly LG character is perfectly fine, but I think overall you guys could be going about this poorly. The reason I say this is because it seems like you've found something you want to do in character, but then attempted to settle it out of character. ...


2

It is widely considered rude I suggest that this player (and really, all players) read the Giant's “Making the Tough Decisions,” particularly the past about deciding to react differently. I consider it mandatory reading for people I play with, because it excellently addresses exactly this issue. Your player is failing to react differently, and it’s a ...


3

The only mechanical reference to Alignment occurs with the Paladin(blackguard) class. As written Blackguards can only be Neutral or some version of Evil, never good. Alignment is briefly touched upon by how the deities are arranged, but no where in the books or the character builder does it restrict the available deities for a character to match their ...


2

There are a lot of cultures, religions and organizations that have rules and customs that seem overly fussy to outsiders. But when you dig into why they are present and the history behind them, you understand that they are not arbitrary but part of a greater scheme of things for that group. In short you learn the context in which odd customs, and beliefs ...


0

I would assume a wish would do it, unless your DM is particularly stingy or the item is supposed to be semi-artefact level in power. There's one way to find out...


1

There's not a stock item or spell that does this. In the Wrath of the Righteous Adventure Path, there is an evil "Corruption Forge" used to make evil items that the PCs can convert over via lots of hallow spells and crafting work into a Purity Forge and then use to make evil intelligent items good - we are reworking the evil weapon Soulshear into a holy ...


0

Only if you're cool with Randy, the Magic-Loving Demon Belt Helm of Opposite Alignment: When placed upon the head, this item's curse immediately takes effect (Will DC 15 negates). On a failed save, the alignment of the wearer is radically altered to an alignment as different as possible from the former alignment—good to evil, chaotic to lawful, neutral ...


1

"Should my good character kill this evil monster?" is one of the questions that ends up coming a lot. In general, this kind of thing is perfectly acceptable, if only because the game expects it from you. However, if you are more interested in the whole "how does alignment work" debate, I would suggest trying to see if one of your friends has a copy of the ...


2

It was an act of good by D&D standards D&D has a very black and white approach to morality. Killing an evil creature is an act of good because there is one less evil creature in the world. Had the bugbear surrendered and then been killed, it would then be a case of lawful vs chaotic as well (and is a good starting place to get the players to think ...


-2

Good actively tracks down and destroys Evil. Not doing so is a neutral act at best. Killing Evil is, in D&D terms, like killing smallpox. In other words: the PC did the right thing by their alignment.



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