New answers tagged

1

This is the (somewhat simplified) system I use for tracking players alignment changes. I have play-tested it a couple of times on D&D 5e with my friends and they all seem to approve. I will be bypassing the aspect of which choices lead to various results - as I believe that is up to the DM to decide. An example of this might be that killing for some is ...


6

So, you are looking for a mechanical way of judging the outcomes of moral agency? Good for you: you are joining a quest that humanity has been engaged in for at least 4,000 years covering fields as diverse as philosophy, religion, sociology, politics and law - there is no end point in sight. What is evil anyway? If you actually read the description of D&...


1

Pathfinder has an alignment tracking/change set of rules completely compatible with 5e. You can read the basics here on the SRD, it involves tracking actions over time across a 9x9 grid and but there's more color around them in the actual Ultimate Campaign book. There's also a system for deliberately changing alignment and what kind of penances etc. are ...


-1

I would suggest something along the lines of a sort of scale. With benchmarks at each point. For example you have your Good/Neutral/Evil scale out of 100. Good sits at 75, Neutral at 50 and Evil at 25. Whenever a character does something that you determine to be good, depending on the size of the deed, the scale goes up X. Viceversa for a evil deed. Repeat ...


2

The key to role-playing a character is in two parts which both come from the theatre: Acting & Writing ACTING: You have already mentioned the first part when you say "I don't find it interesting to invent some "artificial" character, with no real connection with me" which is a problem I sometimes call buy-in. If you cannot connect to your character, ...


1

TSR and by extension Wizards has always had issue with wording in spells and it always comes down to the DM's discretion. That said, given the text and literal meaning of "Similarly" if you took it in context that you could only detect one at a time you would similarly only get to detect a creature OR consecrated ground. Given the fact that it is blocked by ...


2

Personally, whenever I want to play a character that isn't just 'me, but a ranger' I'll think back to books I've read, pick an interesting, well fleshed out character from a book, and then mold them for the setting. This works best if the character has been well fleshed out, and even better if the book's been written in such a way to reveal their inner ...


9

The presence of singular pronouns might seem to indicate that you would only detect one however I would argue that you detect all in the area. This has been the case in previous editions and there is no guidance as to which evil/good you would detect if there are multiple (which one might expect if you only detect one, something along the lines of "if ...


0

RAW, it would appear that you can only detect one at a time (I could not find any relevant text to suggest which one, perhaps GM discretion). However, given how otherwise similar the description of Detect Magic is, I think it would be reasonable for a GM to rule that Detect Evil and Good would work the same way, i.e. "If you sense [Evil/Good] in this way, ...


2

I used to keep a small note file of my character's quirks, history, and personality traits on hand while role playing characters much different from myself, and then I would review it regularly as the game moved forward so that I could remind myself often - almost like a set of 'what would [my guy] do?' instructions. Like others said - there's nothing wrong ...


2

It's the same for me. Much like video games, I have issues with playing a game through in particular ways. I have issues playing as a woman (not being sexist - just as a guy, to me it feels weird); and a lot of the time I struggle sticking with an "evil" character. So in RP, I tend to create characters that fit my personality - Neutral good, always male, ...


1

When I first started playing I had no idea what to expect so I just did what I thought was right at the time. As that progressed I got to know my character and was able to play him more. I didn't get round the writing my back story until I'd levelled up the first time. I write stories myself so when I wrote my characters back story I strung together ideas ...


2

On the simplest level, filter your reactions and decisions through the viewpoint of your class, alignment or race (for a typical FRPG, flavor for other systems). An elf would react to a bar fight very differently than a half orc, or a fighter very differently than a warlock. Don't fall into the "My Guy wouldn't do that" trap, though. Use the viewpoint to ...


2

I think it's normal, at the begining I always made the same characters, usually wizards or if I was feeling lucky some ranger. After a while this gets old, and you get bored of playing always the same characters, so I started playing deeply flawed characters, even if it means my character would die after a few sesions (because my alignment was opposite to ...


4

What would Jesus do? Or rather what would a hybrid of Valmont and Arsène Lupin do? Clearly, their reaction to some stimuli should be very different from yours. This is a trick I use all the time as GM and player: pick two, or more characters from fiction (books either fictional or historical, movies, plays, TV series) and mash them together. Add a dose of ...


5

Don't try to be creative on demand Don't try to conceive of your next character holding dice in front of a blank character sheet. Consider it while (or after) reading a book or watching a show or movie, reading the news, or going about your life. The Mysterious Elf Generator Some RPG players play the same character with different names, over and over. ...


16

That's okay. I've played in a lot of games and I don't usually roleplay much either. The most important advice I have for beginning roleplayers is to roleplay someone who isn't annoying. Too many people decide to roleplay a thief, or a racist, or a bully. If the other characters don't like having you in the group, the players probably won't like having you ...


8

I can't make any claims as to what is normal or not, but I can say I have observed other players who tend to "role-play themselves" or to role-play very similar characters who are not themselves, so it seems not uncommon. I can also say that as the years have gone by, I have found myself creating and playing characters farther and farther away from my own ...


23

I think that feeling is perfectly normal and probably pretty common with new players. For some, it may be a comfort issue, where they aren't comfortable acting not like themselves and for others, it may be an interest issue, where they have no desire to roleplay. Now here is the thing, you don't have to roleplay every variation nor do you have to roleplay at ...



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