Hot answers tagged

40

It's d20 + attack bonus vs. AC, not just d20 vs. AC. For example, the basic ogre in the Monster Manual makes attacks at +8. So that ogre can hit AC 20 on a 12 or higher. Rolling a "natural 20" (i.e. the die itself comes up 20) is a hit regardless of AC, so opponents have at least a 5% chance of inflicting some damage on you. (Damage tends to scale with ...


26

Does Armor Stack? In general, there are two notations for AC: The most common variety sets your AC to a fixed value, and looks something like this: AC = 11 + Dex Modifier (Padded armor) Your AC equals 10 + your Dexterity modifier + your Wisdom modifier (Monk Unarmored Defense class feature) Alternately, some items increase your existing AC, ...


25

D&D 5e is premised on the idea of bounded accuracy. ... bounded accuracy means your attack bonus/defenses don't automatically increase with level ... bounded accuracy lets you take a monster (say, an orc) and pit him against pretty much any level of hero, knowing that the monster will still have a decent chance to hit and dodge. magic weapons ...


23

No. Both of these class features give you a different way to calculate your AC and according the page 14 of the PHB: Some spells and class features give you a different way to calculate your AC. If you have multiple features that give you different ways to calculate your AC, you choose which one to use.


20

Don't pretend you're a rogue, because Ardents don't look good in leather. You require some real (and exotic) metals between you and the enemy. The thicker, the better. Ask for some mirrored or hydra layered plate platemail +5, as it's in a similar theme to your original gambit armor. Item materials are also important and scale by half-tier1, but your main ...


19

If you're asking "I am aware of monsters with bonuses to attack rolls, but are these the only monsters..." then right here is the misunderstanding. ALL the enemies will have an attack roll bonus. For the very, very weakest enemies (say, a single rat) the bonus will be +0, but that's an exception rather than the rule, usually all enemies appropriate for a ...


19

This is one of the most annoying and awkward pieces of 3.x rules You don’t get enhancement bonuses to AC, you get enhancement bonuses to armor bonuses So, armors grant an armor bonus to AC. Seems simple enough. Then we have enhancement bonuses. You could, in theory, have an enhancement bonus to AC; if you did, it would stack with an armor bonus, since ...


18

Yes. An unarmed strike is a one handed, simple, melee weapon, as such it counts as a weapon for TWF. So for both of your cases, it would be valid. It's even valid for a non-monk as that strike is available to anyone who is proficient in Simple Weapons. The key is that it's not available to someone wielding a shield, an item or a non-weapon implement in ...


17

Yes, that's all there is to it. Modifiers are never applied to THAC0, so when figuring THAC0 based on 1st edition to-hit tables, all you have to do is look up the number you need to hit a target with AC 0. If you're using 2nd edition THAC0 numbers it's even easier: just write down the number for your class and level from table 53 (PHB p. 91) and you're ...


15

Yes. Bonuses in 5e are rare, and we don't know all of the details yet, but there is no reason to think that Mage Armor and Shield do not stack. The only thing we really know is that casting a new concentration spell breaks the previous one. Neither of these spells are concentration spells and thusly they would not conflict in that way. 5e does not use ...


15

First line of Mage Armour; You touch a willing creature who isn’t wearing armor Last line of Mage Armour; The spell ends if the target dons armour or if you dismiss the spell as an action. So, you can't even use Mage Armour on yourself if you're wearing or don armour, be it magic studded leather or not, let alone gains it's benefits in your ...


15

Yes, he keeps his monk AC bonus if he loses his Dexterity bonus to AC. From the monk's AC bonus class feature: He loses these bonuses when he is immobilized or helpless, when he wears any armor, when he carries a shield, or when he carries a medium or heavy load. These are the only conditions that cause a monk to lose their AC bonus. If he does not ...


14

Your "base AC" is your AC before any modifiers. However, it is not a defined game term at this time as it has little or no use outside of the Mage armor spell. Such modifiers may include: Class based bonuses like from a Fighting style Magic bonuses from items Temporary bonuses from spells. Other things not included in this list. So your "Base AC" is ...


14

I did some more research online and it seems some situations/conditions, where a target is denied its dex bonus to AC, are: Blinded Cowering Flat-Footed (target hasn't yet acted in combat) Attacker is Invisible Stunned Paralyzed Helpless Pinned via Grapple Acrobatics to Cross Narrow Surfaces/Uneven Ground Climbing Running Squeezing Social situations ...


14

If you are referring to the table, Armor Special Abilities, please note, the "+5 bonus" to the right of "Spell resistance(19)" is under the column heading, "Base Price Modifier". This is merely informing you that spell resistance(19) has the equivalent cost or value of a +5 enhancement. Thus if the armor was a +4 chain shirt with spell resistance(19), the ...


14

Yes Mage armor (as well as Luminous Armor and it's Greater sibling) aren't armor, they are spells. When they effect you, they are now magic effects. Specifically, they are a force field or an aura of light that gives you some bonuses. They might look like armor, but they aren't. Since they aren't armor, they won't affect the Monk's AC bonus class ability ...


13

For Attack: Dexterity vs. AC you roll 1d20 and add your bonuses (using your Dexterity modifier) and compare that to the monster's AC. If the sum is equal to or greater than the monster's AC, the monster is hit with the power. Your bonuses are 1/2 your level + the attribute modifier (in this case Dex) + other bonuses such as weapon proficiency(+2), a ...


12

The rules for shields say: Shields. A shield is made from wood or metal and is carried in one hand. Wielding a shield increases your Armor Class by 2. You can benefit from only one shield at a time. So as far as the rules are concerned, a shield only counts if you're carrying it in one hand. If it's on your back, it's effectively worthless. Your ...


12

You should forget everything number-related, and ask yourself this question: Are the encounters we're facing at this point too much for us to handle? If the answer is no, then everything's fine. Signs that the answer is "yes" include: one or more people have had to roll up a new character encounters aren't really resolved by the party, but by NPCs ...


10

Yes, you are understanding this correctly. For your convenience every skill states explicitly whether it suffers from armor check penalty. There are ways to partially avoid this penalty - masterwork/special material armors primarily. And there's occasional class abilities (like the Metal Oracle or the Phalanx Soldier and Corsair fighter archetypes) which ...


10

Ugh, found my own answer on page 460. Yes, include dexterity modifier if being held by a creature. From that page, emphasis mine: General descriptions include notes on activation, random generation, and other material. The AC, hardness, hit points, and break DC are given for typical examples of some magic items. The AC assumes that the item is ...


9

For additional thought, the Monk ability is not "add your Wisdom bonus to your AC", which would logically stack. Instead, both abilities specifically define your armor class when not wearing armor (also not using a shield, for Monk). So you end up with your choice of these two definitions for your unarmored AC. AC = 13 + Dex modifier AC = 10 + Dex ...


9

In Pathfinder, bonuses of the same type do not stack. Mage Armor and regular armor (full plate, etc.) both provide an armor bonus, so they do not stack. The same can be said for a shield and the spell Shield — they both apply a shield bonus to AC. When they don't stack, you use the higher of the two bonuses. This means that Shield and Mage Armor do ...


8

Four things you should consider are: You have to equal or exceed the target's AC for the attack to hit. Attack bonuses increase as monsters get stronger, from a combination of base attack bonus and strength/dexterity getting higher. There are circumstances when AC can be reduced, such as being prone, and when attack bonuses can increase, such as flanking. ...


8

This is clearly written in both the player's handbook and even the player's basic rules, in the respective chapter about Combat. I suggest you read either of those before asking basic questions. From the basic rules, page 73 (emphasis mine, identical text is found in the PHB): ATTACK ROLLS When you make an attack, your attack roll determines ...


8

Is that the correct AC? Yes. How is anyone supposed to hit it? A natural 20 on the attack dice always hits Some attacks use Touch AC (which is usually nowhere near that high) Many spells do not require a to-hit roll (area effect, "save-or-suck", etc) At higher levels, you can hit those ACs fairly easily. If you focus on an attribute, you can raise it to ...


7

This information is currently not contained in the rules and is generally in the purview of the DMG (which will not be released until December). Until then, I would class most objects as having a DC of 5 or so (10 - 5 for a Dex of 0). Armored or particularly hard objects would have an AC equivalent to roughly their amount of armor, so somewhere between 10 ...


7

Yes, Armor Check applies to all skills based on Dexterity or Strength. If you're wearing armor with an armor check penalty of -2, you take a -2 penalty on: Acrobatics, Climb, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Fly, Ride, Sleight of Hand, Stealth, and Swim. Notice that these skills are marked with an asterisk in the Skill Summary table on page 89 of the ...


7

Combat Modifiers in the Combat chapter outlines the main conditions that deny Dexterity bonus to AC: Attacker is invisible (attacker gains +2 to attack) Target is blinded (target suffers -2 to AC) Target is cowering, such as from a fear spell (-2 to AC) Target is flat-footed because he has not taken his turn yet in this combat D&D 3.5 only, not ...


7

This information is now covered in the Dungeon Master's Guide and can be found on pages 246 and 247. An object's AC is determined by its substance; things like cloth and paper on the low end of the spectrum (AC 11) with something like adamantine on the high end (AC 23). The size of an object, as well as how resilient it is, is used to determine its Hit ...



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