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38

It's d20 + attack bonus vs. AC, not just d20 vs. AC. For example, the basic ogre in the Monster Manual makes attacks at +8. So that ogre can hit AC 20 on a 12 or higher. Rolling a "natural 20" (i.e. the die itself comes up 20) is a hit regardless of AC, so opponents have at least a 5% chance of inflicting some damage on you. (Damage tends to scale with ...


18

Don't pretend you're a rogue, because Ardents don't look good in leather. You require some real (and exotic) metals between you and the enemy. The thicker, the better. Ask for some mirrored or hydra layered plate platemail +5, as it's in a similar theme to your original gambit armor. Item materials are also important and scale by half-tier1, but your main ...


15

If you're asking "I am aware of monsters with bonuses to attack rolls, but are these the only monsters..." then right here is the misunderstanding. ALL the enemies will have an attack roll bonus. For the very, very weakest enemies (say, a single rat) the bonus will be +0, but that's an exception rather than the rule, usually all enemies appropriate for a ...


15

Yes, that's all there is to it. Modifiers are never applied to THAC0, so when figuring THAC0 based on 1st edition to-hit tables, all you have to do is look up the number you need to hit a target with AC 0. If you're using 2nd edition THAC0 numbers it's even easier: just write down the number for your class and level from table 53 (PHB p. 91) and you're ...


15

Yes. An unarmed strike is a one handed, simple, melee weapon, as such it counts as a weapon for TWF. So for both of your cases, it would be valid. It's even valid for a non-monk as that strike is available to anyone who is proficient in Simple Weapons. The key is that it's not available to someone wielding a shield, an item or a non-weapon implement in ...


13

For Attack: Dexterity vs. AC you roll 1d20 and add your bonuses (using your Dexterity modifier) and compare that to the monster's AC. If the sum is equal to or greater than the monster's AC, the monster is hit with the power. Your bonuses are 1/2 your level + the attribute modifier (in this case Dex) + other bonuses such as weapon proficiency(+2), a ...


12

Yes. Bonuses in 5e are rare, and we don't know all of the details yet, but there is no reason to think that Mage Armor and Shield do not stack. The only thing we really know is that casting a new concentration spell breaks the previous one. Neither of these spells are concentration spells and thusly they would not conflict in that way. 5e does not use ...


11

Your "base AC" is your AC before any modifiers. However, it is not a defined game term at this time as it has little or no use outside of the Mage armor spell. Such modifiers may include: Class based bonuses like from a Fighting style Magic bonuses from items Temporary bonuses from spells. Other things not included in this list. So your "Base AC" is ...


11

I did some more research online and it seems some situations/conditions, where a target is denied its dex bonus to AC, are: Blinded Cowering Flat-Footed (target hasn't yet acted in combat) Attacker is Invisible Stunned Paralyzed Helpless Pinned via Grapple Acrobatics to Cross Narrow Surfaces/Uneven Ground Climbing Running Squeezing Social situations ...


11

This is one of the most annoying and awkward pieces of 3.x rules You don’t get enhancement bonuses to AC, you get enhancement bonuses to armor bonuses So, armors grant an armor bonus to AC. Seems simple enough. Then we have enhancement bonuses. You could, in theory, have an enhancement bonus to AC; if you did, it would stack with an armor bonus, since ...


10

Yes, you are understanding this correctly. For your convenience every skill states explicitly whether it suffers from armor check penalty. There are ways to partially avoid this penalty - masterwork/special material armors primarily. And there's occasional class abilities (like the Metal Oracle or the Phalanx Soldier and Corsair fighter archetypes) which ...


8

Four things you should consider are: You have to equal or exceed the target's AC for the attack to hit. Attack bonuses increase as monsters get stronger, from a combination of base attack bonus and strength/dexterity getting higher. There are circumstances when AC can be reduced, such as being prone, and when attack bonuses can increase, such as flanking. ...


6

Yes, Armor Check applies to all skills based on Dexterity or Strength. If you're wearing armor with an armor check penalty of -2, you take a -2 penalty on: Acrobatics, Climb, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Fly, Ride, Sleight of Hand, Stealth, and Swim. Notice that these skills are marked with an asterisk in the Skill Summary table on page 89 of the ...


5

The spell Mage Armor does specify the type of AC bonus: An invisible but tangible field of force surrounds the subject of a mage armor spell, providing a +4 armor bonus to AC. Therefore, Mage Armor adds to armor DR. Almost everything should clearly indicate what kind of bonus it grants, which will make it clear whether it applies to Defense or to ...


5

You round down unless stated otherwise. So it would have a +0 AC bonus. It could still exist as an armor if you wanted, and could be enhanced with a +1 (and thus have a +1 AC bonus overall). But Tiny versions of mundane +1 AC armor has no AC bonus.


5

Combat Modifiers in the Combat chapter outlines the main conditions that deny Dexterity bonus to AC: Attacker is invisible (attacker gains +2 to attack) Target is blinded (target suffers -2 to AC) Target is cowering, such as from a fear spell (-2 to AC) Target is flat-footed because he has not taken his turn yet in this combat D&D 3.5 only, not ...


5

Just figured this out. It looks like the rules for magic armor changed with HotFL. The masterwork bonus is automatically applied no matter what type of armor you are using. You don't need Layered Plate or Rimefang Plate to get those masterwork bonuses, they are automatically rolled in to the native magic item. The masterwork armors still exist if you want ...


5

Each class has a base THAC0, which is modified by their strength. A basic chart can be seen here. That link also gives baselines for monster's THAC0s. You then subtract your opponent's AC from your THAC0 to get your target number. So if my THAC0 is 15 (1st level fighter, 18(01) strength for a bonus of +3) and I'm fighting someone with 5 AC, 15 - 5 = 10, ...


5

Dual-wielding Monk A simple way is to be a Monk with the Dual Wielder feat, 20 Dex, and 20 Wis. This gives you a 20 AC from Unarmoured Defence, with +1 from the Dual Wielder feat for a total of 21. Defensive Style A Fighter, Ranger, or Paladin can take the Defensive Style feature, which gives them +1 AC when wearing armour. This gives them a maximum of ...


5

This information is currently not contained in the rules and is generally in the purview of the DMG (which will not be released until November). Until then, I would class most objects as having a DC of 5 or do (10 - 5 for a Dex of 0). Armored or particularly hard objects would have an AC equivalent to roughly their amount of armor, so somewhere between 10 ...


5

In D&D there are different times at which AC is effective. In the early game, between levels 1-10 or so AC can be a reliable way to avoid getting hit, after that point Monster To-Hit and other special abilities that avoid AC entirely begin to scale far past what an unoptimized character is capable of having. At that point its more cost effective to just ...


3

All attacks have bonuses, and as you level up, those bonuses keep growing pretty much automatically. Early on in the game, you get a big chunk of AC for very little (your Dex mod, your armor and shield’s base AC), but getting more AC after that requires expensive magical items. As a result, AC is actually quite weak: as you level up, you have to pay a lot ...


3

An easier scheme exists for 1e and 2e. First you need to calculate the characters to hit bonus. You take 10 and subtract what they need to hit AC 10 (10 is worst chance of hitting AC 10 which is a 0 level character in AD&D 1st). Then in combat you roll a d20 add the to hit bonus and add the Monster's armor class if the roll totals 20 or more you hit. ...


3

No. Proficiency only allows you to don that type of armor without suffering disadvantage on all rolls involving strength or dexterity. In that way it is mechanically identical to 3.5 armor proficiency, removing a penalty associated to doning an armor you are not proficient with, but serving to no other purpose, other than maybe being a requirement for ...


2

Yes. There are numerous types of AC Bonuses that come from a wide assortment of items and stack together. AC Bonuses of different types all stack together (and Dodge Bonuses stack even with each other). A common set of AC Bonus types that one might have together would be Armor, Shield, Deflection, and Natural Armor. Each of these can be gained either ...


2

Mage Armor Goes to DR Mage armor provides an Armor bonus to AC, and therefore goes to DR, not Defense. The rule states that Armor in this system keeps all of its normal statistics and qualities, but its armor bonus (including any enhancement bonus added to armor bonus and natural armor bonus ) is converted to DR/armor. Thus all Armor bonuses go to DR. ...


2

What happened here is that unarmored characters and characters wearing light armor (cloth, leather and hide) use their Dex skill to determine AC. However, wearers of Mail, Scale and Plate use only the armor modifier. Formula for AC Light armor AC = Armor Bonus + 1/2 Level + Dex Mod + 10 + Enh + shield bonus + masterwork bonus Heavy Armor AC = ...


2

THAC0 is really the same as the BAB, just handled differently. You can do THAC0-d20 vs AC (if your THAC0 is 20, you need to roll 20 to hit AC 0 because it's 20-20 vs 0), or THAC0-AC vs d20 (in this case it's roll high). If you take THAC0 20 -10 you need to roll 10 or higher on d20, which is exactly like a BAB of +0 vs AC 10. The latter system works better ...


2

Your base AC is exactly what your current AC calculation method says. Base AC is not a defined term, but to me it represents the less situation part of your AC. Current/total AC = base AC + temp/situational bonus/penalties (like those given from the shield spell). You will not be adding your dex mod twice when using Mage Armor. You only (sometimes) add ...


2

While I'm not talking about touch AC (we're talking about invulnerability from "hitter" monsters, right?), your assumptions still do not hold up. I think the basic assumption we need to debunk here is that "some monsters have a bonus to their attack rolls". Every creature in the D&D universe, be it a monster or a NPC with class levels, has a base attack ...



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