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22

This piece is also used on the cover of the AD&D Book of Lairs. In that book's credits, the cover is credited to Clyde Caldwell.


15

This is one of the "portentous runes & glyphs" from the World of Greyhawk boxed set. Here's a pdf of the page on Greyhawk Online (go to the end). It means "uncertain, questionable." Also known as Gygax's rune system, they found their way into many AD&D adventures and such. Greyhawk wise, they appeared on p29-32 of the 1980 Folio, p17 of the Guide, ...


14

You can do a search on deviant art for creative commons art work. The quality will vary though. EDIT: You could also search flickr. if you got o flickr then click search -> advanced search then in there type what ever you are looking for (elf in the example link below), rather you want photo's or drawn art and click the creative common's check box. Example ...


14

here's a brief list of some of the most well known art sites. guess browsing these should keep you engaged for a few years (;D) if you haven't seen'em yet. have fun! :) [cghub] (update) cghub is no more, sadly conceptart.org (various, hundreds at least) cgsociety, 3d (various, hundreds at least) cgsociety, 2d (various, hundreds at least) cgsociety, 3d ...


11

I finally managed to figure it out. I had to search for clipart instead of public domain art. Larry Elmore released the "Character Clip Art & Color Customizing Studio" which is a fancy name for a colouring book. A good portion of the black and white line drawings were clipart and could be used and modified, as long as they weren't resold as clip art (...


11

If you are willing to go for a certain feel, there is a huge body of illustration in the public domain. When I laid out Love in the Time of Seið, which Matthijs Holter and I co-wrote, I found wonderful nordic fantasy illustrations using Google Books. I limited the time frame for results to pre-1910 and then scanned domestic American children's books for ...


11

Turn back one page from the Acolyte Background The art on PH p. 125 (the first page of the Backgrounds section) seems to depict an acolyte. The figure carries a mace (commonly associated with clerics in D&D) is touching what appears to be a holy symbol brooch, and is wearing a white cloak. Several similar character sketches throughout the Backgrounds ...


10

The believe the artist is Tyler Jacobson, he made a bit of a snarky comment about his initials of the painting being removed in post-edit for the "cloudy" effect. His strong style about character in the middle, attacking something offcenter or almost in front of the camera is quite distinctive. Also the way the lighting shaders are in the picture. He used ...


9

Generating 60 CC-licensed black-and-white character portraits was the goal of the Kickstarter project "60 Terrible Character Portraits For Creative Commons Release". The project ended with enough funding to commision 108 character portraits, and the high-resolution images are available for download.


9

There are many character creators for fantasy games in computer gaming. The PC versions of many RPGs have extensive character creators. The Dragon Age series, and the World of Warcraft game have extensive customization options. There is also the custom miniature creator HeroForge - https://www.heroforge.com/ which is designed to let you visualize your own ...


8

In Playing at the World, historian Jon Peterson suggests that both Orcus and Demogorgon originally found their way into D&D via Milton's Paradise Lost. Above these rank-and-file fiends rule the Demon Princes, Orcus and Demogorgon, unique monsters who previously shared a couplet in Milton’s Paradise Lost (“Orcus and Ades, and the dreaded name/Of ...


7

You could actually use the AutoREALM icons, if you don't mind a bit of fiddly work. It is quite easy to vectorize simple graphics. Inkscape (free alternative to Adobe Illustrator) has such a function to trace bitmaps by various attributes of the original image (colour, brightness, edges and so on). You can make a map that's just the AutoREALM icons you want ...


7

This is the symbol for the magic school of Abjuration. You can see it on a lot of different items in the 5E DMG, all of which function by protecting the user in some way: the Ring of Protection, the Scarab of Protection, and the Spellguard Shield, to name a few. You can see the symbols for all the schools in this image from the 3.5 PHB. In the image, the ...


6

The Dark Heresy line has some material; it tends to focus more on the powerful - nobles, etc, but there are a few bits of the seedier side. The Rogue Trader corebook and it's player's guide have pretty good descriptions of the lifestyles of normal ship crew, but I suspect that's still unusual enough to be out of scope. The real images of the lower class ...


6

There's no such thing as a single "official" acolyte appearance — an acolyte is just a low-rank or trainee priest. Use any art for a cleric that suits the specific NPC and religion you desire to portray.


5

Just to help address the above, http://www.fromoldbooks.org/ , http://www.oldbookart.com/ Generally when searching looking for Public Domain or Royalty Free (as opposed to creative commons, which while certainly works, I find has a much smaller body of stuff in it due to it being a license as opposed to a state like Public Domain in which things fall ...


5

This is, indeed, "Dragon's Lair" by Clyde Caldwell. A full-page version of the painting (without any text superimposed) can be found on page 119 of The Art of Dungeons & Dragons Fantasy Game (ISBN 0-88038-161-2)1. This book lists the original source as Dragon magazine #65. The artist's gallery (NFSW) doesn't have a version, but you can find it online ...


5

Oddly enough, the game Space Marine is a fairly good source for this in the audiologs. You find journal entries by various people including a number of random citizens, which I find really drive home what an ork invasion means, and give you glimpses into what they live through. I bet you could find them on youtube. Also, you walk through a number of ...


5

No one will care about your game in 35 years. You will be lucky if they care about it in 3 years. If they do care about it in 35 years, doubtless you will have a new version with new art. D&D isn't still using the same illustrations from 35 years ago now are they? Many people, and I see this in the tech startup world all the time, get wrapped around ...


5

There is a free web-based tool called Hero Machine. It has several versions -- modern, superhero, and fantasy, at least -- and does exactly what you're after. Character images are stored as text strings that allow the Hero Machine to recreate the illustration when reloaded, though you can also use a screen dumper or print-to-file to save an actual image ...


4

It would seem that Posthuman Studios gets works made as a "work made for hire" then releases them under CC licenses. It wouldn't surprise me overly if other games used a similar system; the copyright licenses in the most recent Earthdawn, Shadowrun, and Legend of the 5 Rings (just what I happened to have) don't mention any distinctions between licensed art ...


4

I'm pretty satisfied with the brushes and hex templates on this post, even if I'm not a big fan of hex maps. Make sure you snap to the grid to make it easier. You could also try to make your own brushes. I don't consider myself good with graphics, but I did manage to get some usable maps.


4

The Cartographers' Guild is a site for devotees of map-making in fictional worlds. There is some serious talent there, and they're a very sharing community. In particular, you'll be interested in the Mapping Elements subforum, especially the sticky posts at the top. There are lists and lists of free symbols, and more are shared and created by Guild members ...


4

I usually get good results simply by doing Google Image searches, often with a site:paizo.com or site:wizards.com if I'm looking for D&D type images, or similar scope limiter. If your initial search is mixing in something less useful you can often exclude, like if you want pirate pics but without lame Halloween costumes, search pirate -costume. I make a ...


4

I am not sure who did that exact piece but the artists listed are: Tomasz Jedruszek, Sam Araya, Tom Biondolillo, Avery Butterworth, Craig S Grant, Will & Sara Hindmarch, Mike Huddleston, Becky Jollensten, Mathias Kollros, Patrick McEvoy, Justin Norman, Nick Stakal, Arend Stahrmann, Andy Trabbold, and Chad Michael Ward


3

Take a look at a new book called "Fantasy Art Characters To Copy." It features original "conditional" copyright free fantasy characters. The conditions of use are very liberal.I have the book - it's incredible. The images are high quality, they are not stock pics. They are on blank backgrounds and you can copy them for RPGs or use them in your own ...


3

Dover Books has sold compilations of royalty-free art for decades. Very affordable books, no additional costs. Be sure to review the extensive list on the left side of: http://store.doverpublications.com/by-subject-art.html Notable: Fantastic Ornament: 110 Designs and Motifs "Swirling with gargoyles, devils, dragons, griffins, and other images that haunt ...


3

Epilogue.net is my first port of call for fantasy/sci-fi pictures and landscapes, the search is very helpful and there's a lot there to see. Digital Blasphemy is a bit more obscure, but has some fantastic digital artwork backgrounds that I've found very inspiring; mostly for sci-fi but there are some wonderful woodland scenes as well. Elfwood is an ...


3

Having scoured the net for sources, I've found that - not too surprisingly - it is widely known that the Adeptus Arbites, the planetary police force of the Warhammer 40k universe was heavily inspired by Judge Dredd - and that the same goes for the cities as well: Your average WH40k city/planet (that is, the kind I specified in the Q) is probably quite ...



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