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23

The specifics are going to depend on your implementation of Fate, but in Standard Fate (and Fate Core), when you Create an Advantage (or create a temporary aspect), you get a free invocation. I'm going to quote the rule from Fate Core: Free invocations work like normal ones except in two ways: no fate points are exchanged, and you can stack them with ...


22

Summary: Negative aspects are easy "push button here" dispensers for Fate points, but spamming that button needlessly is boring at best. Two things need to be kept in mind: drama, and the Fate point economy. Being stymied or drained of Fate points by the same problem over and over isn't dramatic or interesting, so don't do it. But the Fate points must flow! ...


20

Fate points represent your ability as a player to manipulate the fate of the story. Aspects on your character(or elsewhere) just provide the pretext. In FATE games, you do not simulate a world. You simulate a story and your skills represent what kinds of stories your character usually gets involved in. With fate points, you as the player get the power to ...


17

A lot depends on the implementation of Fate/the type of aspect it is, and the story that is being told in the creation of the character. Type of Aspect In some uses of Fate, all aspects are the same- no aspect is more important to the creation of the character than the other. In others, there is a High Concept or some aspect that to a large extent defines ...


17

You do appear to be missing some stuff here. Here's how I'd handle your situation. (As a foreword: bear in mind your players and the player characters being unaware of an aspect are two very different things, so you should make sure you distinguish between them.) Entering the Scene You said you entered a Forest with a River in it. Both of these are ...


16

Wraith's answer is absolutely right: Fate is designed to be open and transparent, and revealing aspects is crucial to the players' mechanical viability in the narrative. Now, DFRPG itself occupies a rather peculiar niche in the Fate paradigm and its narrative style unfortunately led to a lot of engine philosophy being implied rather than stated. So I'm ...


16

There are at least 4 ways to use FATE aspects: Tag opponent for bonus to self - you pay 1 Fate get tagged by opponent for penalty to self - You get 1 fate get compelled by opponent to force a move or prevent a move or attack- you get 1 fate if you accept, pay 1 if not get tagged by opponent to who narrates the outcome - You get 1 fate if you accept. To ...


16

Aspects determine what is important in the scene. Those scene aspects defined when the scene is framed are the ones that the GM deemed to be important in the scene; the ones that add flavor to the narrative. However, narrative games like fate share the narrative direction with the players. In this particular case, though the GM didn't deem the fact that ...


16

It becomes part of the character when it's more important than the other aspects that they have. Something as ephemeral as the Create Advantage action probably won't change a character in such a fundamental way, and (probably) neither will getting an item. Hmm. Example time: We've got a character with a couple of aspects: "Always stand up against ...


13

Aspects become unimportant only when the players have no fate points to tag them. In the question's example of the columns, the first guy gets the free tag, and anyone else who cares to spend fate upon tagging them gets the bonus, but they don't tag them unless and until it matters… when they've failed to dodge and want to up their dodge roll by 2. Never ...


13

Was reading through and found this blurb on YS 106: The procedure to invoke an aspect that isn't on your character is precisely the same as a regular invocation: just declare how that aspect is relevant, spend a fate point, and take a +2 or a reroll. The only thing to keep in mind is that, if you're invoking an aspect on another PC or on a NPC ...


12

One of the problems that I run into with Fate is the preconceived notions of what a GM is, and the role played in other games. Fate is about the story, more than the system, i.e. the story utilizes the system rather than being constrained by it. So, though it may seem that you are letting the players know about something that they do not, what you are ...


12

Fate is more of a toolkit so you can use the tools in it to build game mechanics suited to your intended story atmosphere. The major tools in Fate are: Aspects, Stunts, Skills, Stress tracks and consequences. For your specific case, I'd construct a limiting mechanic using a new stress track for the whole mission. Let's call it the Budget stress track. ...


11

As he attempts to hurdle the beam, you could compel his slash to the calf consequence to make the attempt harder. That's a valid use, but it's not a compel. It's invoking your opponent's aspect for your roll. (Or for the fixed difficulty.) A compel would be preventing the leap in the first place... Player: "I'm going to leap the beam" GM: holds out ...


11

Those columns are probably best defined as a free-taggable aspect. No fate points required to tag it. It sometimes becomes tedious to define aspects for everything you describe, so feel free to let your players deduce aspects from your descriptions (pending approval of course) and let them tag those aspects from then on, for free or by paying the fate ...


10

Dresden Files is pretty tracking-light compared to D&D; the only character assets that really need tracking are the Stress tracks (which work fine on character sheets) and Fate points. For my games I've been using the following: A stack of poker chips for Fate points. This makes it easy to keep the Fate economy moving quickly; I can take them when spent, ...


10

In-fiction awesomeness is more appropriate as a reward than mechanical advantages. Players love to see their characters being awesome. Doing this leverages Fate's essential design, which is to move in a regular oscillation from narration to mechanics and back again. There are mechanical rewards possible, but Fate doesn't provide any guidance for what ...


10

To answer the question you explicitly asked: You control what is hidden and what is not as the storyteller. All aspects should be known except those you are specifically hiding, the Fate Rules suggest there are a few ways to do this, specifically: In those cases, it is recommended that you don’t make an aspect directly out of whatever fact you’re ...


9

The best thing to do is write multi-faceted aspects as much as possible, so that they withstand the rigors of a shifting storyscape, including a jittery cast. In other words, make sure your aspects aren't too focused. Make them implicit if needed. If Bob has Suspicious of Joan as an aspect, redefine it as Suspicious of blondes with a southern accent ...


9

There is a similar concept in Strands of Fate that was called (IIRC) Setting Aspects. I see nothing in Fate Core preventing you from having exactly the same. I'd have them separate from issues, though. Pros : More Aspects means more opportunities. That's more stuff to compel, more stuff to invoke. They can also help define what you want from your game - ...


9

DFRPG had mechanics for situations similar to this, and I think you could adapt them easily to Fate Core. Naturally, codifying them into house rules is probably to be avoided, but they're good options to have in mind because they give you an idea of the narrative/mechanical scope that previous Fate systems have expected this kind of thing to produce. ...


8

It would simply give you excuses for invokes and compels, based on the aspect text. Nothing less, nothing more. — Wesroth attacks Quadron using his longsword, with Fighting 3 — Ok but Quadron has a Long Spear, here's a compel for you, this fate point says Wesroth spends this exchange trying to close in with Quadron, struggling to find an opening. ...


8

For resistance to fire: It's pretty straightforward to use stunts and extras. Because I am a dragon, I have armor:2 against heat-based attacks. or Because I am a dragon, I have +2 to defence rolls against fire. If you go this route, then stress and consequences you do take will probably represent an attack finally penetrating your resistance. ...


7

First, there is no need for an obvious element or trait of a scene to be written down as an aspect in order for it to be tagged. I'd even go so far as to say that they don't even need to be stated aloud. If, for example, someone wants to sneak away from the scene of a fight in the middle of a punk show, I'd let them tag "loud music", "crushing crowd", and ...


7

When I run the game, I generally see the difference between Invocation for Effect and Compel as the difference between The World At Large and The PCs. Invocation for Effect generally makes something happen. I use Invocation for Effect on NPCs, as seen here, and on the environment. Compels generally make a PC act or fail to act. I've used Compels both ways, ...


7

You can do this both ways. Which way you decide as a group to handle scene aspects will subtly but powerfully change the way your games works. Consider this passage from Fate Core (Electronic Edition, p. 59): In Fate, aspects do two major things: they tell you what’s important about the game, and they help you decide when to use the mechanics. and ...


6

This reminds me of a link you yourself posted to me. The issue I believe will be solved by not having Too-specific aspects. As noted in http://www.rickneal.ca/?p=619 The original aspect might have had a base on a previous story. But a good aspect will have people tagging it even if they didn't have any means to be a part of that specific encounter. Like ...


6

Yes you would definitely get the extra bonus if you spend the fate point to invoke the aspect. It may* represent your character's extra effort in making the darkness work to his advantage, above the natural effect it provides. * That being said, I must say I don't like the idea of "situational modifiers" in a FATE game. The way I understand it, in FATE, ...


6

Short answer: Not necessarily It should depend on how you want to associate the different concepts in the aspect. When you say Gnome illusionist in search of power and prestige, you imply that the search for power and prestige is taking place within the bounds of being a gnome illusionist, so, say, this character would dream of being the grandmaster of the ...


6

The summary: No, the character cannot fire once the aspect is applied. However, whether the aspect is successfully applied is the result of a contested roll: one character is trying to Create Advantage, and it's possible that the other character will try to Defend against that. Using the most recent version of the FATE Core Rules, this falls under the ...



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