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21

The specifics are going to depend on your implementation of Fate, but in Standard Fate (and Fate Core), when you Create an Advantage (or create a temporary aspect), you get a free invocation. I'm going to quote the rule from Fate Core: Free invocations work like normal ones except in two ways: no fate points are exchanged, and you can stack them with ...


17

A lot depends on the implementation of Fate/the type of aspect it is, and the story that is being told in the creation of the character. Type of Aspect In some uses of Fate, all aspects are the same- no aspect is more important to the creation of the character than the other. In others, there is a High Concept or some aspect that to a large extent defines ...


16

There are at least 4 ways to use FATE aspects: Tag opponent for bonus to self - you pay 1 Fate get tagged by opponent for penalty to self - You get 1 fate get compelled by opponent to force a move or prevent a move or attack- you get 1 fate if you accept, pay 1 if not get tagged by opponent to who narrates the outcome - You get 1 fate if you accept. To ...


16

Wraith's answer is absolutely right: Fate is designed to be open and transparent, and revealing aspects is crucial to the players' mechanical viability in the narrative. Now, DFRPG itself occupies a rather peculiar niche in the Fate paradigm and its narrative style unfortunately led to a lot of engine philosophy being implied rather than stated. So I'm ...


13

Was reading through and found this blurb on YS 106: The procedure to invoke an aspect that isn't on your character is precisely the same as a regular invocation: just declare how that aspect is relevant, spend a fate point, and take a +2 or a reroll. The only thing to keep in mind is that, if you're invoking an aspect on another PC or on a NPC ...


12

There's really no answer to that. First of all, if we look at skills. BESM did something quite smart which is have genre based skill costs rather than fixed skill costs, most systems don't even do that, yet they have similar costs. FATE is already like that, so you've already got a situation where the ranks aren't worth the same even if you pay the same. ...


12

One of the problems that I run into with Fate is the preconceived notions of what a GM is, and the role played in other games. Fate is about the story, more than the system, i.e. the story utilizes the system rather than being constrained by it. So, though it may seem that you are letting the players know about something that they do not, what you are ...


11

As he attempts to hurdle the beam, you could compel his slash to the calf consequence to make the attempt harder. That's a valid use, but it's not a compel. It's invoking your opponent's aspect for your roll. (Or for the fixed difficulty.) A compel would be preventing the leap in the first place... Player: "I'm going to leap the beam" GM: holds out ...


11

Fate is more of a toolkit so you can use the tools in it to build game mechanics suited to your intended story atmosphere. The major tools in Fate are: Aspects, Stunts, Skills, Stress tracks and consequences. For your specific case, I'd construct a limiting mechanic using a new stress track for the whole mission. Let's call it the Budget stress track. ...


10

Dresden Files is pretty tracking-light compared to D&D; the only character assets that really need tracking are the Stress tracks (which work fine on character sheets) and Fate points. For my games I've been using the following: A stack of poker chips for Fate points. This makes it easy to keep the Fate economy moving quickly; I can take them when spent, ...


10

In-fiction awesomeness is more appropriate as a reward than mechanical advantages. Players love to see their characters being awesome. Doing this leverages Fate's essential design, which is to move in a regular oscillation from narration to mechanics and back again. There are mechanical rewards possible, but Fate doesn't provide any guidance for what ...


9

There is a similar concept in Strands of Fate that was called (IIRC) Setting Aspects. I see nothing in Fate Core preventing you from having exactly the same. I'd have them separate from issues, though. Pros : More Aspects means more opportunities. That's more stuff to compel, more stuff to invoke. They can also help define what you want from your game - ...


9

DFRPG had mechanics for situations similar to this, and I think you could adapt them easily to Fate Core. Naturally, codifying them into house rules is probably to be avoided, but they're good options to have in mind because they give you an idea of the narrative/mechanical scope that previous Fate systems have expected this kind of thing to produce. ...


8

It would simply give you excuses for invokes and compels, based on the aspect text. Nothing less, nothing more. — Wesroth attacks Quadron using his longsword, with Fighting 3 — Ok but Quadron has a Long Spear, here's a compel for you, this fate point says Wesroth spends this exchange trying to close in with Quadron, struggling to find an opening. ...


7

When I run the game, I generally see the difference between Invocation for Effect and Compel as the difference between The World At Large and The PCs. Invocation for Effect generally makes something happen. I use Invocation for Effect on NPCs, as seen here, and on the environment. Compels generally make a PC act or fail to act. I've used Compels both ways, ...


6

Yes you would definitely get the extra bonus if you spend the fate point to invoke the aspect. It may* represent your character's extra effort in making the darkness work to his advantage, above the natural effect it provides. * That being said, I must say I don't like the idea of "situational modifiers" in a FATE game. The way I understand it, in FATE, ...


6

The summary: No, the character cannot fire once the aspect is applied. However, whether the aspect is successfully applied is the result of a contested roll: one character is trying to Create Advantage, and it's possible that the other character will try to Defend against that. Using the most recent version of the FATE Core Rules, this falls under the ...


6

Short answer: Not necessarily It should depend on how you want to associate the different concepts in the aspect. When you say Gnome illusionist in search of power and prestige, you imply that the search for power and prestige is taking place within the bounds of being a gnome illusionist, so, say, this character would dream of being the grandmaster of the ...


6

The main limit of what aspects can be used for what actions is basically what the table will accept - your GM and your fellow players. My rule of thumb is, if I can say it in a sentence with a straight face, it works. I.E. "Because Chivalry's Not Dead Dammit, I hit the demon that's attacking my girlfriend really hard." So lets try that. "Because of my Fiery ...


5

Basics There seems to already be something in-built to the setting creation and issues that would cover your ... issue. There are two kinds of issues: Current Issues, that are defined as you say. Impending issues however, seem to cover exactly what you are asking. From Fate Core p.22 Impending Issues: These are things that have begun to rear their ...


4

I created a foldable character sheet that really helps me keep track, especially since it makes the list of aspects directly related to the player at the table instead of being a list. I also have used other variations to keep track of aspects and such not directly related to a character- index cards, whiteboards, notepads. Index Cards - put aspects on ...


4

Playing Fate games we always have a wet-erase gridded mat (a large Chessex battlemat, to be precise) on the main play space. Maps and drawings get sketched on it to illustrate things during the game. Lots of temporary Aspects go particularly well there, since they tend to be attached to map locations or are otherwise associated with something on the map. ...


4

It's low tech but my favourite approach is to have index cards for the PCs, listing their aspects and folded into a sort of triangle so that the list is facing the table as a whole. Then - a few sheets of paper in the center of the table that with titles like "Scene" and so on where more general aspects can be place, on their own (unfolded) index cards. ...


4

It's better to split them. Aspects that are focused are easier to compel, and having a wider variety of aspects to use lends more flexibility to the character. Moreover, things like "illusionist" might be better as magic-related Skills or Stunts, rather than as an Aspect.


4

This question was the result of a discussion on G+. After I asked here, Fred Hicks dropped by with his take on the situation. Compelling is purely narrative- the teeth are in the story to steal from the OP on that thread. Invoking is highly mechanical; there are three things you can do on an invoke; add to a roll, re-roll, or make the opponent's life ...


4

Note: I don't have DF - I'm answering based upon general knowledge of FATE - SOTC, LOA, Diaspora, SBA Compels, generally, are for forcing a non-action: don't attack, don't act now, don't go there, don't pick that target. Invoke for effect is more broad, and not exactly standard FATE, but is a better fit, and is itself a variation on a compel, anyway, when ...


4

Under what circumstances might more metatextual elements of the game's setting or theme be appropriate as aspects in Fate Core? The short answer is all of them. Using the rule of Aspects are always true you can invert it to All true things are aspects with the corollary but only some true things are useful . Once the metatextual is textual it becomes ...


4

Yes, that's totally legit. So long as you can describe how your character's aspect is beneficial to the circumstance of the roll, you can spend the Fate point. The GM (and the rest of the group) may ask for more clarification if they're unsure how you're justifying the use, though. Sometimes it'll turn out they think it's too much of a stretch and the GM ...


3

I've played Spirit of the Century with scoped aspects. Players still use only the obvious, but do so in a different manner. They'll grab the most obvious opponent aspect, the most obvious character aspect, and if desperate the most obvious zone or scene aspect. Anything past that is almost always an auto-success... as there's no "diminishing returns" ...


3

Here is a totally new answer, the previous version was based on my understanding of FATE back when I really hadn't understood it that well :) In FATE, all the game mechanics are story facilitators, not situation simulators. The rolls you make and the modifiers you put on them are there to give the story some structure and help you tell it, but they say ...



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