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39

The rule on modifiers applies only after you've determined a base roll. And to do that you must first resolve disadvantage (PHB page 173): Use the higher of the two rolls if you have advantage, and use the lower roll if you have disadvantage. Therefore, you always take the lower roll. This is a direct inverse of this answer here for rolling a critical ...


32

Let's break this down a little bit using the Basic Rules you have available. Page 73: Attack Rolls To make an attack roll, roll a d20 and add the appropriate modifiers. If the total of the roll plus modifiers equals or exceeds the target’s Armor Class (AC), the attack hits. Pretty straight forward. You roll a D20 and add modifiers, in ...


29

You should have made a total of 3 attack rolls - 1 for the staff, and 1 for each unarmed strike in the Flurry of Blows. Every time you make an attack, you should make an attack roll. This is, actually, the definition of an attack: If there’s ever any question whether something you’re doing counts as an attack, the rule is simple: if you’re making an ...


18

The original reason was to differentiate the Fighting Man from the other classes as a combat specialist The original Strength bonus to hit, solely available to Fighting Men (what we now call Fighters/Martials) was not introduced until the Greyhawk Supplelment to OD&D (1 Feb 1975, TSR). In the first combat system, the only original bonus "+ to hit" ...


14

As far as I know, there's no official way to do it. The Players Handbook simply says "Make an attack roll. Compare your attack roll to the target's defense... to determine whether you hit or miss." (Page 269.) That leaves a lot of scope to the players and GMs to decide how to make that comparison. I've seen GMs do it both of the ways you mention. I've seen ...


13

Your Base Attack Bonus is +6/+1 if you have six levels in a Full BAB class. This doesn't change. Your Attack Bonus, on the other hand, will be your BAB + Str modifier + other bonuses, in this case 6+3+1, as you thought. Iterative attacks are at -5, so yes, your total attack bonus on a full attack is +10/+5.


13

For Attack: Dexterity vs. AC you roll 1d20 and add your bonuses (using your Dexterity modifier) and compare that to the monster's AC. If the sum is equal to or greater than the monster's AC, the monster is hit with the power. Your bonuses are 1/2 your level + the attribute modifier (in this case Dex) + other bonuses such as weapon proficiency(+2), a ...


13

No, you don't always require an attack roll. Only some among aggressive spells require attack rolls. Attack roll is generally tied with touching the target (like chill touch you have mentioned) or firing a ray to the target (like disintegrate). There are three kinds of criteria for determining the success of spell. Touch attack: You make an attack roll ...


12

Extensively use Tome of Battle strikes. The strikes sometimes involve multiple attacks, but often involve a single attack with greatly enhanced properties. This can help greatly. But note that even high-level initiators often still use regular full-attacks: you simply cannot easily replicate the reliability and sheer damage of a full-attack with a single ...


11

He just uses the +2 for the short sword melee attack. That site has already calculated the attack bonus. As you calculated, the goblin is getting is +1 from BAB, +0 from STR, and +1 from size, for a total attack bonus of +2. For comparison, note that he has a +4 with his shortbow: +1 from BAB, +2 from DEX, and +1 from size. (You use dexterity rather than ...


11

I'd use rules provided in the Dungeon Master's Guide, page 42. Being the fire log drop a trick you could perform many times during an encounter, and something that does not consume standard actions (!), I'd use the Low Normal Damage expression of the table at page 42. That is: 1d6+3 damage at 1st, 2nd and 3rd level, up to 2d8+10 at 28th, 29th and 30th ...


11

How to make attack rolls is described on pages 215-7 of the Rules Compendium in pretty good detail. To sum it up. The Player's Handbook has a smaller version on page 274. When making an attack roll add the following to 1d20: The modifier for the attack power the character is using. This will be a stat bonus + 1/2 of the character's level. The permanent ...


9

Yes, you can reroll each of your attack dice that rolled a 1 or a 2. Just for reference, this is what it says in the PHB: When you roll a 1 or 2 on a damage die for an attack you make with a melee weapon that you are wielding with two hands, you can reroll the die and must use the new roll, even if the new roll is a 1 or a 2. The "When" here is ...


8

This all explained pretty clearly in the rules, but I can see how confusion might stick if you are new to it all and are starting from some misconceptions. Most importantly, the d10 is used for damage when fighting with a halberd, but you always roll a d20 to see if you hit, no matter what the weapon. (A d20 is used for most checks to see if something ...


8

Not exactly. Your Base Attack Bonus (BAB) is your base attack bonus - it is solely the attack bonus granted by all your classes, and nothing more. Feats and modifiers don´t change that value. However, you don't use JUST the BAB on your attack rolls. An attack roll is the sum of your BAB with all the appropriated bonuses and penalties. This is called Total ...


8

Here is what a Level 30 character could have, if optimized to hit. +15 Levels +10 prime stat of 30 (assumes an extra +2 to the prime stat from Epic Destiny) +3 an expertise feat +6 a +6 weapon +3 weapon proficiency bonus That's +37 without anything special added. You'll need an 11+ to hit Demogorgon, right at 50/50. Attacks against other defenses ...


7

I think the best you're going to come up with at this time is to add a macro for your roll so /roll 2d20k1+10 And then a macro for each of your damage expressions, both the critical damage and also the normal damage so /roll 1d12+8 And /roll 20+1d6 You'll have to figure out when to roll which on your own. The other option would be the set up ...


7

At the table, I ruled that the 'result' is the total value of the roll and not the resolution of the action. Later reading of the Rules Compendium led me to the following: p.22 -- Making Checks, [make roll, add modifiers] "3. Compare the result to a target number. If the result equals or exceeds the target number, the check is a success." ...


7

Unfortunately the 4e character builder is correct. The difference is between the implement and weapon keywords. Only those attacks with the weapon keyword add the proficiency bonus from your weapon. While a bow can be an excellent choice for the right kind of bard, it depends strongly on what you want to do with your bard. In this case, hyper-accuracy on ...


7

You make an attack roll for each attack, regardless of how much damage the attack deals. You also need to know that you can only use your Sneak Attack once per turn. So you make one attack roll for your first attack, which deals 2d6+3 if it hits, assuming you've fulfilled the conditions for your Sneak Attack. Then you make another attack roll for your ...


7

You have to take the lowest roll when you have disadvantage (as mentioned by DaFluid). So you have a critical hit only if you roll two 20, which is rather unlikely, obviously. You may calculate the likelihood: since you have 5% to roll a 20 (1 / 20 = 0.05), you have 0.05 * 0.05 = 0.0025, or 0.25% of rolling two 20 when rolling an attack with disadvantage. ...


6

To your final question: "Are there any official rules/guidelines to support [DM asking for defense?", in the basic game, no. I don't know about official tournaments, or sanctioned events, but for casual gameplay, they strongly encourage you to do whatever is best for your group/situation. I agree with you, that in many situations, just saying what the ...


6

It is exactly as you're saying in your last paragraph: you first roll a d20 plus modifiers to see if you hit or not, then if you hit you roll for damage, a d10 in your case plus a different set of modifiers. From page 9, Weapons: When you make an attack with a weapon, you roll a d20 and add your proficiency bonus (but only if you are proficient with the ...


5

This may seems too simplistic for an answer, but it might help: One thing which worked really well for me when I was teaching children D&D 3 - 3.5 (even as young as 6 years old), was the combination of these two basic ideas: Use the fast dice variant: roll all attack and damage rolls simultaneously, use different colored dice for different attacks. ...


5

It is relatively trivial to make a spreadsheet calculate average damage for iterative attacks. So long as you know all the variables, reducing attacks vs AC x to an average damage means that you can roll the highest attacks, because they're fun, and then for the subsidiary attacks, to simply apply the average damage. The player should create a lookup table ...


5

Your examples are distinct Damage rolls, in particular, are completely different from any other check, since they do not use a d20, but rather anywhere from 1d2 to 2d6 (and that’s just for player-race-sized options!) plus various “damage bonuses” that vary from weapon to weapon (non-composite projectile weapons get none, light weapons get ...


5

The spell would confer exactly what it says. Your base attack bonus becomes equal to your character level As a 30th level character (in this case Fighter), your BAB would become +30. You would still only have 4 attacks a round however, but considering AC of epic-level monsters, that is a decent buff. Point Breakdown You do get a +30 BAB from the ...


4

Show them the numbers for faster combat When I have time to set it up, I create little tent cards for each monster showing its name and four defenses. A picture matching the mini or pog would be even better. This never seems to ruin anyone's "flow." It just saves them time asking me if they hit and speeds up combat. Faster (and less discussion about it) ...


4

NO The rules compendium directly addresses this issue: Rules Compendium p.275: Weapons as Implements and Vice Versa Some adventurers have the ability to use a weapon as an implement or an implement as a weapon, and some magic items grant this ability. For example, the holy avenger weapon can be used as a holy symbol, which is a type of ...


4

You know the result of the roll, whether or not you know the outcome depends on the type of roll. If it's a saving throw, you likely know the outcome since you only need a 10. However if it's an attack roll or skill check, you know your total, but you don't know the target's defense or the check's DC so you don't know the result (unless of course you have ...



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