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This may seems too simplistic for an answer, but it might help: One thing which worked really well for me when I was teaching children D&D 3 - 3.5 (even as young as 6 years old), was the combination of these two basic ideas: Use the fast dice variant: roll all attack and damage rolls simultaneously, use different colored dice for different attacks. ...


2

I got this idea from mxzyplk answer to use a single roll, and from KRyan comments on how this can nerf the warriors in a substantial way. I did the math, and... yep. Rolling a single dice can be harmfull for the figther. Rolling multiple die can, however, be harmfull for the fun, since it can take a long time to resolve a single turn. How we can resolve ...


4

It is relatively trivial to make a spreadsheet calculate average damage for iterative attacks. So long as you know all the variables, reducing attacks vs AC x to an average damage means that you can roll the highest attacks, because they're fun, and then for the subsidiary attacks, to simply apply the average damage. The player should create a lookup table ...


3

Roll Once This increases swinginess but not the average output. Simply roll the d20 once for an entire attack routine and apply the different bonuses to it. This reduces time to resolution dramatically. For example, a fighter with +12/+7/+2, roll d20 and get a 10 - you hit ACs 22, 17, 12. Works fine for claw/claw/bite and any other kind of combo. What ...


12

Extensively use Tome of Battle strikes. The strikes sometimes involve multiple attacks, but often involve a single attack with greatly enhanced properties. This can help greatly. But note that even high-level initiators often still use regular full-attacks: you simply cannot easily replicate the reliability and sheer damage of a full-attack with a single ...



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