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1

Simply put, to attack you roll 1 20 sided dice (1d20), you add 4 extra score on top of your rolled score, and now you have your attack score. For example you rolled a d20, and it turns to be 17, now you put 4 to make it 21. Your enemy's AC is 16, so you hit him. Now roll 1d10 plus your damage modifier. Good luck !


2

Item's generally don't have properties to boost accuracy Weapon accuracy is tied to 2 things inherent to the item itself: Weapon proficiency bonus and magic item enhancement bonus. Since you've gtot inherent bonuses on the magic item enhancement bonus doesn't matter and since you are using implements, there is no proficiency bonus to tap into. 4e really ...


0

While there's no way for Roll20 to automatically modify a roll's formula based on another roll, the prebuilt 5th edition character sheets have a decent method of working around it that you could rework for 4e's purposes. Basically, due to the Advantage/Disadvantage mechanics that anyone could have at any time (advantage is very similar to Oath of Enmity's ...


0

If your strength is an 18 and you have a +4 modifier than you will have a +6 (+2 proficiency bonus at level 1) to roll the dice to hit your target. With an AC of 16 this means you need a 10 or higher on a d20 to hit. This means you have a 50% chance to hit your target at level 1. After figuring out you have a hit, you then get to roll your 1d10 with a +4. ...


29

Let's break this down a little bit using the Basic Rules you have available. Page 73: Attack Rolls To make an attack roll, roll a d20 and add the appropriate modifiers. If the total of the roll plus modifiers equals or exceeds the target’s Armor Class (AC), the attack hits. Pretty straight forward. You roll a D20 and add modifiers, in ...


8

This all explained pretty clearly in the rules, but I can see how confusion might stick if you are new to it all and are starting from some misconceptions. Most importantly, the d10 is used for damage when fighting with a halberd, but you always roll a d20 to see if you hit, no matter what the weapon. (A d20 is used for most checks to see if something ...


6

It is exactly as you're saying in your last paragraph: you first roll a d20 plus modifiers to see if you hit or not, then if you hit you roll for damage, a d10 in your case plus a different set of modifiers. From page 9, Weapons: When you make an attack with a weapon, you roll a d20 and add your proficiency bonus (but only if you are proficient with the ...



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