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29

You should have made a total of 3 attack rolls - 1 for the staff, and 1 for each unarmed strike in the Flurry of Blows. Every time you make an attack, you should make an attack roll. This is, actually, the definition of an attack: If there’s ever any question whether something you’re doing counts as an attack, the rule is simple: if you’re making an ...


27

Area effect spells generally don't involve attack rolls. This might be why you're having a hard time finding it. 4e has got you used to making attacks against all targets in an AoE; but 5e doesn't work that way, and therefore doesn't tell you to do that anywhere. (It also doesn't say not to, but naturally it can't include every possible negative instruction....


27

The paladin should only get 3 attacks for 2 reasons. The first is that, yes, you are limited to one bonus action per turn. The second is that Polearm Master states: When you take the Attack action [...] you can use a bonus action to make a melee attack... And the Extra Attack class feature states: Beginning at 5th level, you can attack twice, ...


27

Under no circumstances is a wand classified as a one-handed weapon. It does not appear on the weapons table, and all it is capable of doing is letting the user cast the spell contained within: This wand has 7 charges. While holding it, you can use an action to expend 1 or more of its charges to cast the magic missile ...


24

No, dealing damage does not mean you "hit" 4e uses a highly formulaic language. Miss, hit, attack roll and damage - these are all specific game terms. There are no gray areas there. As for hit points, they are an abstraction. Loss of hit points due to Missed attacks could be explained as exhaustion, demoralization, etc. You can even describe the Missed ...


23

No, you cannot draw your dagger and attack with it while retaining your Duelist feature But you can draw your dagger as part of an attack and then use it. The core argument behind this answer is that you can only attack as a bonus action with your offhand weapon when you use your action to attack. When you take the Attack action and attack with a light ...


20

You can only take 1 action per turn. PHB, page 189: On your turn, you can move a distance up to your speed and take one action. The "Attack" action and the "Cast a Spell" action are both actions, listed on page 192. So if you take the Attack action, you can't also cast a spell that requires 1 action to cast (such as firebolt). The Fighter's Extra ...


19

It matters for some characters If you have, for example, Two-Weapon Fighting, Flurry of Blows, Rapid Shot, or haste, you may have more than one attack even though you have low BAB. You would need a Full-Attack to use those. Even with only one attack, some characters (e.g. a 3rd-level Swordlord Fighter) can get other benefits from making a Full Attack, and ...


19

No. The Attack action is a specific action that you take in combat, which can include multiple attacks. From page 71 of the Player's Basic Rules: Attack The most common action to take in combat is the Attack action, whether you are swinging a sword, firing an arrow from a bow, or brawling with your fists. With this action, you make one melee ...


17

The problem in question isn't really covered by the rules. However, there are rules which govern fire in real life that you can use to determine whether a fire will be stronger or burn longer. And those rules can be found with this image right here: In order for there to even have a chance for there to be a fire, there needs to be an ignition source, a ...


17

The answers so far tell you how to allow this but don't address the follow-on problem - that the player is looking for a way to disable an opponent without having to eliminate all of their hit points. The problem with allowing this is that you're over-powering the players relative to the NPCs. So the first conversation should be "if you can do this to ...


16

Howling Wall is probably not a good choice. There are 2 reasons why Howling Wall is likely to not help very much. First, low-fortitude enemies are less common than low-will or low-reflex enemies. Howling Wall is simply going to miss enemies more often than Winged Horde or Arc Lightning. The second reason goes even deeper into monster statistics. You're ...


16

You cannot (usually) attack twice in one turn in D&D 4e. On your turn you have 3 actions, a Standard, Move, and a Minor. Generally your Standard is your attack, your Move generally involves moving, and your Minor is something like Cursing your enemies. You can downgrade actions from a Standard to a Move or a Minor, and a Move to a Minor, but you cannot ...


16

Assassinate gives you advantage on attack rolls. So if a spell requires you to make an attack roll than yes, Assassinate can be used in conjunction with that spell. If it was only meant to be used with weapon attacks than it would specifically say so.


16

Fighters can. Action surge means you can use one action to dash, and the other to attack. Using action surge is a feature, and does not require a bonus action. Outside of that feature... Bonus actions aside seems to be a weird stipulation to put on this being that that is pretty much the only way you could both dash and attack. You move on your turn, and ...


15

No. That 3 is actually it's melee reach. A multi attack stat block in 4e looks like: Effect: The mooncalf makes three melee attacks, each against a different target. When you see a power say melee X, the X refers to the reach of the attack. melee 1 is the default, but you might see 0, 2, 3, or more.


15

A creature's stat block will indicate what kind of multiattack it gets to make. For instance, if we look at a Black Bear (MM pg.318), it says: Multiattack. The bear makes two attacks: one with its bite and one with its claws. If a bear were somehow to pick up a sword or two it wouldn't be able to use them for multiattack. However, if we look at a ...


15

You can find the definition of an attack in the Players Handbook (p. 194). Specifically, it states: If there's ever any question whether something you're doing counts as an attack, the rule is simple: if you're making an attack roll, you're making an attack What the means is that an attack with a physical weapon counts, an attack with a spell counts, ...


14

Yes You can, but with no valid secondary target, the extra damage would be wasted.


14

Yes, it affects the attack roll. You're overthinking it. Marked opponents take a -2 to attack rolls when making attacks that don't include their marker. Deathrattle Viper's secondary attack involves an attack roll. That attack roll takes a -2 if it doesn't include the marker. The reason for the attack roll doesn't matter, and is entirely fluff. (Seriously: ...


14

You use WIS, because inflict wounds is a melee spell attack, not a melee weapon attack. It seems like you're a little unclear on the distinction, which is blurring some lines. Inflict wounds requires you to make a melee spell attack. PHB p. 205 tells us that this will use your spellcasting modifier; WIS for your Clerical spellcasting ability. Basically, it'...


13

Natural Attacks are weird. The pathfinder rules break down what happens. Instead of using the iterative attacks from your base attack bonus, you get a full attack made up of all the natural attacks. The particular bonus depends on whether those attacks are considered primary or secondary (see the table at the link above). In the Oliphaunt's case when you ...


13

Either the text will say that the feat/ability uses a certain ability score, or it will say that you 'may' substitute your normal score with a different one. Therefore, some feats/abilities will only allow one score, while others let you decide. This is because the 'standard' score is the one you use when you make a 'standard' attack - different feats use a ...


13

Shield specifically specifies that you are "hit" with an attack. Parry specifies that you are damaged. Generally things that allow you to use your reaction will proc on one of several conditions: You are targeted. You take this action before you know the outcome of the roll You are hit. You take this action after you know the outcome of the roll You take ...


13

Since previous edition references are OK, this is what the 3.5e Monster Manual has to say (page 312, under natural attacks): Slap or Slam: The creature batters opponents with an appendage, dealing bludgeoning damage.


13

Touch = Melee range for all intents and porpoises. It does not tell you about what the power's attack roll/saving throw/action is. The text of the Lay On Hands ability states: As an action, you can touch a creature and draw power from the pool to restore a number of hit points to that creature, up to the maximum amount remaining in your pool. ...


13

You’re missing the two-weapon fighting combat option rules. Without those, the feat et al. won’t make very much sense. The two-weapon fighting combat option allows you to get an extra attack when you full attack, but all of your attacks in that full attack take a penalty. The extra attack has to be with a different weapon from your regular attack (“offhand” ...


13

No. A character can only take at most one bonus action in their turn. Bonus Actions, PHB p. 189: You can take only one bonus action on your turn, so you must choose which bonus action to use when you have more than one available. Frenzy, PHB p. 19: you can make a single melee weapon attack as a bonus action on each of your turns after this one. ...


12

In Pathfinder, natural attacks are treated somewhat differently from weapon attacks. There is also a section on natural attacks under the Attack Action (not the Full Attack Action) in the Combat section. But the Combat section clearly says, after talking about all these kinds of attacks (weapon, unarmed, natural) that "A character who can make more than one ...


12

Yes. As @ObliviousSage mentioned in comments, not all defenses are made equally, and some are more common than others. Actually going through the books and figuring out which defense “wins” seems very meta-gamey to me and probably isn’t appropriate at most tables, but this is not the only point. The more important point is that one of ...



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