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24

No, dealing damage does not mean you "hit" 4e uses a highly formulaic language. Miss, hit, attack roll and damage - these are all specific game terms. There are no gray areas there. As for hit points, they are an abstraction. Loss of hit points due to Missed attacks could be explained as exhaustion, demoralization, etc. You can even describe the Missed ...


18

It matters for some characters If you have, for example, Two-Weapon Fighting, Flurry of Blows, Rapid Shot, or haste, you may have more than one attack even though you have low BAB. You would need a Full-Attack to use those. Even with only one attack, some characters (e.g. a 3rd-level Swordlord Fighter) can get other benefits from making a Full Attack, and ...


16

Howling Wall is probably not a good choice. There are 2 reasons why Howling Wall is likely to not help very much. First, low-fortitude enemies are less common than low-will or low-reflex enemies. Howling Wall is simply going to miss enemies more often than Winged Horde or Arc Lightning. The second reason goes even deeper into monster statistics. You're ...


14

Yes You can, but with no valid secondary target, the extra damage would be wasted.


14

Yes, it affects the attack roll. You're overthinking it. Marked opponents take a -2 to attack rolls when making attacks that don't include their marker. Deathrattle Viper's secondary attack involves an attack roll. That attack roll takes a -2 if it doesn't include the marker. The reason for the attack roll doesn't matter, and is entirely fluff. (Seriously: ...


12

In Pathfinder, natural attacks are treated somewhat differently from weapon attacks. There is also a section on natural attacks under the Attack Action (not the Full Attack Action) in the Combat section. But the Combat section clearly says, after talking about all these kinds of attacks (weapon, unarmed, natural) that "A character who can make more than one ...


12

Yes. As @ObliviousSage mentioned in comments, not all defenses are made equally, and some are more common than others. Actually going through the books and figuring out which defense “wins” seems very meta-gamey to me and probably isn’t appropriate at most tables, but this is not the only point. The more important point is that one of ...


11

First case: The attack bonus is correct, +4 for strength, +1 BAB, +1 WF. The damage is also correct, 1-1/2 strength bonus. Second case, attack bonus is correct, but the damage is incorrect. You can choose to take a –1 penalty on all melee attack rolls and combat maneuver checks to gain a +2 bonus on all melee damage rolls. This bonus to damage is ...


11

Either the text will say that the feat/ability uses a certain ability score, or it will say that you 'may' substitute your normal score with a different one. Therefore, some feats/abilities will only allow one score, while others let you decide. This is because the 'standard' score is the one you use when you make a 'standard' attack - different feats use a ...


10

First off, dandwiki has a bad reputation. I'm not sure who this is with, but I'd personally suggest using d20srd instead. Here's their excerpt on Incorporeal Creatures (as a subtype): Incorporeal Subtype An incorporeal creature has no physical body. It can be harmed only by other incorporeal creatures, magic weapons or creatures that strike as ...


10

Brilliant does indeed ignore all armor and hardness. You can't sunder with it and disarm is debatable, though Obi-Wan Kenobi managed it. Are you really going to be able to afford brilliant as a weapon enchant anyway; it's a +4 bonus? There's no RAW way to turn off a weapon enchant. You could try to convince your GM to make it an extra-cost option on the ...


10

No, the rules make no mention of any requirement to perform actions of certain types before actions of certain other types. You have a set number of actions of various types (some of which can be exchanged for others), but you can take them in any order.


10

Yes. Both penalties are untyped, and therefore stack with each other. You may have a hard time hitting anything, though!


10

Flurry of Blows Attack Bonus as Phill's answer, but damage includes the full Strength bonus. A monk applies his full Strength bonus to his damage rolls for all successful attacks made with flurry of blows, whether the attacks are made with an off-hand or with a weapon wielded in both hands.


10

It depends on the target line of the spell in question. Most wizard area spells can be targeted anywhere. Area Attack: Origin Square: You choose a square within an area attack’s range as the attack’s origin square, which is where you center or start the area of effect. You need line of effect from a square in your space to the origin square. For a ...


10

In-fiction awesomeness is more appropriate as a reward than mechanical advantages. Players love to see their characters being awesome. Doing this leverages Fate's essential design, which is to move in a regular oscillation from narration to mechanics and back again. There are mechanical rewards possible, but Fate doesn't provide any guidance for what ...


10

It depends on how the feat/ability is written. "Intuitive Attack" from the Book of Exalted Deeds states that you "may" substitute your Wisdom modifier, which means you don't have to.


9

You do not add the monk BAB to Flurry of Blows, it has its own independent BAB, which the Str modifier is added to, ergo +2/+2. If the monk has levels in another class, you would add that BAB to the rolls.


9

DFRPG had mechanics for situations similar to this, and I think you could adapt them easily to Fate Core. Naturally, codifying them into house rules is probably to be avoided, but they're good options to have in mind because they give you an idea of the narrative/mechanical scope that previous Fate systems have expected this kind of thing to produce. ...


9

Yes on both questions. "Casting" Wizards' FuryDDI is a minor action. Once cast (that means: since the same round you activated Wizard's Fury), you can use a minor action to cast Magic Missile. This quick cast is limited to once per turn, but you can also spend a standard action and cast Magic Missile normally. So, these chain of actions is perfectly ...


9

1d6+3 Finesse. When making an attack with a finesse weapon, you can use your choice of your Strength or Dexterity modifier with your attack and damage rolls. - Equipment Rules, P. 4 Any attack made with a weapon that has the finesse keyword lets you use either STR for attack and damage modifiers or DEX for attack and damage modifiers.


9

Yes, swarms can attack adjacent squares Under the definition of melee attacks: Reach: Most characters have a reach of 1 square. Certain powers, feats, and weapons can increase your reach. - Players Handbook p. 270 Unless a power specifies a longer range or shorter range it is always assumed to be range 1, or in other words, adjacent for all melee ...


9

From the SRD (italics mine) Making an Attack of Opportunity An attack of opportunity is a single melee attack, and a character can only make one per round. The character does not have to make an attack of opportunity if the character doesn't want to. The character makes the attack of opportunity at the character's normal base attack bonus. An ...


9

The base form for the Biped Eidolon is: Size Medium; Speed 30 ft.; AC +2 natural armor; Saves Fort (good), Ref (bad), Will (good); Attack 2 claws (1d4); Ability Scores Str 16, Dex 12, Con 13, Int 7, Wis 10, Cha 11 So a base Eidolon will get two claw attacks with a FULL ROUND attack and one claw attack with a normal attack. The "maximum of three ...


9

Fourth edition is very "game-y," which means the actions which happen on the table may not match up with the actions as you perceive them. Since hurting people with real, live weapons relies on you making contact with that person, seeing "damage" on a person implies they've been hit by a weapon. This can lead you to say "If I've hurt someone, I've hit them." ...


8

Can you make an enemy attack themselves? Yes, you can. "One creature of your choice" means any creature, unless the power itself provides a limitation on that. Some powers, such as the Sorcerer's Lightning Strike, have wording like this: "An enemy of your choice other than the target ..." - that limitation isn't made here, so the creature chosen can be the ...


8

That power's mechanical description is not totally clear. Effect: You may fire at as many enemies in burst as you have bullets left in your guns. If you reload, this attack ends. This effect line is fairly clear: if you have five bullets left in your gun, you can fire on five enemies. However, the Attack line says this: Attack: Dexterity - 1 vs. ...


8

“Why” is a question we cannot answer The authors very rarely give us any insight, commentary, or evidence for the reasoning that went into individual rules. As far as I am aware, there is none for this particular rule. That makes it an impossible question to answer. However, I want to address some other points: It doesn’t make sense: the rules often don’t ...


7

Mixing weapon and natural attacks is a mess. Fortunately, it is not what happens in this example. Here you see 2 full attack options: one for 4-hand multiweapon fighting (iterative attacks from main hand, single attacks at highest BAB from off hands, no penalty for multiweapon fighting due to racial ability) and one for all-natural full attack (several ...


7

Short answer: Standard attack = 1 attack action = 1 attack roll at a listed bonus. Full attack = multiple attack actions = listed number of attack rolls at the listed bonuses. Now, let me explain that: Quote from Pathfinder SRD: Multiple Attacks A character who can make more than one attack per round must use the full-attack action (see ...



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