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24

No, dealing damage does not mean you "hit" 4e uses a highly formulaic language. Miss, hit, attack roll and damage - these are all specific game terms. There are no gray areas there. As for hit points, they are an abstraction. Loss of hit points due to Missed attacks could be explained as exhaustion, demoralization, etc. You can even describe the Missed ...


18

It matters for some characters If you have, for example, Two-Weapon Fighting, Flurry of Blows, Rapid Shot, or haste, you may have more than one attack even though you have low BAB. You would need a Full-Attack to use those. Even with only one attack, some characters (e.g. a 3rd-level Swordlord Fighter) can get other benefits from making a Full Attack, and ...


15

No. That 3 is actually it's melee reach. A multi attack stat block in 4e looks like: Effect: The mooncalf makes three melee attacks, each against a different target. When you see a power say melee X, the X refers to the reach of the attack. melee 1 is the default, but you might see 0, 2, 3, or more.


14

Yes, it affects the attack roll. You're overthinking it. Marked opponents take a -2 to attack rolls when making attacks that don't include their marker. Deathrattle Viper's secondary attack involves an attack roll. That attack roll takes a -2 if it doesn't include the marker. The reason for the attack roll doesn't matter, and is entirely fluff. (Seriously: ...


12

Power Attack applies to all or no attacks that round (and until right before your next turn), as described in the feat (though you can "turn on" the ability before making any attack roll, so you could make some attacks without it and then turn it on for later attacks, if you really wanted to, but you can't turn it off again till your next turn). If you have ...


11

Since previous edition references are OK, this is what the 3.5e Monster Manual has to say (page 312, under natural attacks): Slap or Slam: The creature batters opponents with an appendage, dealing bludgeoning damage.


10

Shield specifically specifies that you are "hit" with an attack. Parry specifies that you are damaged. Generally things that allow you to use your reaction will proc on one of several conditions: You are targeted. You take this action before you know the outcome of the roll You are hit. You take this action after you know the outcome of the roll You take ...


9

The base form for the Biped Eidolon is: Size Medium; Speed 30 ft.; AC +2 natural armor; Saves Fort (good), Ref (bad), Will (good); Attack 2 claws (1d4); Ability Scores Str 16, Dex 12, Con 13, Int 7, Wis 10, Cha 11 So a base Eidolon will get two claw attacks with a FULL ROUND attack and one claw attack with a normal attack. The "maximum of three ...


9

Fourth edition is very "game-y," which means the actions which happen on the table may not match up with the actions as you perceive them. Since hurting people with real, live weapons relies on you making contact with that person, seeing "damage" on a person implies they've been hit by a weapon. This can lead you to say "If I've hurt someone, I've hit them." ...


8

The Strength Penalty to Damage Remains Unadjusted A Medium creature with Strength 8 who's fighting with two weapons, a longsword in one hand and a short sword in his off-hand, will inflict 1d8-1 points of damage with the longsword and 1d6-1 points of damage with the short sword, for example. The same creature with Strength 6 will inflict 1d8-2 points of ...


8

“Why” is a question we cannot answer The authors very rarely give us any insight, commentary, or evidence for the reasoning that went into individual rules. As far as I am aware, there is none for this particular rule. That makes it an impossible question to answer. However, I want to address some other points: It doesn’t make sense: the rules often don’t ...


7

Your friend would be right, except that he missed some key information about specific vs general. The Lich's paralyzing touch attack is a secondary natural weapon, but only because it's specifically noted as such: A lich has a touch attack that it can use once per round as a natural weapon. A lich fighting without weapons uses its natural weapons (if ...


7

Yes. It's right there in the first line of Flurry of Blows (emphasis mine): Starting at 1st level, a monk can make a flurry of blows as a full-attack action. Flurry of blows is specifically a full-attack action, rather than a special full-round action.


7

The rules are behind walls of text and part of a rules salad, but A Creatures Doesn't Get More Than Four Attacks from Its Base Attack Bonus In the sidebar Behind the Curtain: A Limit to Attacks and Saves, the Dungeon Master's Guide says, in part, After 20th level, your base attack bonus never improves. You gain epic bonuses and other bonus on your ...


6

Yes. The Aid Another action gets a lot easier as you gain levels, to the point where it's nearly automatic for all characters at mid to high levels. This is probably for two reasons: At higher levels, you likely have much better things to do than give +2 to AC or an attack roll. At higher levels, +2 means a lot less than at low levels. If my attack ...


6

The only way to use a Feint and a full round attack at the same time is with the Invisible Blade prestige class. At 5th level, that class can Feint as a free action: Uncanny Feint (Ex): At 3rd level, an invisible blade gains the ability to feint in combat (see page 68 of the Player's Handbook) as a move action rather than a standard action. At 5th ...


5

Yes, Animal Companions get all attacks listed in their stat block (primary and secondary) starting at the level that lists them. The animal companion's Multiattack ability (granted at 9th level) states, An animal companion gains Multiattack as a bonus feat if it has three or more natural attacks and does not already have that feat. If it does not have ...


5

Yes Unfortunately I don't have access to the Rules Compendium but in the core, it says in a sidebar: Pick a Square and Attack: Choose a square to attack, using whatever information you’ve gleaned so far about the target’s location. Roll the attack normally (taking the –5 penalty for attacking a creature that has total concealment). If you pick the ...


5

The sleeping opponent is considered a helpless defender and thus 0 Dex, receives no dex bonuses and is -5 to flatfooted AC. Does the defender ALSO suffer a -4 to AC for being prone? Yes, sort of. Here's what the Helpess rule says: A helpless target is treated as having a Dexterity of 0 (-5 modifier). Melee attacks against a helpless target get a +4 ...


3

A slam attack is basically a very forceful, blunt, body attack. Picture a zombie attacking, it's not going to punch you. It's going to slowly and methodically hit you with it's arms, or headbutt. With something that moves a bit quicker, like a doppleganger, this is representative of the fact that it can attack in numerous different humanoid forms. So ...


3

To the first question. Yes, "If you're able to make multiple attacks with the Attack action, this attack replaces one of them." (PHB 195) So yes you can attack again if you grapple with your first action. You are not limited to whom you attack, so anyone in reach including the grappled opponent is fine. Your opponent is only frozen in place. That is the ...


3

It's not automatic. To hit with a magic attack, you roll as usual and apply your magic attack bonus to the roll. Your magic attack bonus is defined in § Combat, as your MIND bonus plus your level. By RAW you need to hit your target's full AC—but the whole point of Microlite20 is to define some minimal sensible rules so that you can riff off them seamlessly ...


3

The natural attack granted by the corpse creature template does give the corpse stirge an option it didn't have before: instead of using the touch attack and subsequent attach ability (which starts a grapple), it can slam folks; damage will be miniscule (1 point of damage on average). The DM may designate the new slam attack as the corpse stirge's primary ...


2

Yes A creature can always use its natural attacks on a full attack. It attacks with its primary natural attack, then attacks with any and all secondary natural attacks at a significant penalty. The Multiattack feat will reduce this penalty, but it's not necessary to make the bonus attacks to begin with.


2

The first attack does not require a Full Round action Please see the following from PFSRD: If you get more than one attack per round because your base attack bonus is high enough (see Base Attack Bonus in Classes), because you fight with two weapons or a double weapon, or for some special reason, you must use a full-round action to get your additional ...


2

Feint is just a slightly awkward name, because anyone who knows what the term means outside of the game thinks of a quick false attack to mis-direct that is almost immediately followed up with a real attack with full commitment. Very few game rules attempt to track blow-by-blow activity in combat - the necessary detail is not really there. In the game's ...


2

mxyzplk's answer is mostly correct. It can apply to all, none, or just the attacks following turning Power Attack on. To add to his answer, you can turn Power Attack on between iterative attacks. The language "You must choose to use this feat before making an attack roll" is worded so that you can't look at the die result and then determine if you want to ...


2

No. I don't think there is quite a rule that covers this. But the damage from Witch's Bolt's add on feature would be counted the same way as other kinds of no-save damage is counted (Magic Missile for example. It's not a part of the attack roll's damage roll, and thus is not doubled if you roll a critical on the original attack.


1

Combat is treated just as it would should you be on foot, you would make a ride check to guide the mount as a free action and then make an attack at the end of your charge. If you are using a Lance you would double your damage at the end of the charge. I have included a bunch of text that, for the most part, is relevant below: Mounted Combat With a DC 5 ...


1

To grapple someone, you need a hand dedicated to it. Otherwise, there aren't any restrictions about attacks. Yes, you can Attack them. Yes, they can Attack you or someone else nearby. Think of it like you grabbed them by the shoulder. They can't move away unless they can shake you off, but otherwise they can act normally. Advantage / disadvantage doesn't ...



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