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16

Making a living in the RPG industry really depends on your definition of making a living. I think there is a lot of potential to make money, but it will likely require a lot of work for not much of an income compared to more lucrative careers that take a great deal of effort. When I think of what you've asked, I think of individuals like Jason Calacanis or ...


7

There are some examples of novels/series where this has been done in this question, so this is definitely not outside of the realm of possibilities. As to your specific points: One of the downfalls of most fantasy novels isn't the fact that they are genre fiction, but because of the fact that the writing is pretty bad. Though collaboration is quite ...


6

Beyond working as a writer, publisher, or artist, consider child care. I heard of at least one mom paying DMs for educational roleplaying with her kid. See Roleplaying games as a teaching tool. I also heard of a woman running a businness selling roleplaying for a summer program. See Abantey, the Roleplay Workshop. I also heard of at least one person who ...


5

I have a friend who is a professional roleplayer. He is hired by companies to help assess potential employees and train existing ones by taking on various job-related roles - the irate customer, the uncommunicative co-worker, the shy patient, whatever is called for. his background is in acting and he does OK. If your friend has the necessary skills and ...


5

Do you have the time to write for at least one hours a day, every day? Do you have the drive to throw away all that you did and start over? Do you have the self confidence to be told "this is shit", re-write it just to be told "it's still shit" and re-write it again -- repeat this loop many times? Are you happy waiting many years and get hundreds of ...


3

I'm not sure if these qualify, but here are a few examples: -Rob Kuntz of Pied Piper Publishing has publishing modules such as the Living Room based on his Game Master experiences from the early days of Dungeons and Dragons. -The hit anime/novels Records of Lodoss War actual began as an actual play recounting of a RPG session in Japan. -Ed Greenwood ...


2

You become a writer for tabletop RPGs by: doing it whenever you can; write a log, write for fanzines like Fight On!, write adventures or classes or other material and make them freely available looking out for open calls for freelancers, sending queries to magazines like Kobold Quarterly, watching the Wizards of the Coast job boards for jobs in design (I ...


2

Practically speaking, it's a service job, but it's a tricky one. Let's say you've got five players on average, and a game session lasts four hours. Your hourly rate ought to be at least $15 an hour, so you're looking for $60, or $12 from each of them. OK. How does that compare to how much people currently pay to game? A convention slot will run somewhere ...


2

I had one long campaign after which on of the players and I considered doing this, but going back and bowdlerizing all the IP was a showstopper; it was obviously D&D/Greyhawk/Night Below and other adventures. Firstly, forget having everyone write a part and stitch it together - at least not if you want it to be a real, publishable-quality novel, unless ...


1

All the advice previously here is great advice.. and should be heeded. I have tried several times. Novel writing is VERY different from writing encounters/plots or even settings. My players constantly tell me i should publish... but thats a whole level of commitment (as noted previously by others) that most people do not seem to have. My advice is to write ...



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