New answers tagged

1

The Creating New Races rules are quite comprehensive and I think trouble in trying to value something like being able to summon a weapon is expecting an ability to appear almost exactly like that as a Racial Trait. What you describe sounds more like a spell which you can have as a Racial Trait, I'll point you to the Magical Racial Trait, Standard "Spell-Like ...


4

Playtesting. I know it's somewhat of an unsatisfying answer, but it's the truth. It's what all of the professionals do when they make a new class or race or what have you. The rest of my answer is taken from paid game developer's answers at conventions I've attended (with some of my own experience). It's good that you have data from an external system ...


5

This feat seems unnecessary. Massive Grip in conjunction with a Great Weapon would allow a character to do extra damage by taking a penalty (disadvantage) on an attack. There is already a feat that fulfills this role: Great Weapon Master. Great Weapon Master is also balanced in ways that Massive Grip isn't: The -5 attack penalty is cumulative with other ...


0

As described this MAY be balanced for increasing a 2d6 weapon to 4d6 Methodology Since you need to take a particular feat to use these new massive weapons I think it's fair to compare this balance-wise to other feats. To keep things simple I'm only looking at damage potential here; in play I would expect massive weapons to have RP effects that may be good ...


16

It isn't overpowered, but it is strong. For example, it allows a Monk to make 3 attacks per round at level 1, or 4 if they are willing to spend a ki point. It's also better damage than any other weapon, as it works out to be (5 + Str * 2) on average vs (7 + Str) for a greatsword. It's also great for any character that wants to make as many attacks as ...


1

It completely depends on the circumstance and the setting. Assuming this "Claw" attack is a modified "Unarmed Attack" action, I would personally say that using two weapons (Handaxes, Scimitar or Shortswords) would be more effective. Especially since some classes grant you access to these weapons off the bat. Plus, a lot of martial weapons average out at 6.5 ...


8

This would probably be a little too powerful, for the cost of a feat (Armor Proficiency: Chainmail) it would grant classes that normally use Leather or Hide armor a +4 - +8 to AC (depending on level), most feats that boost AC seems to usually only give a +1 or +2. In general classes that use light armor are able to have an adequate AC with some combination ...


8

This is an attempt to describe where linear vs quadratic comes from, not talk about the power level differences between fighters and wizards in general. Fighters gain HP as they gain level. It takes (very) roughly as many rounds for a Fighter to kill a Fighter at level 1 as at level 20. The Fighter's damage output goes up linearly against an expected ...


5

This concept has been around since the early days and modern RPGs (for example, 3.5e) are less susceptible to this problem. In AD&D, wizards started off with 1d4hp, a weak attack and not much in the way of spells. Magic missile was barely as good as an average warrior's attack. They couldn't use any of the cool weapons or wear any of the good armors. ...


41

Strictly speaking, it’s not actually true The terms “linear” and “quadratic” come from mathematics. Linear growth is one in which the rate of change is constant. Notably, this means that no one level can be particularly special, each level would involve the same bonuses as the one before it, and growth only happens because of the accumulation. For ...


28

Three reasons, in order of increasing importance: flexibility, narrative agency, and expectations. Flexibility: A well-built fighter can compete with a wizard in pretty much any combat-specific area. Wizards can be very good at grappling, so can fighters. Wizards can deal very large amounts of damage, so can fighters. Wizards can be good at ranged ...


61

Breadth of Option Unexpected monster rears out of the darkness, clearly well beyond the battered party's ability to handle? Wizard teleports home. Fighter manages to kill the thing half to death before he gets eaten. Ambuscade! The earl's men have the party cornered, and demand they surrender - only execution awaits if they do. Wizard casts ...


15

D&D creatures may have evasion abilities such as flying, invisibility, damage reduction, darkness, illusions, ensnarement, walls, and teleportation. Spellcasters have spells which can defeat monsters that have these evasion abilities, and they have spells which can give themselves these evasion abilities. Fighters don't have any intrinsic way to deal ...



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