New answers tagged

10

The DMG says the following (p. 241) IGNORING INSPIRATION Inspiration might not work for your campaign. Some DMs feel it adds a layer of metagame thinking, and others feel that heroism, roleplaying, and other parts of the game are their own rewards that don't need incentives like inspiration. If you choose to ignore inspiration, you're telling the ...


7

As per Inspiration on p240-241 of the DMG: Awarding inspiration is an effective way to encourage roleplaying and risk-taking... think of inspiration as a spice that you can use to enhance your campaign. Some DMs forgo using inspiration, while others use it as a key part of the game. All text relating to Inspiration in the rulebooks indicates that it is ...


2

Give it a half-life After a few weeks/months Dense Iron degrades into regular iron or even "light iron" and loses it's awesome or magical properties. Or maybe falls apart completely. It's going to be hard to keep a steady supply of Dense Iron Warhammers for one person much less an army.


0

Figure a way to counter the alloy This is probably a variation on IanDrash's answer but perhaps your PCs can discover a way to disable the properties of the alloy. Perhaps they discover a substance that causes that specific alloy to become brittle. The game's rules will inevitably change. Instead of being a race to arm your kingdom it becomes a race to ...


1

I'd raise the question of specificity -- if the caster points "up in the air" while outside, where is he actually pointing? Could be any position from just above his hand to that 300 foot limit (or well beyond, causing the spell to fail). Much more useful to precipitate the victim into the Astral Plane. That said, if you have a single creature to deal ...


6

In 5e, spells which deal damage require an Attack roll or a Saving throw. The lack of a Saving throw makes this spell OP at 5th level. If you add the Saving throw, the damage that you can deal by teleporting an enemy 300 ft into the air seems balanced to me. Compare for example with the 10d6+40 damage for Disintegration (level 6) or the 8d8 damage to ...


10

Short answer: Dexterity is too powerful while Wisdom and Charisma are more difficult to justify changing. You can homebrew them just as you can homebrew anything, but you might be violating balance concerns for Dexterity if you do. Okay, I admit that wasn't very short, but it is a complex answer. I'll try to tackle them more in-depth now. First, why aren'...


13

Fifth Edition emphazises the role of the DM as an arbiter but also as a game designer. This quote from the DMG explains why the list of magic items shouldn't be seen as exhaustive (p. 284, emphasis mine): Creating a Magic Item The magic items in chapter 7, “Treasure,” are but a few of the magic treasures that characters can discover during their ...


8

I see three possibilities: Either you change the world (and with it the campaign), change the enemies or you make the ore something more. Change the ore: Liesmith gave a very nice possible answer, so I'll just put in a few extra possibilities. For example: What makes this ore special? How is it so powerful? Maybe it is stabilised by God #1. Maybe it feeds ...


6

Given the extent of the lore that we know: The alloy was gifted by a god (let's call him Loki) to his followers, then the recipe was "leaked" to a kingdom (let's call it the Kingdom of Loathing), which hates the worship of gods, by Loki's enemy (let's call him Thor). My suggestion is to keep the physical properties of the alloy the same, but reveal a ...


-1

True polymorph is strong due to the fact that it can quadruple a player's power (CR 20 = 4 lvl 20's), yet it is balanced for the most part by the GM's ruling. For all intents and purposes the target has been replaced by a new creature. That's it. Plain and simple. "The target's game statistics...are replaced by the statistics of the new form." That's ...


1

"Goblin dice" describes your "less robust equilibrium" -- situations in which the randomness of dice rolls dominate over other factors such as strategy or story.


7

I think the most apt term is "power creep". It describes an escalation of powers, which have crept up on the designer and/or GM. It's a parallel situation to games (RPGs or card games or computer games or anything) where new better stuff is added, which leads to more things being added, which overpowers the original design. Quite similar to the GM whose ...


0

I think Bloat is the most appropriate word to use in this case. Where items are making either: HP Bloat : too much Health for damage done. DPS Bloat : too little Health for damage done.


31

Glass Cannon refers to characters built this way (usually deliberately) - extremely powerful offense, but very fragile defense in comparison. While they can deal exceptional amounts of damage and take out enemies in only a few hits, even normal enemies can do the same thing to them. Wizard archetypes often fall into this ideology. Power Creep refers to a ...


22

Rocket tag seems to fit this, and is often seen when talking about games with this kind of issues (Pathfinder, Exalted, WoD, etc). When both sides are made up of squishy characters and have extremely powerful guns, you have a case of Rocket Tag Gameplay. [...] The reasons for this are usually straightforward; attacks do about as much damage as you have ...


0

This is like a wizard's familiar Some spellcasters can have familiars (see the spell Find Familiar, PH p. 240) that function a bit like the faerie you are describing. Using the Find Familiar rules could provide a good starting place to help ensure the character combo would be play-balanced. Shared stats roughly equals "worn or carried item" You mention ...


-3

A Monk can hold a dagger in his hand it dose not mean he will hit you with it all his/her attacks could be made with the other hand or a foot (kick, circle kick, snap kick...ect) but he would have the dagger in his hand and giving him/her the finesse weapon so he/she could use the defense duelist or you could just say his/her hands/feet do count as finesse ...


5

For posterity's sake, the tier system discussed is this one. To summarize: tier 1 breaks the campaign every which way, tier 2 breaks the campaign in one way per character, tier 3 is always relevant, tier 4 is relevant at one thing, tier 5 isn't relevant even at their one thing, and tier 6 doesn't even get their own thing. Cutoff for Tier 1 The cutoff for ...


6

The typical approach that I have used and played under is this: Tier-4 classes can gestalt with tier-5 classes Tier-3 classes can gestalt with tier-6 classes (i.e. non-adept NPC classes) Tier-2 and tier-1 classes cannot gestalt It’s not perfect, but it seems to work pretty well. The higher-tier classes are still more powerful, even with these benefits, ...



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