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37

I think the best advice comes from Burning Wheel... A failed roll doesn't mean a failure to perform, merely a failure to perform well enough. A failed drive in that example chase should be merely that he opened up the range. Only a fumble should be a crash. In your opposed drive rolls, it should be: Both make, range stays the same Both fail, range ...


19

BRP is "deadly" mostly because the damage capacity is relatively low (Size+Con)/2, averaging 11 points, and damages are a significant portion of that. Weapons range from 1d4 (dagger) through 2d8 (Greatsword) damage, before accounting for damage by location limits and impaling... and head hits can only take 1/3 the total. Quite simply put, a single hit in the ...


15

Yes, these GMs are undoubtedly doing it wrong, as others have said. But if you want more predictability and less failure, just roll percentiles but allow the player to choose which die to take as tens, and which as units. This would give your character with 60% Drive only a 16% chance of failure or thereabouts. A relative beginner with 30% skill would ...


14

I'm the author of BRP Classic Fantasy and I am in the middle of running Against the Giants converted to BRP. In an effort test the system to the fullest, I'm not changing the module at all. My players just did the battle with the 22 hill giants, 3 stone giants, 1 cloud giant, 8 ogres, and a cave bear and they only came close to losing a single character. ...


10

Basic Mechanics The mechanical difference of these systems is spelled out in the first paragraphs of each in the BRP core book. Magic is on page 89 and Sorcery is on page 122. In a very generalized nutshell, Magic represents characters being able to learn the very basics of how spell casting works in general, and that knowledge enables them to learn ...


8

No, this is not an inherent trait of d% systems, but a result of the exact mechanics. BRP is descended from RuneQuest, which was designed to be more realistic than D&D: Thus, characters only have a few hit points. It has also been used for games such as the Call of Cthulhu, which value players being unable to always fight their way out of situations. ...


8

I'm pretty much only familiar with BRP through Call of Cthulhu, and I don't actually own a copy of The Laundry yet, but I'll give a quick run-down of what I've been able to dig up. Charisma stat replaces Appearance No Magic Points Personality Type is selected during character creation, adding an additional 20 skill points which are distributed between ...


6

Paranoia is the highest lethality game that I know of: dying and activating your next clone is one of its tropes, critically failing a single roll is likely to get you killed, and dying multiple times in a single session is common. It's a d20, roll-under system, not percentile.


6

This is basically why systems like GURPS go for randomization mechanics that approximate a normal distribution. You could mimic GURPS and rescale the skill numbers from the 1-100 scale to 3-18, and then roll 3d6 against them. Or perhaps it might be interesting to try keeping the skill numbers the same and rolling 5d20 instead of d100. (Super bonus points ...


5

The base skill in Speak Own Language is 30%. That doesn't mean that you fail to come up with words to say what you want to say 70% of the time in routine conversation (though there is a special mechanic here, see below). Instead, a 30% skill means that you are competent but unarticulate in conversation, and will perform better in conversation than most ...


5

I run into this issue all the time with GURPS. The basic assumptions of GURPS/BRP rules are different than that of the AD&D rules. Unless you are allowing the equivalent of superpowers there is no time that a GURPS/BRP is worth four "normal" characters like a 4th level D&D fighter. So are two routes you can take. First you can have BRP (or GURPS) ...


4

I don't know if you'll interpret this as "GM advice", but it sounds like the people you've played with have come up with their own interpretations of the rules, or followed some wrong-headed advice themselves. The general rule of rolling skills in Call of Cthulhu is, don't, unless you need to. A broad spectrum of actions is covered under the "Automatic ...


4

The old FASA Star Trek had a list of things that didn't need rolls. at 20-30, one could, without rolling, perform all routine duties.


4

The BRP gold book is a good general start, and will provide the core of what you need, I personally find the percentile approach nice and easy to change to what I need across the various games. Personally I'm not a fan of Strike Force 7 and it's overt caricature, but from my little experience of the supplement it provides plenty of content if that's what ...


2

I just ran two players through the beginning of B10 with 4 PCs total. They had no problem taking out goblins with a 30-35% chance to hit, and hobgoblins with a 50% chance to hit. They could romp on groups of four to seven opponents of lesser weapon skills. We will see how they perform against werewolves and dire wolves, but a quick, accurate arrow brought ...


2

Roll thrice, take the median (i.e. middle value). Reduces variance, but keeps the mean and the range fixed, and does not involve too much extra rolling. For stronger effect, roll five, 7, or some other odd number of dice and take the median.


2

60% driving..... think what that means. It obviously doesn't mean you can only drive 60% of the time. It might mean you're 40% 'better' than a driver who only has a 20% skill, or it might mean you're 60% able to fulfill those really critical tasks that crop up in emergency or stressful situations. Firstly, I would add % values to tasks based on their ...


2

The skill ratings on BRP are meant for when the character is acting under pressure, either in a stressful situation like combat, or under a strict deadline. If the character has plenty of time to resolve a task, or the task itself is trivial, the skill rating should be doubled (this is called an Easy skill roll on the BRP rule book). That way, characters ...


2

On BRP central, there is a nice 'wild dice' idea. Each session, each player gets 5 additional percentage dice. If they roll a fail and really want to succeed, they can roll one of their wild die and replace the previous roll. E.g. Player rolls 72, a fail. they roll one of their wild % dice, get 30 and replace the 70 to give a 32 score. The player can ...


2

The Riddle of Steel by Jacob Norwood and Driftwood Publishing. May be out of print currently. The game is inspired by the Conan stories, and the system is intended to emulate medieval combat plus wicked awesome sorcery. Supposedly the guys who designed the game actually know how to use swords and armor and based its combat system around this knowledge. ...


1

A system that I have found to have a high mortality rate (pending certain basics) is L5R. Thanks to the fact that it works with a "Hit Point" type health system, and the "exploding dice" mechanic (it's a d10 system, where if a 10 is rolled, another die is added to that die's total until it stops rolling tens) lends towards no upper limit of damage other ...


1

I think part of the problem is that you're taking any failure in a disastrous way, when my understanding of the BRP rules is that above your skill is only a failure, while a 100 is a dipterous failure. However, as you "Don't want" GM advice (Even though this is a very simple fix); Success tracks. Don't make everything hinge on one roll. Take combat for ...


1

Get rid of the dice and use a computer to pick a random number from a Normal distribution. Pick what you consider to be the mean skill for a professional. Something around 30 or 40 I would say with a sensible variance depending on how extreme you want the results. It could maybe be linked to stress/sanity. Alternatively, the variance/mean could be linked ...


1

As GM, I'd only ever ask someone to make a roll on something if success or failure matter, or make things more interesting. Also, as stated before, "failure" does not mean "catastrophe". A failed Driving roll might mean "catastrophe" if you're attempting an action which could result in such -- trying to outrun a train at the crossing. But that failed ...


1

Yeah, you'll need to make pretty sweeping changes to the number of giants - or change things to be a more "sneak" kind of mission. I remember that hall with like 20 giants in it... Not going to happen in BRP. Of course if you go with the BRP 'realism' vibe, far fewer giants can survive per square mile, so a really small clan of them is about it. But in ...



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