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58

How do the Kobolds remember which parts are trapped? Basically, this answer is about weaving the Kobold's own marking system into the narrative. It does assume you draw your own maps and don't use Dungeon Tiles or anything. Obtain 6 or so pretty looking symbols (they don't need to have meaning, but if they look Draconic it's bonus awesome) Mark every ...


37

Aside from being unwieldly, prone to soda spills, sudden gusts of wind and players taking a peek…? :-) Personal opinion: As nice as professionally-printed dungeon maps might be, personally I much prefer sketching the current part of the dungeon on scratch paper as the players advance. This has several advantages: it is clear to everyone that my sketch ...


22

Distance in squares and other actions: Did a spellcaster ever miscast a spell as he suddenly realized that the target was out of range? Did a fighter ever charge and notice that he could not reach the opponent, wasting his action? Did an archer ever shoot an arrow to notice that it could not reach the target? If you answered three times with no I think ...


17

4th Edition, from experience When inflicted on a 4e group as part of a curse, it gave everyone a headache and made combats incredibly long. The hex based map presents incredible difficulties in calculating zones relative to the ease of calculating zones in a square map. Either zones in a hex grid are the same area as a square grid or they are the same ...


16

You can draw on stained areas with a non-permanent marker then try to remove it. Once I had written on my friend's gaming mat with a permanent marker by mistake. We couldn't remove it no matter what. After a week, while drawing with a non-permanent marker on the stain that left from permanent one, I discovered that permanent marks can be dissolved once it ...


16

S scale models will fit best on a standard 1-inch grid, and with your heroic scale 25mm miniatures. With a 1-inch grid, where each 1-inch square represents a 5-foot square, you are playing at a 1:60 ratio (where 1 real-life inch represents 60 in-game inches.) Your closest model railroad scales are: (source) S scale (aka 3/16" scale) at 1:64, or ≈7% ...


16

Nothing special happens by RAW There are no official rules describing being on or off a map in 4E. Squares, and what might be in them, are defined as game elements, but maps are not. Technically, DMs that allow movement off map that looks like it should work (e.g. continuing along a forest path) are playing by RAW. If you can move to a location, and it ...


15

These are on two different scales. Generally it does not matter where a Player Character is on board a ship in ship to ship combat. Treat each ship as a figure until they are at boarding action, then the exact location matter and change scale. That is, for ship to ship combats have a Sea Map with Ships on it. Once the ships are in contact, change to two ship ...


15

Wizards.com itself has a massive collection. Finding exactly what you need can be tedious, but for sheer volume it's hard to beat the wizards.com galleries and archives. The Art & Map Gallery and the Map-A-Week Archive are both free, and give access to most of the maps published in D&D 3.5 physical volumes and adventures (though not the content ...


15

This answer basically trades significant amounts of out-of-game prep-time in order to save in-game play-time. For a variety of reasons (but mostly because it’s horribly tedious), I have only used it a few times. The idea is to mark traps on the grid, and then cut up post-it notes and cover the markings. Have to make sure you have sufficiently-opaque post-it ...


14

There are no rules for this. That's okay though, as rules for this won't solve your problem anyway, and you need to approach this differently: The event that inspired this question is an example of social contract conflict or friction—some groups are OK with reifying game abstractions, and others aren't. Your GM isn't, and your wizard-player is. To solve ...


13

Draw lines through corners. None of your examples seem correct to me. While almost everyone uses area templates, the rules specify that you have to draw lines out from the chosen center point until you hit an obstruction or reach the limit of the effect’s radius. These are known as lines of effect, and are actual, geometrical, 1-dimensional lines, not ...


12

Roll20 is another option you should consider. It runs in the browser, allows you to upload images to be used as tokens/maps from your PC and provides a number of other features that sound suited to what you want.


12

You can make your own with paper easily. Take a standard sheet of paper and put the grid on it manually. Graph paper will make this step easier. Once you have one page with the proper gridlines, photocopy as many as you need for your mat (I'd estimate somewhere around 15 or 20). Match the gridlines up and tape the pages together. Now get some clear ...


12

Here's something I've done for fantasy games. I've never tried it in modern, but it should still carry over. Give the bad guys terrain they can use to their advantage. When I was running D&D 4e, my favourite thing about it was the monsters. They were balanced pretty well. Each one had an XP value. For a fair fight, you took set amount of XP and ...


12

As SevenSidedDie says, there are no rules for this, so you(r DM) needs to make a ruling one way or the other. Personally, if I was the DM on the spot, I'd probably rule that: Yes, the characters can totally call out "invisible goblin on my 2 o'clock, distance 30 feet!" and be understood. If necessary, they can also use their finger to point. No, I'm not ...


11

The d20 SRD has a simple and useful section on using hexes instead of squares. In terms of ramifications it has this to say: Using a hex-based grid changes relatively little about the game, but poses a mapping dilemma for the GM. Most buildings and dungeons are based on 90-degree and 45-degree corners, so superimposing a hex-based grid on a structure ...


11

Not that I can think of. Cover-the-dungeon-and-reveal is one good method of revealing floor plans gradually, and works perfectly well (assuming your table is large enough for the full map). There is a minor possible issue: crumpled tissue paper is light and easily knocked around during play. This depends on your table, weight of paper and players, so it's ...


11

I did something like this for a specific large passage in a dungeon in my game, the solution that worked well for me was to have trap placement dictated by a hidden pattern At first it might seem like this would be too obvious, but you'd be surprised how difficult it is to work out a pattern when you don't even know if there is a pattern in the first place, ...


10

Option 1: Reference Speed This is the quick and dirty approach (and the one I've used most). Effectively, you move the map at the same speed as one of the things on the map. That thing doesn't move, everything else moves around it. For example, a ship moving north at 30 squares/turn, chasing another ship moving north at 25 squares/turn. The faster ship ...


10

Typically in any roleplaying game whatsoever, if the action moves off the map (a Out Of Character construct to help players visualize the area), you add more to the map, either re-drawing it to show the new area or getting out a bunch more graph paper. Unless of course there is a terrain feature in the way (like a wall, or a ravine), in which case you ...


9

Cartographer's Guild has a wide selection of maps, some of which are gridded for tabletop gaming. Paratime Design released 100 Creative Commons licensed, black and white dungeon maps in the style of old D&D.


9

Savage Worlds Deluxe edition is designed to be played with miniatures and battle map. Using Miniatures The rules are written for the table-top because that requires exact measurements and precise rules. That’s why all the weapon ranges and movement values are listed in inches (rather than yards or some other unit). Using miniatures and ...


9

There are numerous products available for sale that provide an erasable surface that has a pre-printed 1" grid on it. Here's one a lot of folks use. Chessex Battlemat. Comes in several sizes, but it's pretty expensive and if you use certain markers on it, they won't come off. You can also buy a large white board and draw a 1" grid in wet erase or ...


9

A megadungeon is simply too large to feasibly represent during play at 1in=5ft scale, even if you were wanting to, without a lot of work. I find that drawing out every section either beforehand or during play in battle-map scale is a lot of work for very little value. It's more effective to save miniature-scale maps for where they are most effective. So ...


8

This might be a digression but there's always the option of using neither of them. A tape ruler and some wargaming templates (warhammer or warmahordes) and you're good to go. Replace squares/hexes with inches and you have a pin point accurate system. Takes a little getting used to at first but it works smoothly once you get going. For the GM, maps suddenly ...


8

Make your own using a variety of options. Kittrich Corporation Con-Tac® brand It's almost always 18" or 27" wide. checkerboards/White 922300 Blue /White 9P2300 Black/White 921300 Yellow/White hex-grid equivalents 961300 Marigolds on White Clear Use for covering some other option… 9993 (18"x9') 999800 (18"x24') Note also: Kittrich used to make, and ...


8

Pat and Scott both have excellent answers. Here are some other things to think about. First there is this link where a guy goes step by step through building a digital game table with the projector mounted from below. Remember you can project from above or BELOW. In either case you need to figure out how far your projector needs to be from the surface to ...


8

I use to draw maps on the fly, as the players explore or get into a situation. I must say that those maps aren't generally very detailed, so the task is done fast and it doesn't slow too much the game. The only advices that I can give if you draw more detailed maps are: Try to know beforehand the next possible rooms, and have them ready so you can draw ...


8

I've never used Crayola Washable markers on a battlemat so I haven't had to deal with this personally, but I have a kid so I'm familiar with a particular resource you might find useful – Crayola has a FAQ of tips for cleaning their products off of materials they weren't meant to be used on. The closest I could find for this situation is for Crayola Washable ...



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