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6

For what it's worth, there are isometric tilesets available for Roll20. A search for "isometric" on the Roll20 Marketplace turns up several results, including Isometric 3D Desert Tomb, Isometric Sewer, and Isometric Dungeon (by Plexsoup; I am not affiliated). The description pages for Plexsoup's isometric sets also includes instructions for creating a ...


3

So, the best way to interpret this is to go back to the 3.5 version of D&D. In 4th Edition, there were no circular spell effects. Everything was a square to make things simple for the players and DM. Fifth Edition is going back to the earlier style of play where circles are more common, but on a grid, a circle isn't a circle at all (and they are not like ...


2

Tabletop Simulator is full 3d and allows you pick up and move anything, but it'll make your game look very much like an actual tabletop-game and I'm not sure that's the style you're aiming for. It's also not really designed specifically for RPG games, but I figured I'd at least give you the option to check for yourself.


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How about the aptly named 3D Virtual Tabletop? It's currently available on iPad, iPhone and Android. You can import your own maps and minis from images on your device. A web browser version for Mac and PC is in the works.


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The PHB does not set out any mechanism for determining which squares are affected by a circular spell. However, based on vanilla movement rules, circles are square. Consider the grid movement box in the PHB (p 192): To enter a square, you must have at least 1 square of movement left, even if the square is diagonally adjacent to the square you're in. (The ...


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Not that I'm aware of, although I did see a video of a guy using the unreal engine that looked interesting. Something like panda 3d also has potential for a 3d game board. I also saw an isometric map from torstan used with maptool, but it was technically 2d, just with an isometric view. Edit: After some thought; I wasn't really following your 2.5d ...


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As the basis of a house rule, we found this math and diagram my druid-player drew up helpful to accurately figure out square coverage. (As I noted in a comment in Marty Walser's answer, some of the shapes in the the template he provided aren't mathematically correct, although neither is moving diagonally through a grid for the same distance). Click for a ...



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