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22

Distance in squares and other actions: Did a spellcaster ever miscast a spell as he suddenly realized that the target was out of range? Did a fighter ever charge and notice that he could not reach the opponent, wasting his action? Did an archer ever shoot an arrow to notice that it could not reach the target? If you answered three times with no I think ...


14

There are no rules for this. That's okay though, as rules for this won't solve your problem anyway, and you need to approach this differently: The event that inspired this question is an example of social contract conflict or friction—some groups are OK with reifying game abstractions, and others aren't. Your GM isn't, and your wizard-player is. To solve ...


12

As SevenSidedDie says, there are no rules for this, so you(r DM) needs to make a ruling one way or the other. Personally, if I was the DM on the spot, I'd probably rule that: Yes, the characters can totally call out "invisible goblin on my 2 o'clock, distance 30 feet!" and be understood. If necessary, they can also use their finger to point. No, I'm not ...


7

For what it's worth, there are isometric tilesets available for Roll20. A search for "isometric" on the Roll20 Marketplace turns up several results, including Isometric 3D Desert Tomb, Isometric Sewer, and Isometric Dungeon (by Plexsoup; I am not affiliated). The description pages for Plexsoup's isometric sets also includes instructions for creating a ...


7

I've had the same issue last year and did some days of Googling to find out what I needed. Even though I didn't need those tools for the same purposes, I'm pretty much sure you'll find them useful. Solution 1: RP Tools Since you asked for a Windows application, these should fit the most. They're actually five applications that stack with each other. You ...


4

I print off custom maps from map creators, then lay an acrylic sheet over top. The hard surface is easier to place minis on and you can use dry-erase markers to augment the map with traps, AoE effects, etc. To add Fog of War to this setup, I use butcher paper in between the map and the acrylic then slid it out as the players progress. I have also used ...


4

We usually draw dungeons onto a large battle map prior to the session. While it gives away a bit ahead of time, I always found it comparable to have a map of the city (or hiking trail) you visit - it's one thing that you know there is a large round place with a church building around the next corner and a completely other thing to end up on St. Peters Square ...


4

Unlike prior efforts from Wizards of the Coast, Legacy of the Crystal Shard provides no battlemaps, or even any indication of the layout of areas where combats are likely to take place. So, use whatever maps you feel are appropriate to the situation, including drawing your own. When I ran it, I simply borrowed some other maps I had that seemed roughly ...


4

There's basically two factors you want to make sure to hit upon. Consequential Terrain As you mentioned, the terrain you include doesn't actually influence the combats on the basis of the power levels involved. You should think about what kinds of things DO work at that level. Lava? Alien superstructures that can't be blasted through? Etc. That's just ...


4

"Terrain is often of more value than bravery." — Flavius Vegetius Renatus, De re militari Just because your players are failing to make use of the terrain around them, doesn't mean their enemies won't The NPC enemies that your players face should me making heavy use and advantage of powerful terrain features to their advantage. They should be getting a ...


3

So, the best way to interpret this is to go back to the 3.5 version of D&D. In 4th Edition, there were no circular spell effects. Everything was a square to make things simple for the players and DM. Fifth Edition is going back to the earlier style of play where circles are more common, but on a grid, a circle isn't a circle at all (and they are not like ...


2

In our campaigns we use http://combatmanager.com/ and have made very good experiences. Anyway, it is more of a tracker and it didn't contain a combat map which we didn't need because we use a real world map.


2

I have a very old battlemat that I just took out of storage. It sat for years with marker on the mat and some baby-wipes cleaned up almost all of the marker residue. I can't say for sure what types of markers were used but the mat was last used about TEN years ago. The ink was almost instantly removed. First it smeared but then the smears cleaned right ...


2

I had a similar issue, I accidentally used dry erase markers and the stains remained on my mat for a month or so because nothing worked to get them out. I had a desperate idea so I dabbed the lines with a bit of nail polish remover and then used a regular rubber eraser on the line. It worked, there are a few marks here and there that just wont come out but ...


2

I've created lots of custom battle mats over the years. The best method I have found to do this quickly, cheaply, and easily while still ending up with a durable and resilient mat is outlined in this YouTube video. This method is nice because it does not require cutting, pasting, adhesives, or lamination. The basic idea is that you purchase a poster frame ...


2

I use sheets of acrylic over top of paper maps and use butcher paper as 'fog of war' - I simply pull the butcher paper out as the PC's move forward. I place anti-slip cupboard liner under the maps so they don't slide too. Works like a charm. The acrylic sheets are handy when you use dry-erase markers on top, too.


2

Tabletop Simulator is full 3d and allows you pick up and move anything, but it'll make your game look very much like an actual tabletop-game and I'm not sure that's the style you're aiming for. It's also not really designed specifically for RPG games, but I figured I'd at least give you the option to check for yourself.


2

I do a generous amount of custom map creation for my campaign. I find that having a mixture of digital and tangible map resources is quite useful. I do not have any resources specifically sized for A1 or A0 paper; however, many digital maps can be divided up using a tool like Gimp and pasted into a document for printing. I'll confess this is time-consuming, ...


2

How about the aptly named 3D Virtual Tabletop? It's currently available on iPad, iPhone and Android. You can import your own maps and minis from images on your device. A web browser version for Mac and PC is in the works.


1

I've played the majority of my tabletop games online over the years. Therefore it's easy to use a site like Roll20, which offers a built-in Fog of War option. I personally don't really see an issue with using something like this in a live session, but typically I just don't draw maps at a face-to-face session unless the players have rolled initiative or it's ...


1

The way I've done this in the past has been drawing the map progressively, you don't need to be a good drawer. You just draw in lines for walls, and doors etc. You can get a cheap whiteboard from any number of shops along with some dry-wipe markers (or just laminate some sheets of paper). Use that for the game board with a grid across it for scale/size and ...


1

In 4th edition it was important to have an accurate map as you had all those abilities that moved players around the battlefield, so knowing exactly where a creature or player is was very important. In 5th edition they have moved away from having to have a map to it being an optional extra if you would like one. Pretty much any map type will work, as there ...


1

As a master i faced this problem since the beginning: i always like to include some sort of exploration in my adventure, and wide fighting areas, resulting in big maps. The best and practical way i use to deal with it is to draw the map while the characters see the actual part of it, but dividing the map in "drawing zones". When the characters step in ...


1

Not that I'm aware of, although I did see a video of a guy using the unreal engine that looked interesting. Something like panda 3d also has potential for a 3d game board. I also saw an isometric map from torstan used with maptool, but it was technically 2d, just with an isometric view. Edit: After some thought; I wasn't really following your 2.5d ...


1

As the basis of a house rule, we found this math and diagram my druid-player drew up helpful to accurately figure out square coverage. (As I noted in a comment in Marty Walser's answer, some of the shapes in the the template he provided aren't mathematically correct, although neither is moving diagonally through a grid for the same distance). Click for a ...


1

The PHB does not set out any mechanism for determining which squares are affected by a circular spell. However, based on vanilla movement rules, circles are square. Consider the grid movement box in the PHB (p 192): To enter a square, you must have at least 1 square of movement left, even if the square is diagonally adjacent to the square you're in. (The ...


1

We used paper to cover the parts of the dungeon that haven't been explored yet, then pulled them off as we entered the room. I recommend cardstock rather then paper, as I've found paper shifts too easily.


1

In my DM kit I have several 8" x 10" pieces of black felt (purchased at the local hobby store) that I use to cover the parts of the map. I can then reveal the map as players open doors.



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