Hot answers tagged

20

Typically the map/grid is optional item you can use. The map/grid is only typically used in combat situations, or in particular types of situations the DM deems that a map/grid is needed or could be of use. It allows for members of the party and in particular the DM to keep track of the creatures, where they stand in respect to one another. As keeping things ...


9

I typically use non-combat mapping to help show the relative distances between things and the players. This is typically done using a "You are here" dot for the players and simple lines for relevant features. I even use notations on the map to denote distances given the map is often "not to scale". This means that I still build for a combat, but the players ...


9

A megadungeon is simply too large to feasibly represent during play at 1in=5ft scale, even if you were wanting to, without a lot of work. I find that drawing out every section either beforehand or during play in battle-map scale is a lot of work for very little value. It's more effective to save miniature-scale maps for where they are most effective. So ...


7

One thing I do may get at the desire to have old/far past portions 'fall off' that you mentioned in your comments: I laminate 8-1/2 x 11 sheets with 1" grid printed on them and use them as "battle sheets." You can draw up many locations ahead of time and do other ones on the fly, keep them in a binder and lay them out (overlapping) as party enters new ...


7

Lego (other plastic building blocks are available). I used them when playing D&D with my brothers many years ago. We had a medieval set, which was just perfect for battles with men in armour. However, you can get the building blocks in a variety of colours, and there are plenty of modern sets. If purchasing new blocks, they can be bought by weight like ...


6

For Necromunda games we used corrugated cardboard spraypainted grey then written on with thick black marker pen. We cut slots to attach pieces to other pieces (with liberal use of bluetack and sellotape) to build towers and walkways and ramps and walls and all sorts. Part of the setup of every game was taking it in turns to grab a bit of terrain and stick it ...


5

The values on the table Space, Reach, & Threatened Area Templates are just guidelines, most creatures will follow those rules but not all of them have to. One example of a creature that completely ignores the table can be found on AP#27: Council of Thieves - What Lies in Dust, which has the Aspidochelone, a CR 17 N Colossal creature with a listed Space ...


5

Yes. For movement to work, the Players tell the DM where and how they want to move, and the DM sorts out the outcome and tells the Players the result. For combat, the Players tells the DM what actions they want to take, and the DM sorts out the outcome of their actions and decisions and tells the Players the results. Rinse and repeat. (It's great fun!)...


3

Roll20 does that really well, using only your browser. You can use character sheets of many systems, and move tokens. You can restrict access for modifying or seeing token/sheet/handout player by player (or all at once), roll dices on the chat (to prevent cheating), use a fog of war, have several map (but only one at a time is show to the players), ... The ...


2

I recommend getting Paizos "Flip-Mat." They're $14 and can be used with dry erase or wet erase. Other similar products also exist, such as Battlemat by Chessex. You can also make your own using a sheet of acrylic from the hardware store and the patience to draw a 1" grid on it (on the underside, so you can draw scenes on the other). Ask the players to state ...


2

You could use a scanner, scale it up, and print it. Or you can buy very nice digital copies from the artist Mike Schley, and print them. Go to staples or office Depot and ask about engineering prints. You should be able to get a large map printed for a few dollars.


2

So how do you balance keeping the players in the dark about the overall layout of a dungeon, while also providing maps of wherever they happen to be engaged in combat? (especially when you want to make an encounter that could bleed over into some surrounding hallways) One thing to try, have an assistant GM from the party that has access to the map. You can ...


2

I would recommend the following YouTube Channel:https://www.youtube.com/user/theDMsCraft The basics are you make your layout with cardboard, glue another layer of cardboard to mark off walls, etc. You could either use something similarly flat for other dungeon dressing, or use dedicated things to help set the mood. I have tried using the Dwarven Fortress ...


1

Playing on a grid is an optional rule Implicitly, 5e uses “Theater of the Mind” for combat: that is, tracking positions and distances only loosely and focusing on the narrative. Playing on a grid is explicitly called out as a variant rule, with clarifications for Squares, Speed, Entering a Square, Corners and Ranges: Variant: Playing on a Grid (PHB, p. ...


1

Hirst Arts moulds: Large selection of sci-fi (and fantasy) molds that are cast in plaster of Paris then glued and painted. Once cast and constructed they are quite durable. Split the walls into short segments, corners, straight sections for the best re-usability. The downside; time intensive and expense. Once you get the technique down and have a bit ...


1

Buy a game mat, Draw the map as they progress through it You can buy a vinyl or laminated play mat for a bit of money from certain websites. Plan out your dungeon layout beforehand, and as your group explores your megadungeon, draw in the features of the map as they arrive at certain places in the dungeon. This is the best way I've found to keep ...


1

Avoid the problem There are two situations: the players initiate combat; and, the enemies initiate combat. Situation 1: When the players initiate combat When the players are thinking about starting a fight they can state something like: PC: I survey the area to assess our tactical position. At that point you can draw/build/setup your combat map. ...


1

What I used to do: My battlemap was one of the old ones that we marked on with water soluble markers and had a 1" square grid superimposed on it. The players' figures were always on the map whether there was anything going on or not. When something arose that became a game scene, a quick sketch of the markers outlined where they were -- be it pub, ...


1

That's a good question. Because most of the material is copyrighted, people generally have personal libraries as it is frowned on to share other people's material. However, most of the good tile designers post there stuff all over the place, so for personal use, I doubt there's any issue, but you would need to do the trolling yourself. There's a few sites ...


1

When you say, "play by post", I assume you mean a forum-based game rather than a snail mail game, and that all players will have access to a web browser even though they may not be able to be online at the same time and may not be able to install software where they play. Given these conditions, I recommend... Google Draw It provides a good set of drawing ...


1

You can use any map software (like Maptools or Photoshop) to create the maps on your side, including token positioning, then upload the result image to an external site (like Imgur) and use the [img] tag that is allowed in most php forums. A player can post something like “I will move 1 square in the NE direction and attack the monster”, and when the DM ...


1

Quite frankly, Roll20 is as easy or hard as you like. Just drag and drop images and draw right on the tabletop if you want. Give each player a token, use a blank background and hex overlay and you are set. You can draw away. You don't need to use the sounds, dice roller, etc. It will keep your map from game to game and you can open separate maps for ...


1

I laminate 8-1/2 x 11 sheets with 1" grid printed on them and use them as "battle sheets." You can draw up many locations ahead of time and do other ones on the fly, keep them in a binder and lay them out (overlapping) as party enters new areas, then remove old ones as they recede into the background. Each sheet may only represent a small chamber, a half a ...



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