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15

S scale models will fit best on a standard 1-inch grid, and with your heroic scale 25mm miniatures. With a 1-inch grid, where each 1-inch square represents a 5-foot square, you are playing at a 1:60 ratio (where 1 real-life inch represents 60 in-game inches.) Your closest model railroad scales are: (source) S scale (aka 3/16" scale) at 1:64, or ≈7% ...


13

You can draw on stained areas with a non-permanent marker then try to remove it. Once I had written on my friend's gaming mat with a permanent marker by mistake. We couldn't remove it no matter what. After a week, while drawing with a non-permanent marker on the stain that left from permanent one, I discovered that permanent marks can be dissolved once it ...


11

Here's something I've done for fantasy games. I've never tried it in modern, but it should still carry over. Give the bad guys terrain they can use to their advantage. When I was running D&D 4e, my favourite thing about it was the monsters. They were balanced pretty well. Each one had an XP value. For a fair fight, you took set amount of XP and ...


10

Typically in any roleplaying game whatsoever, if the action moves off the map (a Out Of Character construct to help players visualize the area), you add more to the map, either re-drawing it to show the new area or getting out a bunch more graph paper. Unless of course there is a terrain feature in the way (like a wall, or a ravine), in which case you ...


9

There are numerous products available for sale that provide an erasable surface that has a pre-printed 1" grid on it. Here's one a lot of folks use. Chessex Battlemat. Comes in several sizes, but it's pretty expensive and if you use certain markers on it, they won't come off. You can also buy a large white board and draw a 1" grid in wet erase or ...


9

Savage Worlds Deluxe edition is designed to be played with miniatures and battle map. Using Miniatures The rules are written for the table-top because that requires exact measurements and precise rules. That’s why all the weapon ranges and movement values are listed in inches (rather than yards or some other unit). Using miniatures and ...


8

I use to draw maps on the fly, as the players explore or get into a situation. I must say that those maps aren't generally very detailed, so the task is done fast and it doesn't slow too much the game. The only advices that I can give if you draw more detailed maps are: Try to know beforehand the next possible rooms, and have them ready so you can draw ...


8

The line-of-sight benefits are not actually very much, if any. If you've every played wargames with model-based LOS, you're familiar with the excruciating process of eyeballing, using bits of string, and finally arguing over whether being able to draw LOS to a teeny bit of the tip of a sword sticking up above terrain counts as having LOS or not. Using real ...


7

As noted above, Mike Krahulik of Penny Arcade modeled spherical, planar combat in D&D in the Elemental Chaos part 1 and D&D in the Elemental Chaos part 2. A concern exists that LOE and AOE in Krahulik's models, as well as, prolonged combat and movement were not possible in the models documented. However, both context of Krahulik's efforts and his ...


6

One solution would be to use your map only to draw fight zones, and keep the rest of the map sketchy or abstract. While that sounds weird, it can be more immersive to wander through caves that meander, climb up and down cracks, etc.--which I find I tend to avoid when grid lines guide me to straight lines. You'll save yourself the effort of drawing areas ...


5

I draw maps on the fly, and here's a few tips Make sure the map is easily reachable for drawing - you'll probably have to forgo (or at least move) a DM screen. Speed is better than precision - since your grid lines are already on the page, don't worry if your lines exactly match. Drop rocks on any players who complain. I tend to minimalism on my drawings, ...


5

Yes, you can play on a grid effectively. A hex grid doesn't require much effort to play on. You can just treat any mention of "inches" as "hexes" instead. Playing on a square grid takes a little bit more conversion, but not much. There are a few gotchas though: For squares, you have to decide how to handle diagonal movement. The "3 inches for 2 diagonal ...


5

I've never used Crayola Washable markers on a battlemat so I haven't had to deal with this personally, but I have a kid so I'm familiar with a particular resource you might find useful – Crayola has a FAQ of tips for cleaning their products off of materials they weren't meant to be used on. The closest I could find for this situation is for Crayola Washable ...


5

Actually, combat in a modern city should be a LOT more interesting than in most fantasy settings! Thats because of the complexity of the terrain. The opponents the players are facing may have numerous types of advantages. Height - the enemies may have higher ground than the players. It may be small scale, they may attack suprisingly from the ceiling of a ...


5

In the end, the grid is just a tool to assist in representation and should not limit the actions of the participants. Limits like this are common in video games or software map aids, but that's just due to the nature of the medium. Some spells and ranged attacks can reach much farther than even the largest maps can accommodate. I've been in games where ...


4

Buy a soccer ball Add velcro ??? Profit On a more serious note, you'd need to sort out how movement would work, and possibly subdivide each patch into 5 or 6 triangles depending on the size of the pieces you're velcroing on. Additionally, you might want to prop the soccer ball up on stilts so that you could have units on the entire world.


4

I would print out a flattened geodesic sphere for the minis alongside a printed out and assembled version of the same, using post-it notes or similar to reference where the minis map to on the sphere. For movement, it's triangles instead of squares. Movement along a side is adjacent triangles. I would probably disallow movement across corners, just to make ...


4

One good solution I've found to the mega-map issue is sectional maps... each room is a separate chunk of map, laminated, and cut to outline. A little bit of scotch tape, and they stay together as needed. You can even add little details - the only hard part is keeping things organized. And that's what accordion-files are for...


3

I have played DnD (which is extremely similar to Legend when it comes to combat) both with grids and without grids. Here is some advice I hope you will find useful. As you prefer to play descriptively (i.e. without map) rather than with map, I will start there. Playing without a grid When I have improvised games far from home, I have never had a grid or ...


3

I don't think Legend can be played without a grid. Some circles require you to think in terms of squares and the whole tactical game revolves around getting into position in a way that's better not to handwave. Since from you comments I read that any cheap alternatives would definitely be helpful and worthwhile for running a game if a descriptive style ...


3

There aren't any rules for handling characters leaving the already-defined grid. It's quite reasonable for a DM to wish to keep combat on the defined grid. 4e is a game of tactical grid-based combat, and things like positioning and taking advantage of terrain features are of utmost importance. Gridless D&D 4e doesn't work very well - unless you do a ...


2

Surprised nobody has mentioned it, but a roll of Gaming Grid Paper is a great way to prepare before hand. This way you are prepared no matter which direction your players decide to go! (You can never guess what your players will do) You can make it as detailed as you like and not worry about it erasing or smudging! There are several different brands, and ...


2

What I have started doing is drawing maps on transparencies ahead of time and overlaying them as we go over my battle map. as I run out of room the unneeded can be removed as we go. For large rooms I have a few transparences taped together. Also I keep my transparencies labeled with astick-on white small dot label and a # of the room written on it. I have ...


2

The last time I played D&D, I used PosteRazor to create battle mats on 110-lb cardstock. Just crop the map sections with a paper trimmer and tape them together. This works great with the single-room encounter maps that are common in modern D&D adventures, reasonably well with whole-level maps. You may need to tweak things a little to hide map ...


2

If you are free to alter the dimensions of your planet, you can use any one of these nice projections of a sphere's surface. Note that the projections have 24 squares across and top to bottom (15 degrees lat/long each) ie. a 24x24 grid. At 5' per grid square you end up with a circumference of 120' and a 19' radius. Note that most projections lose a lot of ...


2

I skimmed my DMG and have found no explicit rules for this so it depends on a GM ruling I guess, of course the ruling should take into account the PC's opinions. Generally the grid is like a HUD GM needs to pause the game and extend the battlemap to cover the terrain which always existed there, so in my opinion the DM's who rule to add to the map are the ...


1

This is probably not as portable as a map, but we always play in the same location and we all own cars. I don't think we would have used it with the changing locations and 60min bike-travels back at school: We have a opaque plastic board the size of the table and maybe 2mm strong. You can put any kind of map under it, a hexmap, tilemap, predrawn or simply ...


1

3d movement in D&D is made by dividing the space in cubes. Each cube that's less than 50% filled is a void space, each cube that's not is all filled. If you build a sphere made of cubes you'll get sections similar to a small circle drawn in Paint. If you get a sphere, sunlight (which rays are parallel) and a transparent sheet with parallel lines you can ...


1

I have two suggestions: Have a look at this old GURPS resource for inspirational material to spice up your scenes. You will have to provide conversion to your system, of course. You could also look on "shops" like Drive Thru Stuff for dedicated "cinematic" advice. I am linking an example even if I don't have direct experience with this


1

For modern settings, I find it easy to find maps rather than generate them. Often a cursory image search for specific floor plans or satellite images can give some not only realistic but quite free maps. If you don't need to be specific that makes things even easier. Edit: Using real floorplans is also a good way to get realistic setups, especially if you ...



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