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15

Nothing special happens by RAW There are no official rules describing being on or off a map in 4E. Squares, and what might be in them, are defined as game elements, but maps are not. Technically, DMs that allow movement off map that looks like it should work (e.g. continuing along a forest path) are playing by RAW. If you can move to a location, and it ...


10

Typically in any roleplaying game whatsoever, if the action moves off the map (a Out Of Character construct to help players visualize the area), you add more to the map, either re-drawing it to show the new area or getting out a bunch more graph paper. Unless of course there is a terrain feature in the way (like a wall, or a ravine), in which case you ...


9

There are numerous products available for sale that provide an erasable surface that has a pre-printed 1" grid on it. Here's one a lot of folks use. Chessex Battlemat. Comes in several sizes, but it's pretty expensive and if you use certain markers on it, they won't come off. You can also buy a large white board and draw a 1" grid in wet erase or ...


7

I've had the same issue last year and did some days of Googling to find out what I needed. Even though I didn't need those tools for the same purposes, I'm pretty much sure you'll find them useful. Solution 1: RP Tools Since you asked for a Windows application, these should fit the most. They're actually five applications that stack with each other. You ...


6

For what it's worth, there are isometric tilesets available for Roll20. A search for "isometric" on the Roll20 Marketplace turns up several results, including Isometric 3D Desert Tomb, Isometric Sewer, and Isometric Dungeon (by Plexsoup; I am not affiliated). The description pages for Plexsoup's isometric sets also includes instructions for creating a ...


5

In the end, the grid is just a tool to assist in representation and should not limit the actions of the participants. Limits like this are common in video games or software map aids, but that's just due to the nature of the medium. Some spells and ranged attacks can reach much farther than even the largest maps can accommodate. I've been in games where ...


4

There's basically two factors you want to make sure to hit upon. Consequential Terrain As you mentioned, the terrain you include doesn't actually influence the combats on the basis of the power levels involved. You should think about what kinds of things DO work at that level. Lava? Alien superstructures that can't be blasted through? Etc. That's just ...


4

"Terrain is often of more value than bravery." — Flavius Vegetius Renatus, De re militari Just because your players are failing to make use of the terrain around them, doesn't mean their enemies won't The NPC enemies that your players face should me making heavy use and advantage of powerful terrain features to their advantage. They should be getting a ...


4

Unlike prior efforts from Wizards of the Coast, Legacy of the Crystal Shard provides no battlemaps, or even any indication of the layout of areas where combats are likely to take place. So, use whatever maps you feel are appropriate to the situation, including drawing your own. When I ran it, I simply borrowed some other maps I had that seemed roughly ...


3

So, the best way to interpret this is to go back to the 3.5 version of D&D. In 4th Edition, there were no circular spell effects. Everything was a square to make things simple for the players and DM. Fifth Edition is going back to the earlier style of play where circles are more common, but on a grid, a circle isn't a circle at all (and they are not like ...


3

We usually draw dungeons onto a large battle map prior to the session. While it gives away a bit ahead of time, I always found it comparable to have a map of the city (or hiking trail) you visit - it's one thing that you know there is a large round place with a church building around the next corner and a completely other thing to end up on St. Peters Square ...


3

There aren't any rules for handling characters leaving the already-defined grid. It's quite reasonable for a DM to wish to keep combat on the defined grid. 4e is a game of tactical grid-based combat, and things like positioning and taking advantage of terrain features are of utmost importance. Gridless D&D 4e doesn't work very well - unless you do a ...


2

I skimmed my DMG and have found no explicit rules for this so it depends on a GM ruling I guess, of course the ruling should take into account the PC's opinions. Generally the grid is like a HUD GM needs to pause the game and extend the battlemap to cover the terrain which always existed there, so in my opinion the DM's who rule to add to the map are the ...


2

I had a similar issue, I accidentally used dry erase markers and the stains remained on my mat for a month or so because nothing worked to get them out. I had a desperate idea so I dabbed the lines with a bit of nail polish remover and then used a regular rubber eraser on the line. It worked, there are a few marks here and there that just wont come out but ...


2

I've created lots of custom battle mats over the years. The best method I have found to do this quickly, cheaply, and easily while still ending up with a durable and resilient mat is outlined in this YouTube video. This method is nice because it does not require cutting, pasting, adhesives, or lamination. The basic idea is that you purchase a poster frame ...


2

In our campaigns we use http://combatmanager.com/ and have made very good experiences. Anyway, it is more of a tracker and it didn't contain a combat map which we didn't need because we use a real world map.


2

I use sheets of acrylic over top of paper maps and use butcher paper as 'fog of war' - I simply pull the butcher paper out as the PC's move forward. I place anti-slip cupboard liner under the maps so they don't slide too. Works like a charm. The acrylic sheets are handy when you use dry-erase markers on top, too.


2

Tabletop Simulator is full 3d and allows you pick up and move anything, but it'll make your game look very much like an actual tabletop-game and I'm not sure that's the style you're aiming for. It's also not really designed specifically for RPG games, but I figured I'd at least give you the option to check for yourself.


2

How about the aptly named 3D Virtual Tabletop? It's currently available on iPad, iPhone and Android. You can import your own maps and minis from images on your device. A web browser version for Mac and PC is in the works.


1

The PHB does not set out any mechanism for determining which squares are affected by a circular spell. However, based on vanilla movement rules, circles are square. Consider the grid movement box in the PHB (p 192): To enter a square, you must have at least 1 square of movement left, even if the square is diagonally adjacent to the square you're in. (The ...


1

Not that I'm aware of, although I did see a video of a guy using the unreal engine that looked interesting. Something like panda 3d also has potential for a 3d game board. I also saw an isometric map from torstan used with maptool, but it was technically 2d, just with an isometric view. Edit: After some thought; I wasn't really following your 2.5d ...


1

As the basis of a house rule, we found this math and diagram my druid-player drew up helpful to accurately figure out square coverage. (As I noted in a comment in Marty Walser's answer, some of the shapes in the the template he provided aren't mathematically correct, although neither is moving diagonally through a grid for the same distance). Click for a ...


1

In my DM kit I have several 8x10 pieces of black felt (purchased at the local hobby store) that I use to cover the parts of the map. I can then reveal the map as players open doors.


1

No. A quick search on the online compendium suggests there are no hard and fast rules about leaving the grid. Whether or not it's feasible, well... I'd say this depends heavily yon the locale of the encounter. If, say, you are in a dungeon, going off the map might mean you would be "in a wall" and therefore not possible. On the other hand, you could be in a ...


1

This is probably not as portable as a map, but we always play in the same location and we all own cars. I don't think we would have used it with the changing locations and 60min bike-travels back at school: We have a opaque plastic board the size of the table and maybe 2mm strong. You can put any kind of map under it, a hexmap, tilemap, predrawn or simply ...



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