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16

You can draw on stained areas with a non-permanent marker then try to remove it. Once I had written on my friend's gaming mat with a permanent marker by mistake. We couldn't remove it no matter what. After a week, while drawing with a non-permanent marker on the stain that left from permanent one, I discovered that permanent marks can be dissolved once it ...


15

S scale models will fit best on a standard 1-inch grid, and with your heroic scale 25mm miniatures. With a 1-inch grid, where each 1-inch square represents a 5-foot square, you are playing at a 1:60 ratio (where 1 real-life inch represents 60 in-game inches.) Your closest model railroad scales are: (source) S scale (aka 3/16" scale) at 1:64, or ≈7% ...


15

Nothing special happens by RAW There are no official rules describing being on or off a map in 4E. Squares, and what might be in them, are defined as game elements, but maps are not. Technically, DMs that allow movement off map that looks like it should work (e.g. continuing along a forest path) are playing by RAW. If you can move to a location, and it ...


10

Typically in any roleplaying game whatsoever, if the action moves off the map (a Out Of Character construct to help players visualize the area), you add more to the map, either re-drawing it to show the new area or getting out a bunch more graph paper. Unless of course there is a terrain feature in the way (like a wall, or a ravine), in which case you ...


9

There are numerous products available for sale that provide an erasable surface that has a pre-printed 1" grid on it. Here's one a lot of folks use. Chessex Battlemat. Comes in several sizes, but it's pretty expensive and if you use certain markers on it, they won't come off. You can also buy a large white board and draw a 1" grid in wet erase or ...


8

I've never used Crayola Washable markers on a battlemat so I haven't had to deal with this personally, but I have a kid so I'm familiar with a particular resource you might find useful – Crayola has a FAQ of tips for cleaning their products off of materials they weren't meant to be used on. The closest I could find for this situation is for Crayola Washable ...


8

The line-of-sight benefits are not actually very much, if any. If you've every played wargames with model-based LOS, you're familiar with the excruciating process of eyeballing, using bits of string, and finally arguing over whether being able to draw LOS to a teeny bit of the tip of a sword sticking up above terrain counts as having LOS or not. Using real ...


7

As noted above, Mike Krahulik of Penny Arcade modeled spherical, planar combat in D&D in the Elemental Chaos part 1 and D&D in the Elemental Chaos part 2. A concern exists that LOE and AOE in Krahulik's models, as well as, prolonged combat and movement were not possible in the models documented. However, both context of Krahulik's efforts and his ...


6

I've had the same issue last year and did some days of Googling to find out what I needed. Even though I didn't need those tools for the same purposes, I'm pretty much sure you'll find them useful. Solution 1: RP Tools Since you asked for a Windows application, these should fit the most. They're actually five applications that stack with each other. You ...


5

In the end, the grid is just a tool to assist in representation and should not limit the actions of the participants. Limits like this are common in video games or software map aids, but that's just due to the nature of the medium. Some spells and ranged attacks can reach much farther than even the largest maps can accommodate. I've been in games where ...


4

Buy a soccer ball Add velcro ??? Profit On a more serious note, you'd need to sort out how movement would work, and possibly subdivide each patch into 5 or 6 triangles depending on the size of the pieces you're velcroing on. Additionally, you might want to prop the soccer ball up on stilts so that you could have units on the entire world.


4

I would print out a flattened geodesic sphere for the minis alongside a printed out and assembled version of the same, using post-it notes or similar to reference where the minis map to on the sphere. For movement, it's triangles instead of squares. Movement along a side is adjacent triangles. I would probably disallow movement across corners, just to make ...


4

"Terrain is often of more value than bravery." — Flavius Vegetius Renatus, De re militari Just because your players are failing to make use of the terrain around them, doesn't mean their enemies won't The NPC enemies that your players face should me making heavy use and advantage of powerful terrain features to their advantage. They should be getting a ...


4

Unlike prior efforts from Wizards of the Coast, Legacy of the Crystal Shard provides no battlemaps, or even any indication of the layout of areas where combats are likely to take place. So, use whatever maps you feel are appropriate to the situation, including drawing your own. When I ran it, I simply borrowed some other maps I had that seemed roughly ...


3

There's basically two factors you want to make sure to hit upon. Consequential Terrain As you mentioned, the terrain you include doesn't actually influence the combats on the basis of the power levels involved. You should think about what kinds of things DO work at that level. Lava? Alien superstructures that can't be blasted through? Etc. That's just ...


3

There aren't any rules for handling characters leaving the already-defined grid. It's quite reasonable for a DM to wish to keep combat on the defined grid. 4e is a game of tactical grid-based combat, and things like positioning and taking advantage of terrain features are of utmost importance. Gridless D&D 4e doesn't work very well - unless you do a ...


2

I had a similar issue, I accidentally used dry erase markers and the stains remained on my mat for a month or so because nothing worked to get them out. I had a desperate idea so I dabbed the lines with a bit of nail polish remover and then used a regular rubber eraser on the line. It worked, there are a few marks here and there that just wont come out but ...


2

Surprised nobody has mentioned it, but a roll of Gaming Grid Paper is a great way to prepare before hand. This way you are prepared no matter which direction your players decide to go! (You can never guess what your players will do) You can make it as detailed as you like and not worry about it erasing or smudging! There are several different brands, and ...


2

What I have started doing is drawing maps on transparencies ahead of time and overlaying them as we go over my battle map. as I run out of room the unneeded can be removed as we go. For large rooms I have a few transparences taped together. Also I keep my transparencies labeled with astick-on white small dot label and a # of the room written on it. I have ...


2

I've created lots of custom battle mats over the years. The best method I have found to do this quickly, cheaply, and easily while still ending up with a durable and resilient mat is outlined in this YouTube video. This method is nice because it does not require cutting, pasting, adhesives, or lamination. The basic idea is that you purchase a poster frame ...


2

If you are free to alter the dimensions of your planet, you can use any one of these nice projections of a sphere's surface. Note that the projections have 24 squares across and top to bottom (15 degrees lat/long each) ie. a 24x24 grid. At 5' per grid square you end up with a circumference of 120' and a 19' radius. Note that most projections lose a lot of ...


2

I skimmed my DMG and have found no explicit rules for this so it depends on a GM ruling I guess, of course the ruling should take into account the PC's opinions. Generally the grid is like a HUD GM needs to pause the game and extend the battlemap to cover the terrain which always existed there, so in my opinion the DM's who rule to add to the map are the ...


2

In our campaigns we use http://combatmanager.com/ and have made very good experiences. Anyway, it is more of a tracker and it didn't contain a combat map which we didn't need because we use a real world map.


1

We usually draw dungeons onto a large battle map prior to the session. While it gives away a bit ahead of time, I always found it comparable to have a map of the city (or hiking trail) you visit - it's one thing that you know there is a large round place with a church building around the next corner and a completely other thing to end up on St. Peters Square ...


1

No. A quick search on the online compendium suggests there are no hard and fast rules about leaving the grid. Whether or not it's feasible, well... I'd say this depends heavily yon the locale of the encounter. If, say, you are in a dungeon, going off the map might mean you would be "in a wall" and therefore not possible. On the other hand, you could be in a ...


1

This is probably not as portable as a map, but we always play in the same location and we all own cars. I don't think we would have used it with the changing locations and 60min bike-travels back at school: We have a opaque plastic board the size of the table and maybe 2mm strong. You can put any kind of map under it, a hexmap, tilemap, predrawn or simply ...


1

3d movement in D&D is made by dividing the space in cubes. Each cube that's less than 50% filled is a void space, each cube that's not is all filled. If you build a sphere made of cubes you'll get sections similar to a small circle drawn in Paint. If you get a sphere, sunlight (which rays are parallel) and a transparent sheet with parallel lines you can ...



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