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59

How do the Kobolds remember which parts are trapped? Basically, this answer is about weaving the Kobold's own marking system into the narrative. It does assume you draw your own maps and don't use Dungeon Tiles or anything. Obtain 6 or so pretty looking symbols (they don't need to have meaning, but if they look Draconic it's bonus awesome) Mark every ...


15

This answer basically trades significant amounts of out-of-game prep-time in order to save in-game play-time. For a variety of reasons (but mostly because it’s horribly tedious), I have only used it a few times. The idea is to mark traps on the grid, and then cut up post-it notes and cover the markings. Have to make sure you have sufficiently-opaque post-it ...


13

Draw lines through corners. None of your examples seem correct to me. While almost everyone uses area templates, the rules specify that you have to draw lines out from the chosen center point until you hit an obstruction or reach the limit of the effect’s radius. These are known as lines of effect, and are actual, geometrical, 1-dimensional lines, not ...


11

I did something like this for a specific large passage in a dungeon in my game, the solution that worked well for me was to have trap placement dictated by a hidden pattern At first it might seem like this would be too obvious, but you'd be surprised how difficult it is to work out a pattern when you don't even know if there is a pattern in the first place, ...


9

I typically use non-combat mapping to help show the relative distances between things and the players. This is typically done using a "You are here" dot for the players and simple lines for relevant features. I even use notations on the map to denote distances given the map is often "not to scale". This means that I still build for a combat, but the players ...


9

A megadungeon is simply too large to feasibly represent during play at 1in=5ft scale, even if you were wanting to, without a lot of work. I find that drawing out every section either beforehand or during play in battle-map scale is a lot of work for very little value. It's more effective to save miniature-scale maps for where they are most effective. So ...


8

I've used a "Minesweeper" strategy for this to good effect. To use @Lunin's example: |T 3 T| | T | |T 4 T| | T | |T 4 T| | T ========= |T 4 T T T | T 4 T 4 T 4 T |T 3 T T T =============== Instead of the numbers, I drew a star-like pattern with a point pointing toward a trap (and a dot in the center if that square was ...


7

Lego (other plastic building blocks are available). I used them when playing D&D with my brothers many years ago. We had a medieval set, which was just perfect for battles with men in armour. However, you can get the building blocks in a variety of colours, and there are plenty of modern sets. If purchasing new blocks, they can be bought by weight like ...


6

For Necromunda games we used corrugated cardboard spraypainted grey then written on with thick black marker pen. We cut slots to attach pieces to other pieces (with liberal use of bluetack and sellotape) to build towers and walkways and ramps and walls and all sorts. Part of the setup of every game was taking it in turns to grab a bit of terrain and stick it ...


6

One thing I do may get at the desire to have old/far past portions 'fall off' that you mentioned in your comments: I laminate 8-1/2 x 11 sheets with 1" grid printed on them and use them as "battle sheets." You can draw up many locations ahead of time and do other ones on the fly, keep them in a binder and lay them out (overlapping) as party enters new ...


4

Cut a bigger battlemat down to size A straightforward solution would be to buy a standard battle grid, like this one from paizo, and cut it into smaller pieces using sturdy household scissors, x-acto or carpet cutter knives. The main benefit is that this works exactly like the big one with regards to what pen you can use or how to erase it. The paizo ...


4

Dry erase markers work very well on clear acetate or poly page protectors. Print your grid, slip it into the page protector sleeve, and you're ready to map and erase. The protectors eventually wear out, but you'll get much more use for your dollar than any commercial whiteboard-like grid you're likely to find. An alternative that I used to use (long ago) ...


4

A very simple approach, which I'm surprised no one has suggested yet, is to simply not decide in advance. Say there are 100 squares, and you want to have 10 traps. So whenever a PC moves to a square they have not been on before, roll a d20, and on a 1 or 2 they stepped on a trap. Problem solved! Or say there are 5 pit traps and 10 spike traps. Now 1 or 2 ...


4

Yes. For movement to work, the Players tell the DM where and how they want to move, and the DM sorts out the outcome and tells the Players the result. For combat, the Players tells the DM what actions they want to take, and the DM sorts out the outcome of their actions and decisions and tells the Players the results. Rinse and repeat. (It's great ...


4

The values on the table Space, Reach, & Threatened Area Templates are just guidelines, most creatures will follow those rules but not all of them have to. One example of a creature that completely ignores the table can be found on AP#27: Council of Thieves - What Lies in Dust, which has the Aspidochelone, a CR 17 N Colossal creature with a listed Space ...


3

Roll20 does that really well, using only your browser. You can use character sheets of many systems, and move tokens. You can restrict access for modifying or seeing token/sheet/handout player by player (or all at once), roll dices on the chat (to prevent cheating), use a fog of war, have several map (but only one at a time is show to the players), ... The ...


3

You could use "Secret ink glasses" : you mark the traps on the map with invisible ink, then put the glasses on, and you're the only one that can see traps ! Pretty fun ;) It's called polarizing ink, you can see an example here : Polarizing ink and glasse video example - Youtube


3

Not trying to sidestep your question, but I think your goal can be accomplished without tracking each square. Track "Zones" In your notes, you could identify areas of the map that contain certain kinds of traps without specifying where exactly on the grid the trap is. When someone passes through a zone, just assign the trap a specific square. This might ...


2

I have a very old battlemat that I just took out of storage. It sat for years with marker on the mat and some baby-wipes cleaned up almost all of the marker residue. I can't say for sure what types of markers were used but the mat was last used about TEN years ago. The ink was almost instantly removed. First it smeared but then the smears cleaned right ...


2

I used an online graph paper maker and purchased a large acrylic sheet from a hardware store (looked for a damaged one for a discount). The acrylic sheet works great with dry-erase markers. The online graph paper maker includes grids, hexes, different weights of lines, etc. Basically, everything you could possibly need. The acrylic sheet also works great ...


2

I would recommend the following YouTube Channel:https://www.youtube.com/user/theDMsCraft The basics are you make your layout with cardboard, glue another layer of cardboard to mark off walls, etc. You could either use something similarly flat for other dungeon dressing, or use dedicated things to help set the mood. I have tried using the Dwarven Fortress ...


2

I would consider marking each square with something, both the trapped and untrapped. You could also tie this visual to a feature, basically say "The blue dots denote the number of shallow pools of water, the dot is a pool, the blue is water. The dash means a tree root, the green means it is covered in ivy." Or whatever, but the idea is you could weave ...


2

Targeting Spell checks which squares it can "shoot" into just like you would would you be standing there, at the point of origin with a bow (assuming that bow has range of 30' with no increment). In the given example you may shoot at any square with a pink(?) dot without hindrance while anything in the squares with blue and violet dots has cover. Spell ...


2

I recommend getting Paizos "Flip-Mat." They're $14 and can be used with dry erase or wet erase. Other similar products also exist, such as Battlemat by Chessex. You can also make your own using a sheet of acrylic from the hardware store and the patience to draw a 1" grid on it (on the underside, so you can draw scenes on the other). Ask the players to state ...


2

So how do you balance keeping the players in the dark about the overall layout of a dungeon, while also providing maps of wherever they happen to be engaged in combat? (especially when you want to make an encounter that could bleed over into some surrounding hallways) One thing to try, have an assistant GM from the party that has access to the map. You can ...


2

You could use a scanner, scale it up, and print it. Or you can buy very nice digital copies from the artist Mike Schley, and print them. Go to staples or office Depot and ask about engineering prints. You should be able to get a large map printed for a few dollars.


1

What I used to do: My battlemap was one of the old ones that we marked on with water soluble markers and had a 1" square grid superimposed on it. The players' figures were always on the map whether there was anything going on or not. When something arose that became a game scene, a quick sketch of the markers outlined where they were -- be it pub, ...


1

That's a good question. Because most of the material is copyrighted, people generally have personal libraries as it is frowned on to share other people's material. However, most of the good tile designers post there stuff all over the place, so for personal use, I doubt there's any issue, but you would need to do the trolling yourself. There's a few sites ...


1

When you say, "play by post", I assume you mean a forum-based game rather than a snail mail game, and that all players will have access to a web browser even though they may not be able to be online at the same time and may not be able to install software where they play. Given these conditions, I recommend... Google Draw It provides a good set of drawing ...


1

You can use any map software (like Maptools or Photoshop) to create the maps on your side, including token positioning, then upload the result image to an external site (like Imgur) and use the [img] tag that is allowed in most php forums. A player can post something like “I will move 1 square in the NE direction and attack the monster”, and when the DM ...



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